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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 4 hours 31 min ago

[$] Another attempt to address the tracepoint ABI problem

Friday 27th of October 2017 01:18:43 PM
Tracepoints provide a great deal of visibility into the inner workings of the kernel, which is both a blessing and a curse. The advantages of knowing what the kernel is doing are obvious; the disadvantage is that tracepoints risk becoming a part of the kernel's ABI if applications start to depend on them. The need to maintain tracepoints could impede the ongoing development of the kernel. Ways of avoiding this problem have been discussed for years; at the 2017 Kernel Summit, Steve Rostedt talked about yet another scheme.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 27th of October 2017 12:32:00 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (ntp and wget), Debian (exiv2, mosquitto, and zoneminder), Mageia (upx and virtualbox), Oracle (ntp and wget), Red Hat (wget), Scientific Linux (wget), SUSE (xen), and Ubuntu (irssi, systemd, and wget).

A set of stable kernel updates

Friday 27th of October 2017 09:12:04 AM
The 4.13.10, 4.9.59, 4.4.95, and 3.18.78 stable kernel updates have been released; each contains the usual set of important fixes and updates.

[$] The state of the realtime union

Thursday 26th of October 2017 04:44:18 PM

The 2017 Realtime Summit was held October 21 at Czech Technical University in Prague to discuss all manner of topics related to realtime Linux. Nearly two years ago, a collaborative project was formed with the goal of mainlining the realtime patch set. At the summit, project lead Thomas Gleixner reported on the progress that has been made and the plans for the future.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 26th of October 2017 02:34:33 PM
Security updates have been issued by Fedora (cacti, glibc, kernel, libXfont, libXfont2, mingw-poppler, nodejs-forwarded, procmail, SDL2, thunderbird, and tnef), openSUSE (freeradius-server, kernel, and libraw), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (ntp), Scientific Linux (ntp), Slackware (irssi), SUSE (kernel), and Ubuntu (python-werkzeug).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 26, 2017

Thursday 26th of October 2017 12:45:27 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 26, 2017 is available.

The Linux Foundation's annual kernel development report

Wednesday 25th of October 2017 02:06:33 PM
The Linux Foundation has announced the availability of its roughly annual report on kernel development. "This is the eighth such report that is released on a roughly annual basis to help illustrate the Linux kernel development process and the work that defines the largest collaborative project in the history of computing. This year’s paper covers work completed through Linux kernel 4.13, with an emphasis on releases 4.8 to 4.13.". This report, written by LWN editor Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman, will have little that's new to regular LWN readers, but there is a set of nice developer profiles.

[$] From lab to libre software: how can academic software research become open source?

Wednesday 25th of October 2017 01:31:01 PM

Academics generate enormous amounts of software, some of which inspires commercial innovations in networking and other areas. But little academic software gets released to the public and even less enters common use. Is some vast "dark matter" being overlooked in the academic community? Would the world benefit from academics turning more of their software into free and open projects?

SciPy 1.0 released

Wednesday 25th of October 2017 01:26:22 PM
The SciPy project has announced the release of SciPy 1.0. The "Python-based ecosystem of open-source software for mathematics, science, and engineering" has been around for 16 years since version 0.1 and, in reality, the 1.0 designation is overdue. "Some key project goals, both technical (e.g. Windows wheels and continuous integration) and organisational (a governance structure, code of conduct and a roadmap), have been achieved recently. Many of us are a bit perfectionist, and therefore are reluctant to call something '1.0' because it may imply that it's 'finished' or 'we are 100% happy with it'. This is normal for many open source projects, however that doesn't make it right. We acknowledge to ourselves that it's not perfect, and there are some dusty corners left (that will probably always be the case). Despite that, SciPy is extremely useful to its users, on average has high quality code and documentation, and gives the stability and backwards compatibility guarantees that a 1.0 label imply." Beyond the Windows wheels (a binary distribution format) mentioned above, there are some other new features in the release: continuous-integration coverage for macOS and Windows, a set of new ordinary differential equation solvers and a unified interface to them, two new trust region optimizers and a new linear programming method, many new BLAS and LAPACK functions were wrapped, and more.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 25th of October 2017 12:53:16 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (curl and mupdf), Fedora (glibc, SDL2, and sssd), Mageia (kernel, kernel-linus, and kernel-tmb), and Ubuntu (apache2 and subversion).

[$] A block layer introduction part 1: the bio layer

Wednesday 25th of October 2017 07:48:37 AM
One of the key values provided by an operating system like Linux is that it provides abstract interfaces to concrete devices. Though the original "character device" and "block device" abstractions have been supplemented with various others including "network device" and "bitmap display", the original two have not lost their importance. The block device interface, in particular, is still central to managing persistent storage and, even with the growth of persistent memory, this central role is likely to remain for some time. Unpacking and explaining some of that role is the goal of this pair of articles.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 24th of October 2017 03:25:32 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel), Fedora (check-mk and dnsmasq), Mageia (kernel-linus, kernel-tmb, mysql-connector-java, and recode), openSUSE (irssi and jq), Red Hat (httpd24, java-1.6.0-sun, and java-1.7.0-oracle), Slackware (curl), SUSE (openvpn), and Ubuntu (bzr, curl, icu, libffi, libidn, mysql-5.5, mysql-5.7, nvidia-graphics-drivers-384, pacemaker, and webkit2gtk).

[$] Patch flow into the mainline for 4.14

Tuesday 24th of October 2017 10:24:19 AM
There is a lot of information buried in the kernel's Git repositories that, if one looks closely enough, can yield insights into how the development community works in the real world. It can show how the idealized hierarchical model of the kernel development community matches what actually happens and provide a picture of how the community's web of trust is used to verify contributions. Read on for an analysis of the merge operations that went into the 4.14 development cycle.

[$] Digging in the kernel dust

Tuesday 24th of October 2017 10:08:30 AM

Refactoring the kernel means taking some part of the kernel that is showing its age and rewriting it so it works better. Thomas Gleixner has done a lot of this over the past decade; he spoke at Kernel Recipes about the details of some of that work and the lessons that he learned. By way of foreshadowing how much fun this can be, he subtitled the talk "Digging in Dust".

Kernel prepatch 4.14-rc6

Monday 23rd of October 2017 01:22:21 PM
The 4.14-rc6 kernel prepatch is out. "rc6 is a bit larger than I was hoping for, and I'm not sure whether that is a sign that we _will_ need an rc8 after all this release (which wouldn't be horribly surprising), or whether it's simply due to timing. I'm going to leave that open for now, so just know that rc8 _may_ happen."

Linux Foundation debuts Community Data License Agreement

Monday 23rd of October 2017 12:46:47 PM
The Linux Foundation has announced a pair of licenses for data that are modeled on the two broad categories of free-software licenses: permissive and copyleft. The Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) comes in two flavors: Sharing that "encourages contributions of data back to the data community" and Permissive that allows the data to be used without any further requirements. "Inspired by the collaborative software development models of open source software, the CDLA licenses are designed to enable individuals and organizations of all types to share data as easily as they currently share open source software code. Soundly drafted licensing models can help people form communities to assemble, curate and maintain vast amounts of data, measured in petabytes and exabytes, to bring new value to communities of all types, to build new business opportunities and to power new applications that promise to enhance safety and services. The growth of big data analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) technologies has allowed people to extract unprecedented levels of insight from data. Now the challenge is to assemble the critical mass of data for those tools to analyze. The CDLA licenses are designed to help governments, academic institutions, businesses and other organizations open up and share data, with the goal of creating communities that curate and share data openly."

Stable kernels 4.13.9, 4.9.58, 4.4.94, and 3.18.77

Monday 23rd of October 2017 12:24:56 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of four new stable kernels: 4.13.9, 4.9.58, 4.4.94, and 3.18.77. There are fixes throughout the tree in them, so users of those series should upgrade.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 23rd of October 2017 12:14:24 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (irssi, musl, and xorg-server), CentOS (httpd and java-1.8.0-openjdk), Debian (libav, ming, and openjfx), Fedora (ImageMagick, libwpd, rubygem-rmagick, and sssd), Gentoo (adobe-flash, chromium, dnsmasq, go, kodi, libpcre, and openjpeg), openSUSE (bluez, exiv2, python3-PyJWT, salt, xen, xerces-j2, and xorg-x11-server), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk and kernel), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-oracle and rh-nodejs4-nodejs), and Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk).

Schaller: Looking back at Fedora Workstation so far

Friday 20th of October 2017 08:15:32 PM
Christian Schaller has posted a list of the Fedora Workstation project's accomplishments since its inception. "Wayland – We been the biggest contributor since we joined the effort and have taken the lead on putting in place all the pieces needed for actually using it on a desktop, including starting to ship it as our primary offering in Fedora Workstation 25. This includes putting a lot of effort into ensuring that XWayland works smoothly to ensure full legacy application support." The list as a whole is quite long.

[$] A look at the 4.14 development cycle

Friday 20th of October 2017 07:52:44 PM
The 4.14 kernel, due in the first half of November, is moving into the relatively slow part of the development cycle as of this writing. The time is thus ripe for a look at the changes that went into this kernel cycle and how they got there. While 4.14 is a fairly typical kernel development cycle, there are a couple of aspects that stand out this time around.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: New Users, Unity Remix, 18.04 LTS News

  • How to Get Started With the Ubuntu Linux Distro
    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we’ll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)
  • An ‘Ubuntu Unity Remix’ Might Be on the Way…
    A new Ubuntu flavor that uses the Unity 7 desktop by default is under discussion. The plans have already won backing from a former Unity developer.
  • Ubuntu News: Get Firefox Quantum Update Now; Ubuntu 18.04 New Icon Theme Confirmed
    Earlier this week, Mozilla earned big praises in the tech world for launching its next-generation Firefox Quantum 57.0 web browser. The browser claims to be faster and better than market leader Google Chrome. Now, Firefox Quantum is available for all supported Ubuntu versions from the official repositories. The Firefox Quantum Update is also now available.
  • New Icon Theme Confirmed for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    ‘Suru’ is (apparently) going to be the default icon theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. That’s Suru, the rebooted community icon theme and not Suru, the Canonical-created icon theme that shipped on the Ubuntu Phone (and was created by Matthieu James, who recently left Canonical).

OnePlus 5T Launched

  • OnePlus 5T Keeps the Headphone Jack, Introduces Face Unlock and Parallel Apps
    Five months after it launched its OnePlus 5 flagship Android smartphone, OnePlus unveiled today its successor, the OnePlus 5T, running the latest Android 8.0 (Oreo) mobile OS. OnePlus held a live event today in New York City to tell us all about the new features it implemented in the OnePlus 5T, and they don't disappoint as the smartphone features a gorgeous and bright 6.0-inches Optic AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with multitouch, a 1080x2160 pixels resolution, 18:9 ratio, and approximately 402 PPI density. The design has been changed a bit as well for OnePlus 5T, which is made of anodized aluminum.
  • OnePlus 5T Launched: Comes With Bigger Screen, Better Dual Camera, And Face Unlock
    Whenever costly phones like iPhone X or Google Pixel 2 are bashed (here and here) and their alternatives are discussed, OnePlus is always mentioned. In the past few years, the company has amassed a fan base that has found the concept of “Never Settle” impressive.
  •  

Fedora 28 and Fedora 27

  • Fedora 28 Hopes To Improve Linux Laptop Battery Life
    Red Hat's Hans de Goede is spearheading an effort to improve the Fedora battery life of laptops -- and should conserve power too for desktops running Fedora Workstation -- for the current Fedora 28 cycle.
  • Fedora 27 Atomic Host is available on multiple architectures
    The Fedora 27 Atomic Host now supports multiple architectures! Along with the x86_64 architecture, Atomic Host is also available on 64-bit ARM (aarch64) and PowerPC Little Endian (ppc64le). Both aarch64 and ppc64le architectures receive Atomic OSTree updates in the same way x86_64 does.

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