Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LWN

Syndicate content
LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 4 hours 21 min ago

[$] Safety-critical realtime with Linux

Monday 25th of September 2017 05:07:44 PM
Doing realtime processing with a general-purpose operating-system like Linux can be a challenge by itself, but safety-critical realtime processing ups the ante considerably. During a session at Open Source Summit North America, Wolfgang Maurer discussed the difficulties involved in this kind of work and what Linux has to offer.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 25th of September 2017 02:52:47 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (bzr, clamav, libgd2, libraw, samba, and tomcat7), Fedora (drupal7-views, gnome-shell, httpd, krb5, libmspack, LibRaw, mingw-LibRaw, mpg123, pkgconf, python-jwt, and samba), Gentoo (adobe-flash, chromium, cvs, exim, mercurial, oracle-jdk-bin, php, postfix, and tcpdump), openSUSE (Chromium and libraw), Red Hat (chromium-browser), and Slackware (libxml2 and python).

Kernel prepatch 4.14-rc2

Monday 25th of September 2017 02:26:02 AM
The 4.14-rc2 kernel prepatch is out. "Nothing stands out, although hopefully we've gotten over all the x86 ASID issues. Knock wood."

GitLab 10.0 Released

Friday 22nd of September 2017 11:03:10 PM
GitLab 10.0 has been released. "With every monthly release of GitLab, we introduce new capabilities and improve our existing features. GitLab 10.0 is no exception and includes numerous new additions, such as the ability to automatically resolve outdated merge request discussions, improvements to subgroups, and an API for Wiki thanks to a contribution from our open source community."

Announcing Intel Clear Containers 3.0

Friday 22nd of September 2017 10:36:34 PM
The Clear Containers team at Intel has announced the release of Clear Containers 3.0. "Completely rewritten and refactored, Clear Containers 3.0 uses Go language instead of C and introduces many new components and features. The 3.0 release of Clear Containers brings better integration into the container ecosystem and an ability to leverage code used for namespace based containers."

Facebook relicenses several projects

Friday 22nd of September 2017 10:09:36 PM
Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects. "This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community."

Samba 4.7.0 released

Friday 22nd of September 2017 09:46:02 PM
The Samba 4.7.0 release is out. New features include whole DB read locks (a reliability improvement), support for running Active Directory domain controllers using MIT Kerberos, detailed audit trails for authentication and authorization activities, a multi-process LDAP server, better read-only domain controller support, and more. See the release notes for details.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 22nd of September 2017 03:24:53 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (augeas, samba, and samba4), Debian (apache2, bluez, emacs23, and newsbeuter), Fedora (kernel and mingw-LibRaw), openSUSE (apache2 and libzip), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (kernel, spice, and xen), and Ubuntu (emacs24, emacs25, and samba).

[$] Notes from the LPC tracing microconference

Thursday 21st of September 2017 08:49:22 PM
The "tracing and BPF" microconference was held on the final day of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference; it covered a number of topics relevant to heavy users of kernel and user-space tracing. Read on for a summary of a number of those discussions on topics like BPF introspection, stack traces, kprobes, uprobes, and the Common Trace Format.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 21st of September 2017 03:35:34 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (tomcat7), Debian (kernel and perl), Fedora (libwmf and mpg123), Mageia (bluez, ffmpeg, gstreamer0.10-plugins-good, gstreamer1.0-plugins-good, libwmf, tomcat, and tor), openSUSE (emacs, fossil, freexl, php5, and xen), Red Hat (augeas, rh-mysql56-mysql, samba, and samba4), Scientific Linux (augeas, samba, and samba4), Slackware (samba), SUSE (emacs and kernel), and Ubuntu (qemu).

Red Hat's new patent promise

Thursday 21st of September 2017 01:41:17 PM
Red Hat has announced an update to its patent promise, wherein the company says it will not enforce its patents against anybody who might be infringing them with open-source software. The new version expands the promise to all software covered by an OSI-approved license, including permissive licenses. The attached FAQ notes that Red Hat now possesses over 2,000 patents.

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 21, 2017

Thursday 21st of September 2017 12:25:41 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 21, 2017 is available.

[$] Linking commits to reviews

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 04:19:01 PM

In a talk in the refereed track of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference, Alexandre Courouble presented the email2git tool that links kernel commits to their review discussion on the mailing lists. Email2git is a plugin for cregit, which implements token-level history for a Git repository; we covered a talk on cregit just over one year ago. Email2git combines cregit with Patchwork to link the commit to a patch and its discussion threads from any of the mailing lists that are scanned by patchwork.kernel.org. The result is a way to easily find the discussion that led to a piece of code—or even just a token—changing in the kernel source tree.

GNOME Foundation partners with Purism to support its efforts to build the Librem 5 smartphone

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 03:40:36 PM
Last week KDE announced that they were working with Purism on the Librem 5 smartphone. The GNOME Foundation has also provided its endorsement and support of Purism’s efforts to build the Librem 5. "As part of the collaboration, if the campaign is successful the GNOME Foundation plans to enhance GNOME shell and general performance of the system with Purism to enable features on the Librem 5. Various GNOME technologies are used extensively in embedded devices today, and GNOME developers have experienced some of the challenges that face mobile computing specifically with the Nokia 770, N800 and N900, the One Laptop Per Child project’s XO laptop and FIC’s Neo1973 mobile phone."

An intro to machine learning (Opensource.com)

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 03:17:55 PM
Ulrich Drepper, once again an engineer at Red Hat, writes about machine learning on opensource.com. "Machine learning and artificial intelligence (ML/AI) mean different things to different people, but the newest approaches have one thing in common: They are based on the idea that a program's output should be created mostly automatically from a high-dimensional and possibly huge dataset, with minimal or no intervention or guidance from a human. Open source tools are used in a variety of machine learning and artificial intelligence projects. In this article, I'll provide an overview of the state of machine learning today."

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 03:13:02 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (emacs), Debian (apache2, gdk-pixbuf, and pyjwt), Fedora (autotrace, converseen, dmtx-utils, drawtiming, emacs, gtatool, imageinfo, ImageMagick, inkscape, jasper, k3d, kxstitch, libwpd, mingw-libzip, perl-Image-SubImageFind, pfstools, php-pecl-imagick, psiconv, q, rawtherapee, ripright, rss-glx, rubygem-rmagick, synfig, synfigstudio, techne, vdr-scraper2vdr, vips, and WindowMaker), Oracle (emacs and kernel), Red Hat (emacs and kernel), Scientific Linux (emacs), SUSE (emacs), and Ubuntu (apache2).

Stable kernels 4.13.3, 4.12.14, and 4.9.51

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 02:44:45 PM
The 4.13.3, 4.12.14, and 4.9.51 stable kernels have been released; each contains another set of important fixes. Note that this is the final update for the 4.12.x series.

[$] Building the kernel with clang

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 05:18:10 PM

Over the years, there has been a persistent effort to build the Linux kernel using the Clang C compiler that is part of the LLVM project. We last looked in on the effort in a report from the LLVM microconference at the 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), but we have followed it before that as well. At this year's LPC, two Google kernel engineers, Greg Hackmann and Nick Desaulniers, came to the Android microconference to update the status; at this point, it is possible to build two long-term support kernels (4.4 and 4.9) with Clang.

Moore: The 2017 Linux Security Summit

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 02:46:44 PM
Paul Moore has posted his notes from the 2017 Linux Security Summit, held September 14 and 15 in Los Angeles. "LinuxKit was designed to make it easy for people to create their own Linux distribution, with a strong focus on minimal OS installs such as one would use in a container hosting environment. LinuxKit has several features that make it interesting from a security perspective, the most notable being the read-only rootfs which is managed using external tooling. Applications are installed via signed container images."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 02:41:16 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (apache and ettercap), Debian (gdk-pixbuf and newsbeuter), Red Hat (kernel), Slackware (httpd, libgcrypt, and ruby), SUSE (kernel), and Ubuntu (bind9, kernel, libidn2-0, libxml2, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-hwe, linux-lts-trusty, and linux-lts-xenial).

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

Red Hat: ‘Hybrid Cloud’, University of Alabama, Red Hat Upgrades Ansible and Expectations