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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 2 weeks 3 days ago

GStreamer 1.14 released

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 04:08:37 PM
The GStreamer team has announced a major feature release of the GStreamer cross-platform multimedia framework. Highlights include WebRTC support, experimental support for the next-gen royalty-free AV1 video codec, support for the Secure Reliable Transport (SRT) video streaming protocol, and much more. The release notes contain more details.

Six more companies adopt GPLv3 termination language

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 03:20:42 PM
Red Hat has announced that six more companies (CA Technologies, Cisco, HPE, Microsoft, SAP, and SUSE) have agreed to apply the GPLv3 termination conditions (wherein a violator's license is automatically restored if the problem is fixed in a timely manner) to GPLv2-licensed code. "GPL version 3 (GPLv3) introduced an approach to termination that offers distributors of the code an opportunity to correct errors and mistakes in license compliance. This approach allows for enforcement of license compliance consistent with a community in which heavy-handed approaches to enforcement, including for financial gain, are out of place."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 03:06:00 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (clamav, curl, lib32-curl, lib32-libcurl-compat, lib32-libcurl-gnutls, libcurl-compat, and libcurl-gnutls), openSUSE (various KMPs), Oracle (firefox), Scientific Linux (firefox), SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm), and Ubuntu (memcached).

[$] Porting Fedora to RISC-V

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 01:02:10 AM

In my previous article, I gave an introduction to the open architecture of RISC-V. This article looks at how I and a small team of Fedora users ported a large part of the Fedora package set to RISC-V. It was a daunting task, especially when there is no real hardware or existing infrastructure, but we were able to get there in a part-time effort over a year and a half or so.

Subscribers can read on for a look at getting Fedora onto RISC-V by guest author Richard W.M. Jones.

[$] Super long-term kernel support

Monday 19th of March 2018 05:30:15 PM
Some years ago, prominent community leaders doubted that even short-term stable maintenance of kernel releases was feasible. More recently, selecting an occasional kernel for a two-year maintenance cycle has become routine, and some kernels, such as 3.2 under the care of Ben Hutchings, have received constant maintenance for as much as six years. But even that sort of extended maintenance is not enough for some use cases, as Yoshitake Kobayashi explained in his Embedded Linux Conference talk. To meet those needs, the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) project is setting out to maintain releases for a minimum of 20 years.

Two stable kernels

Monday 19th of March 2018 03:12:18 PM
Stable kernels 4.15.11 and 4.14.28 have been released. They both contain many fixes throughout the tree and users should upgrade.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 19th of March 2018 03:05:57 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (firefox, libvorbis, and ntp), Debian (curl, firefox-esr, gitlab, libvorbis, libvorbisidec, openjdk-8, and uwsgi), Fedora (firefox, ImageMagick, kernel, and mailman), Gentoo (adobe-flash, jabberd2, oracle-jdk-bin, and plasma-workspace), Mageia (bugzilla, kernel, leptonica, libtiff, libvorbis, microcode, python-pycrypto, SDL_image, shadow-utils, sharutils, and xerces-c), openSUSE (exempi, firefox, GraphicsMagick, libid3tag, libraw, mariadb, php5, postgresql95, SDL2, SDL2_image, ucode-intel, and xmltooling), Red Hat (firefox), Slackware (firefox and libvorbis), SUSE (microcode_ctl and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (firefox and php5, php7.0, php7.1).

Kernel prepatch 4.16-rc6

Monday 19th of March 2018 01:28:08 PM
The 4.16-rc6 kernel prepatch is out. "Go test, things are stable and there's no reason to worry, but all the usual reasons to just do a quick build and verification that everything works for everybody. Ok?"

Some weekend stable kernels

Sunday 18th of March 2018 04:20:45 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has released the 4.9.88, 4.4.122, and 3.18.100 stable kernels. As usual, they contain fixes throughout the tree and users of those series should upgrade.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 16th of March 2018 03:07:44 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox), Debian (clamav and firefox-esr), openSUSE (Chromium and kernel-firmware), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (ceph), Scientific Linux (firefox), Slackware (curl), and SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm and mariadb).

Malcolm: Usability improvements in GCC 8

Thursday 15th of March 2018 08:58:23 PM
Over on the Red Hat Developer Program blog, David Malcolm describes a number of usability improvements that he has made for the upcoming GCC 8 release. Malcolm has made a number of the C/C++ compiler error messages much more helpful, including adding hints for integrated development environments (IDEs) and other tools to suggest fixes for syntax and other kinds of errors. "[...] the code is fine, but, as is common with fragments of code seen on random websites, it’s missing #include directives. If you simply copy this into a new file and try to compile it as-is, it fails. This can be frustrating when copying and pasting examples – off the top of your head, which header files are needed by the above? – so for gcc 8 I’ve added hints telling you which header files are missing (for the most common cases)." He has various examples showing what the new error messages and hints look like in the blog post.

[$] The strange story of the ARM Meltdown-fix backport

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:55:17 PM
Alex Shi's posting of a patch series backporting a set of Meltdown fixes for the arm64 architecture to the 4.9 kernel might seem like a normal exercise in making important security fixes available on older kernels. But this case raised a couple of interesting questions about why this backport should be accepted into the long-term-support kernels — and a couple of equally interesting answers, one of which was rather better received than the other.

Stable kernels 4.15.10 and 4.14.27

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:54:46 PM

Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of the 4.15.10 and 4.14.27 stable kernels. Each contains a large number of patches throughout the kernel tree; users should upgrade.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:34:11 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (samba), CentOS (389-ds-base, kernel, libreoffice, mailman, and qemu-kvm), Debian (curl, libvirt, and mbedtls), Fedora (advancecomp, ceph, firefox, libldb, postgresql, python-django, and samba), Mageia (clamav, memcached, php, python-django, and zsh), openSUSE (adminer, firefox, java-1_7_0-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, and postgresql94), Oracle (kernel and libreoffice), Red Hat (erlang, firefox, flash-plugin, and java-1.7.1-ibm), Scientific Linux (389-ds-base, kernel, libreoffice, and qemu-kvm), SUSE (xen), and Ubuntu (curl, firefox, linux, linux-raspi2, and linux-hwe).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for March 15, 2018

Thursday 15th of March 2018 12:04:27 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for March 15, 2018 is available.

[$] Discussing PEP 572

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 08:36:59 PM

As is often the case, the python-ideas mailing list hosted a discussion about a Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP) recently. In some sense, this particular PEP was created to try to gather together the pros and cons of a feature idea that regularly crops up: statement-local bindings for variable names. But the discussion of the PEP went in enough different directions that it led to calls for an entirely different type of medium in which to have those kinds of discussions.

ACME v2 and Wildcard Certificate Support is Live

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:54:38 PM
Let's Encrypt has announced that ACMEv2 (Automated Certificate Management Environment) and wildcard certificate support is live. ACMEv2 is an updated version of the ACME protocol that has gone through the IETF standards process. Wildcard certificates allow you to secure all subdomains of a domain with a single certificate. (Thanks to Alphonse Ogulla)

GNOME 3.28 released

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:43:10 PM
GNOME 3.28 has been released. "This release brings a more beautiful font, an improved on-screen keyboard and a new 'Usage' application. Improvements to core GNOME applications include support for favorites in Files and the file chooser, a better month view in the Calendar, support for importing pictures from devices in Photos, and many more." See the release notes for details.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:24:11 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (calibre, dovecot, and postgresql), CentOS (dhcp and mailman), Fedora (freetype, kernel, leptonica, mariadb, mingw-leptonica, net-snmp, nx-libs, util-linux, wavpack, x2goserver, and zsh), Gentoo (chromium), Oracle (389-ds-base, mailman, and qemu-kvm), Red Hat (389-ds-base, kernel, kernel-alt, libreoffice, mailman, and qemu-kvm), Scientific Linux (mailman), Slackware (firefox and samba), and Ubuntu (samba).

[$] An introduction to RISC-V

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 02:34:46 PM

LWN has covered the open RISC-V ("risk five") processor architecture before, most recently in this article. As the ecosystem and tools around RISC-V have started coming together, a more detailed look is in order. In a series of two articles, guest author Richard W.M. Jones will look at what RISC-V is and follow up with an article on how we can now port Linux distributions to run on it.

More in Tux Machines

Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone will run Ubuntu Touch, as well as PureOS

Purism has partnered up with UBports to offer Ubuntu Touch as a supported operating system on its Librem 5 smartphone. The crowd-sourced, open-source smartphone runs Purism’s PureOS, by default. Purism is also working with GNOME for a version of PureOS with the KDE Plasma Mobile environment, giving users a choice between three OSes. Read more

Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 2700X With Rise of The Tomb Raider On Linux

Here are our latest Linux gaming benchmarks comparing the Intel Core i7 8700K to the newly-released Ryzen 7 2700X. The focus in this article is on the Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux port released last week by Feral Interactive and powered by Vulkan. Read more

Stable kernels 4.16.5 and 4.14.37

today's leftovers

  • Heptio Debuts Gimbal Kubernetes Load Balancer Project
    Kubernetes startup Heptio has added another project to its roster of open-source efforts that provide expanded capabilities for container orchestration users.
  • Heptio Launches Kubernetes Load Balancing Application
  • The Role of Site Reliability Engineering in Microservices
    You can always spot the hot jobs in technology: they’re the ones that didn’t exist 10 years ago. While Site Reliability Engineers (SREs) did definitely exist a decade ago, they were mostly inside Google and a handful of other Valley innovators. Today, however, the SRE role exists everywhere, from Uber to Goldman Sachs, everyone is now in the business of keeping their sites online and stable. While SREs are hotshots in the industry, their role in a microservices environment is not just a natural fit that goes hand-in-hand, like peanut butter and jelly. Instead, while SREs and microservices evolved in parallel inside the world’s software companies, the former actually makes life far more difficult for the latter.
  • Lying with statistics, distributions, and popularity contests on Cooking With Linux (without a net)
    It's Tuesday and that means it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net), sponsored and supported by Linux Journal. Today, I'm courting controversy by discussing numbers, OS popularity, and how to pick the right Linux distribution if you want to be where are the beautiful people hang out. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face.
  • Voyage open sources its approach to autonomous vehicle safety
    In an effort to improve autonomous vehicle safety, Voyage is open sourcing its Open Autonomous Safety (OAS) library that contains the company’s internal safety procedures, materials, and test code that is intended to supplement the existing safety programs at autonomous vehicle startups. Voyage is the self-driving business from the educational organization Udacity.
  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to KubeCon Europe
    The cloud native community is gathering in Copenhagen next week for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe! Here’s your guide to the talks and events you won’t want to miss. Meet the Red Hat and CoreOS team members all week long, May 1-4 at booth D-E01.
  • Event - "GNU Health Con 2018" (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain)
    GNU Health is this year holding the III International GNU Health Conference, GNU Health Con 2018. This conference will gather the community of activists and developers who have been working on the project during the past 10 years.
  • ONNX: the Open Neural Network Exchange Format
    The good news is that the battleground is Free and Open. None of the big players are pushing closed-source solutions. Whether it is Keras and Tensorflow backed by Google, MXNet by Apache endorsed by Amazon, or Caffe2 or PyTorch supported by Facebook, all solutions are open-source software. Unfortunately, while these projects are open, they are not interoperable. Each framework constitutes a complete stack that until recently could not interface in any way with any other framework. A new industry-backed standard, the Open Neural Network Exchange format, could change that.
  • L.A. Lawmakers Looking To Take Legal Action Against Google For Not Solving Long-Running City Traffic Problems
    The city's government believes the traffic/mapping app has made Los Angeles' congestion worse. That the very body tasked with finding solutions to this omnipresent L.A. problem is looking to hold a private third party company responsible for its own shortcomings isn't surprising. If a third-party app can't create better traffic flow, what chance do city planners have? But beyond the buck-passing on congestion, the city may have a point about Waze making driving around Los Angeles a bit more hazardous. For several months, it's been noted that Waze has been sending drivers careening down the steepest grade in the city -- Baxter Street. Drivers seeking routes around Glendale Ave. traffic choke points have been routed to a street with a 32% grade, increasing the number of accidents located there and generally resulting in barely-controlled mayhem. When any sort of precipitation falls from the sky, the city goes insane. Drivers bypassing Glendale are now hurtling down a steep, water-covered hill, compounding the problem.
  • Even Microsoft's lost interest in Windows Phone: Skype and Yammer apps killed
    Microsoft’s given users of its collaboration apps on Windows Phone under a month’s warning of their demise. A support note from late last week advises that “Windows phone apps for Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, and Yammer are retiring on May 20, 2018.” “Retiring” means all three will vanish from the Microsoft store on May 20, with differing results.
  • Should You Build Your Own DIY Security System?