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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 2 hours 38 min ago

Security updates for Monday

Monday 23rd of December 2019 03:44:34 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (cups, cyrus-sasl2, tightvnc, and x2goclient), Fedora (cacti and cacti-spine), openSUSE (mariadb and samba), Oracle (fribidi, git, and python), Red Hat (fribidi, libyang, and qemu-kvm-rhev), Slackware (openssl and tigervnc), and SUSE (firefox, nspr, nss and kernel).

Kernel prepatch 5.5-rc3

Monday 23rd of December 2019 03:25:13 PM
The third 5.5 kernel prepatch is out; it was a bit bigger than Linus would have liked. "Anyway, I'm hoping rc3 is a one-off. In fact, with the holiday season coming up, I'd be very surprised indeed if it wasn't. So I suspect things will calm down a lot over the next couple of weeks, but please do use the down-time to do some extra testing instead, ok?"

Some weekend stable kernel updates

Sunday 22nd of December 2019 03:57:33 PM
The 5.4.6, 4.19.91, 4.14.160, 4.9.207, and 4.4.207 stable kernel updates have all been released; each contains another set of important fixes.

[$] Cloning into a control group

Friday 20th of December 2019 11:08:33 PM
The Linux control-group mechanism was designed to make it easy to assign processes to groups or move them around; it is a simple matter of writing a process ID to the appropriate cgroup.procs file in the control-group filesystem hierarchy. That only works for processes that actually exist, though. Adding the ability to place a new process into a control group at birth is the subject of this patch set from Christian Brauner.

Górny: A distribution kernel for Gentoo

Friday 20th of December 2019 03:39:00 PM
Michał Górny describes an effort to create something one might have never expected to see: a binary kernel package for the Gentoo distribution. "I have manually configured the kernels for my private systems long time ago. Today, I wouldn’t really have bothered. In fact, I realized that for some time I’m really hesitant to even upgrade them because of the effort needed to update configuration. The worst part is, whenever a new kernel does not boot, I have to ask myself: is it a real bug, or is it my fault for configuring it wrong?"

Security updates for Friday

Friday 20th of December 2019 02:30:27 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (cyrus-imapd and gdk-pixbuf), Fedora (cacti, cacti-spine, and fribidi), Red Hat (fribidi, git, and openstack-keystone), Scientific Linux (fribidi), Slackware (wavpack), and SUSE (firefox, kernel, mariadb, spectre-meltdown-checker, and trousers).

Alpine Linux 3.11 released

Thursday 19th of December 2019 11:09:13 PM
Version 3.11 of the lightweight Alpine Linux distribution is available. Changes include the 5.4 kernel, Raspberry Pi 4 support, GNOME and KDE support, and the deprecation of Python 2.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation announces TUF graduation

Thursday 19th of December 2019 09:02:52 PM
The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is part of the Linux Foundation that is focused on Kubernetes and other cloud technologies. It has announced that The Update Framework (TUF) has graduated to a full member project. "TUF, an open-source technology that secures software update systems, is the first specification and first security-focused project to graduate. Justin Cappos, associate professor of computer science and engineering at NYU Tandon School of Engineering, initially developed the project in 2009. Cappos is also the first academic researcher to lead a graduated project and TUF is the first project born out of a university to graduate.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 19th of December 2019 02:03:08 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (git, libgit2, and shadow), Debian (debian-edu-config and python-django), Fedora (python-django), Mageia (apache-commons-beanutils, fence-agents, flightcrew, freerdp, htmldoc, libssh, pacemaker, rsyslog, samba, and sssd), Oracle (freetype and kernel), Scientific Linux (freetype and kernel), SUSE (firefox, spectre-meltdown-checker, thunderbird, xen, and zziplib), and Ubuntu (python-django).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for December 19, 2019

Thursday 19th of December 2019 12:25:18 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for December 19, 2019 is available.

[$] A year-end wrap-up from LWN

Wednesday 18th of December 2019 09:20:28 PM
2019 is coming to a close. It has been another busy year with a lot going on in the Linux and free-software communities. Here at LWN, we have a longstanding tradition of looking back at the predictions made in January to see just how badly we did; it's not good to go against tradition no matter how embarrassing the results might be, so we might as well get right into it.

[$] Fedora and optical media testing

Wednesday 18th of December 2019 09:04:12 PM
Once upon a time, Linux was installed from a stack of floppy disks—thankfully cassette tape "drives" were long in the past at that point—but floppies were superseded by optical media, first CDs and then DVDs. These days, those options are starting to fade away in most new computer systems; just as it is now rather hard to find a floppy-based Linux installer, not to mention the media and drives themselves, someday optical media installation will disappear as well. For Fedora, that day has not truly arrived, though a somewhat confusingly presented proposal on the Fedora devel mailing list is, to a limited extent, a step in that direction.

Stable kernel updates

Wednesday 18th of December 2019 03:53:27 PM
Stable kernels 5.4.4, 5.3.17, 4.19.90, and 4.14.159 have been released. They all contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

Update: Stable kernels 5.4.5 and 5.3.18 have also been released. This is the last 5.3.y kernel release and users should move to 5.4.y.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 18th of December 2019 03:45:22 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (debian-edu-config, harfbuzz, libvorbis, and python-ecdsa), Fedora (chromium, fribidi, libssh, and openslp), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (grub2), Red Hat (rh-maven35-apache-commons-beanutils), SUSE (kernel, libssh, mariadb, samba, and xen), and Ubuntu (openjdk-8, openjdk-lts).

[$] One million ought to be enough for anybody

Tuesday 17th of December 2019 10:44:26 PM
Programming languages generally have limits—explicit or implicit—on various aspects of their operation. Things like the maximum length of an identifier or the range of values that a variable can store are fairly obvious examples, but there are others, many of which are unspecified by the language designers and come about from various implementations of the language. That ambiguity has consequences, so nailing down a wide variety of limits in Python is the target of an ongoing discussion on the python-dev mailing list.

SpamAssassin 3.4.3 available

Tuesday 17th of December 2019 05:04:24 PM
SpamAssassin 3.4.3 has been released. It includes a new plugin for finding macros in Office documents, a couple of security fixes, and various other improvements. The project is also letting it be known that, due to the dropping of support for rulesets with SHA-1 signatures, versions of SpamAssassin prior to 3.4.2 will no longer be able to download rule updates as of the beginning of March.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 17th of December 2019 03:55:34 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (libssh, ruby2.3, and ruby2.5), Fedora (kernel and libgit2), openSUSE (chromium and libssh), Oracle (openslp), Red Hat (container-tools:1.0, container-tools:rhel8, freetype, kernel, and kpatch-patch), Scientific Linux (openslp), SUSE (git and LibreOffice), and Ubuntu (graphicsmagick).

More in Tux Machines

QOwnNotes for Debian (update)

Some time ago I posted about QOwnNotes for Debian. My recent experience with the openSUSE Build System has convinced me to move also the QOwnNotes packages there, which allows me to provide builds for Debian/Buster, Debian/testing, and Debian/sid, all for both i386 and amd64 architectures. To repeat a bit about QOwnNotes, it is a cross-platform plain text and markdown note taking application. By itself, it wouldn’t be something to talk about, we have vim and emacs and everything in between. But QOwnNotes integrates nicely with the Notes application from NextCloud and OwnCloud, as well as providing useful integration with NextCloud like old version of notes, access to deleted files, watching changes, etc. Read more

Firefox for Remote Work and Streaming

Devices: Raspberry Pi, WinSystems and Estone

  • How to Fight Coronavirus With Your Raspberry Pi

    With the coronavirus pandemic raging, many PC users have dedicated CPU cycles to medical research using Folding@Home (we’re even doing a fold-off competition with AnandTech). Though Folding@Home does not run on a Raspberry Pi, you can participate in Rosetta@Home, a similar project that’s also researching COVID-19, by installing a free Linux app called BOINC. BOINC has been around for a long time and supports many different research projects, including Asteroids@Home, which does space research, and some of these projects will work on Raspbian, Raspberry Pi’s official OS. However, the addition of Rosetta@Home is new, and if you want to join that project, you need to run BOINC on a 64-bit operating system (OS), such as Ubuntu (64-bit). Rosetta@Home will not give you any workloads if you try it in Raspbian. Here’s how to use your Raspberry Pi to fight coronavirus with BOINC and Rosetta@Home.

  • Compact Apollo Lake computer runs Linux

    WinSystems’ fanless, Linux-ready “SYS-ITX-N-3900” computer has an Apollo Lake SoC, -20 to 60°C support, wide-range power, M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion, and a compact 150 x 150 x 50mm footprint. A year and a half after the first Intel Gemini Lake based embedded computers arrived, we have seen only a few models based on this latest Atom family of chips. Gemini Lake continues to be in short supply, as it has been since its arrival. Yet, the industry keeps churning out computers based on the similarly 14nm fabricated Apollo Lake platform. The latest is WinSystems’ fanless SYS-ITX-N-3900, which runs Linux or Windows 10 IoT on dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake Atom SoCs.

  • i.MX8M Mini Pico-ITX board has a DSP for voice control plus optional AI

    Estone’s “EMB-2237-AI” Pico-ITX SBC integrates a “SOM-2237” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini and adds a DSP for audio. The carrier adds LAN with PoE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, mics and speakers, and an M.2 slot with Edge TPU AI support. Estone Technology’s EMB-2237-AI is the first SBC we’ve seen to combine the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form-factor with an NXP i.MX8M Mini SoC. Other Mini-based SBCs include Seco’s SBC-C61, Boardcon’s sandwich-style EM-IMX8M-MINI, and Garz & Fricke’s recent Tanaro, among others.

Ubuntu: Xubuntu 20.04 Beta Run Through, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Security Fixes and Plymouth

  • Xubuntu 20.04 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Xubuntu 20.04 Beta. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 625

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 625 for the week of March 29 – April 4, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu to Fix 4 Flaws

    Canonical has released today new Linux kernel security updates for all supported Ubuntu releases to address a total of four security vulnerabilities discovered by various researchers. Affecting all supported Ubuntu releases and kernels, a flaw (CVE-2020-8428) discovered by Al Viro in Linux kernel’s VFS (Virtual Filesystem Switch) layer, which could allow a local attacker to crash the system or expose sensitive information, was patched in this update. On top of that, the new Linux kernel security update also fixes a vulnerability (CVE-2019-19046) discovered in the IPMI message handler implementation, which could allow a local attacker to cause a denial of service (kernel memory exhaustion). This flaw affects only Ubuntu 19.10 and Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS systems running Linux kernel 5.3.

  • Canonical Contributing Upstream Improvements To Plymouth Ahead Of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    One of the immediate differences Ubuntu 20.04 desktop/laptop users will notice when booting in UEFI mode is the boot splash screen improvements thanks to leveraging Red Hat's work on providing a flicker-free boot experience and pulling in the UEFI BGRT system/motherboard logo during the boot process to provide a more transitive experience. Canonical in turn is working on pushing some of their improvements back into upstream Plymouth. The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS boot experience is on-par to what has been found in Fedora and other Linux distributions like Arch Linux for over one year.