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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 2 hours 35 min ago

Google Code‑in 2019

Tuesday 24th of September 2019 08:34:37 PM
Google Code-in (GCI) provides students ages 13 to 17 the opportunity to participate in open source projects. Google has announced the 2019 round of GCI. "New contributors bring fresh perspectives, ideas, and enthusiasm into their open source communities, helping them thrive. Throughout the last 9 years, 58 GCI organizations helped 11,000 students from 108 countries make real contributions to open source projects; and to this day many of those students continue to participate in various open source communities and many have become mentors themselves! Some have even gone on to join Google Summer of Code (GSoC)." Organizations that are interested in mentoring students can apply for GCI starting October 10. GCI begins December 2, 2019 and ends January 23, 2020.

Release for CentOS Linux 8 and CentOS Streams

Tuesday 24th of September 2019 05:40:53 PM
CentOS Linux 8.0-1905 has been released. The release notes have more details. The CentOS project also introduces CentOS Stream. "CentOS Stream is a rolling-release Linux distro that exists as a midstream between the upstream development in Fedora Linux and the downstream development for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). It is a cleared-path to contributing into future minor releases of RHEL while interacting with Red Hat and other open source developers. This pairs nicely with the existing contribution path in Fedora for future major releases of RHEL."

[$] Better guidance for database developers

Tuesday 24th of September 2019 05:05:24 PM
At the inaugural Databases microconference at the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), two developers who work on rather different database systems had similar complaints about developing for Linux. Richard Hipp, creator of the SQLite database, and Andres Freund from the PostgreSQL project both lamented the lack of definitive documentation on how to best use the kernel's I/O interfaces, especially for corner cases. Both of the sessions, along with others in the microconference, pointed to a strong need for more interaction between user-space and kernel developers.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 24th of September 2019 02:42:25 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (php5), Fedora (blis, kernel, and kernel-headers), openSUSE (bird, curl, fish3, ghostscript, ibus, kernel, libgcrypt, openldap2, openssl-1_1, skopeo, and util-linux and shadow), Oracle (dovecot and kernel), Red Hat (dovecot, httpd:2.4, qemu-kvm, and redhat-virtualization-host), Scientific Linux (dovecot), SUSE (djvulibre, expat, firefox, libopenmpt, and rust), and Ubuntu (ibus and Mosquitto).

[$] 5.4 Merge window, part 1

Monday 23rd of September 2019 03:52:43 PM
As of this writing, 9,632 non-merge changesets have been merged for the 5.4 kernel. This merge window is thus off to a strong start. There has been a wide range of changes merged across the kernel tree, including vast numbers of cleanups and fixes.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 23rd of September 2019 02:48:55 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (expat, php-pecl-http, and php7.0), Fedora (ImageMagick, jackson-annotations, jackson-bom, jackson-core, jackson-databind, and rubygem-rmagick), Mageia (chromium-browser-stable, ibus, kernel, samba, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (dovecot and kernel), Red Hat (dbus, kernel, kernel-alt, and kpatch-patch), Scientific Linux (dovecot and kernel), and SUSE (expat, ibus, kernel, kernel-source-rt, nmap, openssl, and webkit2gtk3).

Stable kernels for the weekend

Saturday 21st of September 2019 09:03:21 PM
The 5.3.1, 5.2.17, 4.19.75, 4.14.146, 4.9.194, and 4.4.194 stable kernels are all available; each contains another set of important fixes.

LLVM 9.0.0 released

Saturday 21st of September 2019 07:44:48 PM
Version 9.0.0 of the LLVM compiler suite is out. Headline changes include asm goto support — fixing one of the main impediments to compiling the kernel on x86 with LLVM — and non-experimental support for the RISC-V architecture.

[$] Many uses for Core scheduling

Friday 20th of September 2019 07:23:06 PM
Some new kernel features are welcomed by the kernel development community, while others are a rather harder sell. It is fair to say that core scheduling, which makes CPU scheduling harder by placing constraints on which processes may run simultaneously in a core, is of the latter variety. Core scheduling was the topic of (at least) three different sessions at the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference. One of the most interesting outcomes, perhaps, is that there are use cases for this feature beyond protection from side-channel attacks.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 20th of September 2019 03:07:22 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (bird, opendmarc, php7.3, and qemu), Fedora (bird, dino, nbdkit, and openconnect), Oracle (nginx:1.14, patch, and thunderbird), Red Hat (dovecot, kernel, kernel-alt, and kernel-rt), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), and SUSE (kernel, openssl, openssl-1_1, python-SQLAlchemy, and python-Werkzeug).

[$] System-call wrappers for glibc

Thursday 19th of September 2019 03:42:39 PM
The GNU C Library has long had a reputation for being hostile to the addition of wrappers for new Linux system calls; that has resulted in many system calls being unsupported by the library for years. That situation is changing, though. During the Toolchain microconference at the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, Maciej Rozycki talked about glibc's new attitude toward system-call wrappers, but also served notice that there is still significant work to do for the addition of any new system call.

Stable kernels 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145

Thursday 19th of September 2019 02:39:50 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of the 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145 stable kernels. Important fixes are contained within; users should upgrade.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 19th of September 2019 01:45:14 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (exiv2, firefox, ghostscript, http-parser, httpd, kdelibs and kde-settings, kernel, pango, qemu-kvm, and thunderbird), Debian (ibus), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, python34, qbittorrent, and samba), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (go-toolset:ol8), Red Hat (kernel, nginx:1.14, patch, ruby, skydive, systemd, and thunderbird), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), SUSE (libreoffice, openssl-1_1, python-urllib3, and python-Werkzeug), and Ubuntu (tomcat9 and wpa, wpasupplicant).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 19, 2019

Thursday 19th of September 2019 12:25:42 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 19, 2019 is available.

[$] Deep argument inspection for seccomp

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 08:07:58 PM
In the Kernel Summit track at the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, Christian Brauner and Kees Cook led a discussion on finding a way to do deep argument inspection for seccomp filtering. Currently, seccomp filters can only look at the top-level arguments to a system call, which means that there are use cases that cannot be supported. There was a lively discussion in the session, but no definitive conclusion was reached; various ideas were considered, but none seemed to quite fit the bill.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 18th of September 2019 02:47:39 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox and kernel), Debian (thunderbird), Fedora (curl), openSUSE (curl and python-Werkzeug), Oracle (kernel and thunderbird), Red Hat (rh-nginx114-nginx), SUSE (curl, ibus, MozillaFirefox, firefox-glib2, firefox-gtk3, openldap2, openssl, openssl1, python-urllib3, and util-linux and shadow), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-lts-trusty, linux-lts-xenial, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, and wpa).

Moving Firefox to a faster 4-week release cycle

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 09:07:32 PM
The Mozilla blog has an announcement that Firefox will be moving to 4-week release cycle, starting in 2020. "Shorter release cycles provide greater flexibility to support product planning and priority changes due to business or market requirements. With four-week cycles, we can be more agile and ship features faster, while applying the same rigor and due diligence needed for a high-quality and stable release. Also, we put new features and implementation of new Web APIs into the hands of developers more quickly." The Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release) release cadence will remain the same.

[$] The properties of secure IoT devices

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 09:03:13 PM
At Open Source Summit North America 2019, David Tarditi from Microsoft gave a talk on seven different properties for highly secure Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The properties are based on a Microsoft Research white paper [PDF] from 2017. His high-level summary of the talk was that if you are creating a device that will be connecting to the internet and you don't want it to get "owned", you should pay attention to the properties he would be describing. Overall, it was an interesting talk, with good analysis of the areas where effort needs to be focused to produce secure IoT devices, but it was somewhat marred by an advertisement for a proprietary product (which, naturally, checked all the boxes) at the end of the talk.

CentOS Linux 7 (1908) released

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 04:46:23 PM
A new release of CentOS Linux 7 is available. This release is tagged as 1908 and derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 source code. The release notes have the details. CentOS Linux 7 (1908) is also available for several alternate architectures.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 17th of September 2019 02:50:35 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (dino-im, python2.7, python3.4, and wpa), Fedora (kmplayer), openSUSE (podman and samba), Oracle (thunderbird), Red Hat (thunderbird), Slackware (expat), SUSE (curl), and Ubuntu (apache2).

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft admits Android is the best operating system for mobile devices

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Canonical releases Ubuntu Linux 19.10 Eoan Ermine with GNOME 3.34, light theme, and Raspberry Pi 4 support

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Canonical Outs Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 19.04 to Patch 9 Flaws

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