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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 1 hour 44 min ago

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 released

Tuesday 6th of August 2019 02:53:11 PM
Red Hat has announced the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7. "Beyond new capabilities, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 also marks the transition of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 to Maintenance Phase I within the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 10-year lifecycle. Maintenance Phase I emphasizes maintaining infrastructure stability for production environments and enhancing the reliability of the operating system. Future minor releases of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 will now focus solely on retaining and improving this stability rather than net-new features."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 6th of August 2019 02:40:56 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium), Debian (glib2.0 and python-django), Fedora (gvfs, kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, and subversion), Oracle (icedtea-web, nss and nspr, and ruby:2.5), Red Hat (advancecomp, bind, binutils, blktrace, compat-libtiff3, curl, dhcp, elfutils, exempi, exiv2, fence-agents, freerdp and vinagre, ghostscript, glibc, gvfs, http-parser, httpd, kde-workspace, keepalived, kernel, kernel-rt, keycloak-httpd-client-install, libarchive, libcgroup, libguestfs-winsupport, libjpeg-turbo, libmspack, libreoffice, libsolv, libssh2, libtiff, libvirt, libwpd, linux-firmware, mariadb, mercurial, mod_auth_openidc, nss, nss-softokn, nss-util, and nspr, ntp, opensc, openssh, openssl, ovmf, patch, perl-Archive-Tar, polkit, poppler, procps-ng, python, python-requests, python-urllib3, qemu-kvm, qemu-kvm-ma, qt5, rsyslog, ruby, samba, sox, spice-gtk, sssd, systemd, tomcat, udisks2, unixODBC, unzip, uriparser, Xorg, zsh, and zziplib), SUSE (ardana packages, ceph, mariadb, postgresql10, python-requests, and python3), and Ubuntu (bash and glib2.0).

Freedombone 4.0 released

Monday 5th of August 2019 11:21:04 PM
Freedombone 4.0 is available. Freedombone is a distribution (based on Debian 10) focused on the hosting network services under one's own control on home servers. "There is no freedom without freedom of association. That is, having the ability to define who you are and what kind of community you want to live in. This release includes Community Networks as an initial step towards networks run by and for the people who use them." Support for the Wireguard VPN has been added, but the "Fediverse" applications (GNU Social, PostActiv, and Pleroma) have been removed as being too hard to manage.

Kernel prepatch 5.3-rc3

Monday 5th of August 2019 03:55:19 PM
The 5.3-rc3 kernel prepatch is out. "Interesting. Last Sunday, rc2 was fairly large to match the biggish merge window, but this last week has actually been quite calm, and rc3 is actually smaller than usual, and smaller than rc2 was"

Stable kernel updates

Monday 5th of August 2019 02:39:09 PM
Stable kernels 5.2.6, 4.19.64, 4.14.136, 4.9.187, and 4.4.187 have been released. They all contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 5th of August 2019 02:29:31 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (proftpd-dfsg and vim), Fedora (java-11-openjdk and matrix-synapse), Gentoo (binutils and libpng), Mageia (kernel), and SUSE (openexr and python-Django).

[$] vDSO, 32-bit time, and seccomp

Friday 2nd of August 2019 03:52:35 PM
The seccomp() mechanism is notoriously difficult to use. It also turns out to be easy to break unintentionally, as the development community discovered when a timekeeping change meant to address the year-2038 problem created a regression for seccomp() users in the 5.3 kernel. Work is underway to mitigate the problem for now, but seccomp() users on 32-bit systems are likely to have to change their configurations at some point.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 2nd of August 2019 02:12:57 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (firefox-esr and thunderbird), openSUSE (openexr and rmt-server), Oracle (bind, container-tools:rhel8, cyrus-imapd, dotnet, edk2, firefox, flatpak, freeradius:3.0, ghostscript, gvfs, httpd:2.4, java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, kernel, mod_auth_mellon, pacemaker, pki-deps:10.6, python-jinja2, python27:2.7, python3, python36:3.6, systemd, thunderbird, vim, virt:rhel, WALinuxAgent, and wget), Slackware (mariadb), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk, polkit, and python-Django1), and Ubuntu (Sigil and sox).

The GNU C Library version 2.30 is now available

Thursday 1st of August 2019 09:29:45 PM

Version 2.30 of the GNU C Library (glibc) has been released. New features include Unicode 12.1.0 support; wrappers for the getdents64(), gettid(), and tgkill() system calls on Linux; addition of a bunch of POSIX-proposed pthreads calls; protections for memory allocation functions so that they cannot cause ptrdiff_t overflows; and more, such as fixes for two security problems: CVE-2019-7309: x86-64 memcmp used signed Jcc instructions to check size. For x86-64, memcmp on an object size larger than SSIZE_MAX has undefined behavior. On x32, the size_t argument may be passed in the lower 32 bits of the 64-bit RDX register with non-zero upper 32 bits. When it happened with the sign bit of RDX register set, memcmp gave the wrong result since it treated the size argument as zero. Reported by H.J. Lu.

CVE-2019-9169: Attempted case-insensitive regular-expression match via proceed_next_node in posix/regexec.c leads to heap-based buffer over-read. Reported by Hongxu Chen.

GNOME and KDE to co-host the Linux App Summit in November

Thursday 1st of August 2019 06:37:20 PM
The GNOME and KDE projects are teaming up to host the Linux App Summit (LAS) that will be held in Barcelona, November 12-15. "LAS is the first collaborative event co-hosted by the two organizations since the Desktop Summit in 2009. Both organizations are eager to bring their communities together in building an application ecosystem that transcends individual distros and broadens the market for everyone involved. KDE and GNOME will no longer be taking a passive role in the free desktop sector. With the joint influence of the two desktop projects, LAS will shepherd the growth of the FOSS desktop by encouraging the creation of quality applications, seeking opportunities for compensation for FOSS developers, and fostering a vibrant market for the Linux operating system." The CfP is open until August 31.

[$] An end to implicit fall-throughs in the kernel

Thursday 1st of August 2019 03:06:36 PM
The C switch statement has, since the beginning of the language, required the use of explicit break statements to prevent execution from falling through from one case to the next. This behavior can be a useful feature, allowing for more compact code, but it can also lead to bugs. The effort to rid the kernel of implicit fall-through coding patterns came to a conclusion with the 5.3-rc2 release, where the last cases were fixed. There is a good chance that these fixes will have to be redone in the future, though.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 1st of August 2019 01:18:00 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (httpd, libssh2, and qemu-kvm), Debian (glib2.0, squirrelmail, subversion, and wpa), Fedora (proftpd), Oracle (icedtea-web), Red Hat (icedtea-web), Scientific Linux (icedtea-web), SUSE (icedtea-web, java-1_7_0-openjdk, subversion, and zypper, libzypp and libsolv), and Ubuntu (linux-hwe, openjdk-lts, pango1.0, python-django, and subversion).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 1, 2019

Thursday 1st of August 2019 12:27:17 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 1, 2019 is available.

[$] Python and public APIs

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 09:12:22 PM
In theory, the public API of a Python standard library module is fully specified as part of its documentation, but in practice it may not be quite so clear cut. There are other ways to specify the names in a module that are meant to be public, and there are naming conventions for things that should not be public (e.g. the name starts with an underscore), but there is no real consistency in how those are used throughout the standard library. A mid-July discussion on the python-dev mailing list considered the problem and some possible solutions; the main outcome seems to be interest in making the rules more explicit.

[$] KernelShark releases version 1.0

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 04:52:11 PM
It has been the better part of a decade since the last KernelShark article appeared here; in the interim, the kernel-tracing visualization tool has undergone some major changes. While the high-level appearance is largely similar, the underlying code has switched from GTK+ 2.0 to Qt 5. On July 26, maintainer Steven Rostedt announced the release of KernelShark version 1.0, which makes it a good time to take another peek.

[$] Bounded loops in BPF for the 5.3 kernel

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 04:39:31 PM
BPF programs have gained significantly in capabilities over the last few years and can now perform many useful operations. That said, BPF developers have had to work around an annoying limitation until recently: they could not use loops. This restriction was recently lifted by a patch set from Alexei Starovoitov that was merged for Linux 5.3. In addition to adding support for loops, it also greatly decreases the load time of most BPF programs.

Three stable kernels

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 03:13:04 PM
Stable kernels 5.2.5, 4.19.63, and 4.14.135 have been released. These updates are on the large side. The 4.14 kernel is largest with 4748 insertions and 3145 deletions. As usual, users should upgrade.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 31st of July 2019 02:59:04 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (389-ds-base, curl, and kernel), Debian (libssh2), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, and oniguruma), openSUSE (chromium, openexr, thunderbird, and virtualbox), Oracle (389-ds-base, curl, httpd, kernel, and libssh2), Red Hat (nss and nspr and ruby:2.5), Scientific Linux (httpd and kernel), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, polkit, and python-requests), and Ubuntu (openjdk-8, openldap, and sox).

Final call for proposals for the containers and checkpoint/restore microconference at LPC 2019

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 10:45:30 PM
This is the final call for proposals for the containers and checkpoint/restore microconference at the Linux Plumbers Conference; the deadline is Friday, August 2. LPC will take place September 9-11 in Lisbon, Portugal.

Final reminder: LPC 2019 Networking Track CFP

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 07:48:18 PM
This is the final call for proposals for the 3 day networking track at the Linux Plumbers Conference; the deadline is Friday, August 2. LPC will take place September 9-11 in Lisbon, Portugal. "Any kind of advanced networking-related topic will be considered."

More in Tux Machines

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button. Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those. All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update. Read more

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6. To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC). Read more Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

Today in Techrights

How to Check Which Debian Version are you Running

Wondering which Debian version are you running? This tutorial teaches you several ways to check Debian version in the terminal. Read more