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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 2 hours 36 min ago

Security updates for Friday

Friday 15th of October 2021 02:14:27 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (squashfs-tools, tomcat9, and wordpress), Fedora (openssh), openSUSE (kernel, mbedtls, and rpm), Oracle (httpd, kernel, and kernel-container), SUSE (firefox, kernel, and rpm), and Ubuntu (linux-azure, linux-azure-5.4).

Ubuntu 21.10 (Impish Indri) released

Thursday 14th of October 2021 05:32:52 PM
The latest release of the Ubuntu Linux distribution is out: Ubuntu 21.10, code named "Impish Indri". The release notes fills in all of the details for the new features in this version, but the announcement lists some as well: Ubuntu Desktop 21.10 makes wayland sessions available while using the Nvidia proprietary driver. PulseAudio 15 introduces support for Bluetooth LDAC and AptX codecs, as well as HFP Bluetooth profiles providing better audio quality. The recovery key feature at installation time has been improved, with the recovery key now optional, stronger and editable. Ubuntu Desktop 21.10 includes GNOME version 40, with a new and improved Activities Overview design. Workspaces are now arranged horizontally, and the overview and app grid are accessed vertically. Each direction has accompanying keyboard shortcuts, touchpad gestures and mouse actions.

Ubuntu Server 21.10 integrates recent innovations from key open infrastructure projects like OpenStack Xena, QEMU 6.0, PHP8, libvirt 7.6, Kubernetes, and Ceph with advanced life-cycle management tools for multi-cloud and on-prem operations from bare metal, VMWare and OpenStack, to every major public cloud.

Devuan 4.0 (Chimaera) released

Thursday 14th of October 2021 04:20:49 PM
Version 4.0 of the Devuan distribution has been released; it is code-named Chimaera. This release is based on Debian Bullseye, has improved desktop support, and benefits from more accessibility work. See the release notes for details.

[$] A viable solution for Python concurrency

Thursday 14th of October 2021 02:31:12 PM
Concerns over the performance of programs written in Python are often overstated — for some use cases, at least. But there is no getting around the problem imposed by the infamous global interpreter lock (GIL), which severely limits the concurrency of multi-threaded Python code. Various efforts to remove the GIL have been made over the years, but none have come anywhere near the point where they would be considered for inclusion into the CPython interpreter. Now, though, Sam Gross has entered the arena with a proof-of-concept implementation that may solve the problem for real.

Plasma 25th Anniversary Edition released

Thursday 14th of October 2021 02:03:38 PM
The KDE project is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a special release of the Plasma desktop.

This time around, Plasma renews its looks and, not only do you get a new wallpaper, but also a gust of fresh air from an updated theme: Breeze - Blue Ocean. The new Breeze theme makes KDE apps and tools not only more attractive, but also easier to use both on the desktop and your phone and tablet.

Of course, looks are not the only you can expect from Plasma 25AE: extra speed, increased reliability and new features have also found their way into the app launcher, the software manager, the Wayland implementation, and most other Plasma tools and utilities.

Lots of details can be found in the changelog.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 14th of October 2021 01:48:18 PM
Security updates have been issued by Mageia (golang, grilo, mediawiki, plib, python-flask-restx, python-mpmath, thunderbird, and xstream/xmlpull/mxparser), Oracle (389-ds-base, grafana, httpd:2.4, kernel, libxml2, and openssl), Red Hat (httpd), and SUSE (kernel).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 14, 2021

Thursday 14th of October 2021 12:50:58 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 14, 2021 is available.

[$] Scrutinizing bugs found by syzbot

Wednesday 13th of October 2021 09:22:06 PM
The syzbot kernel-fuzzing system finds an enormous number of bugs, but, since many of them may seem to be of a relatively low severity, they have a lower priority when contending for the attention of developers. A talk at the recent Linux Security Summit North America reported on some research that dug further into the bugs that syzbot has found; the results are rather worrisome. Rather than a pile of difficult- or impossible-to-exploit bugs, there are numerous, more serious problems lurking within.

Four stable kernels

Wednesday 13th of October 2021 02:57:37 PM
Stable kernels 5.14.12, 5.10.73, 5.4.153, and 4.19.211 have been released with important fixes. Users of those series should upgrade.

[$] Digging into Julia's package system

Wednesday 13th of October 2021 02:55:19 PM
We recently looked at some of the changes and new features arriving with the upcoming version 1.7 release of the Julia programming language. The package system provided by the language makes it easier to explore new language versions, while still preserving multiple versions of various parts of the ecosystem. This flexible system takes care of dependency management, both for writing exploratory code in the REPL and for developing projects or libraries.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 13th of October 2021 02:50:37 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (flatpak and ruby2.3), Fedora (flatpak, httpd, mediawiki, redis, and xstream), openSUSE (kernel, libaom, libqt5-qtsvg, systemd, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (.NET 5.0, 389-ds-base, httpd:2.4, kernel, kernel-rt, libxml2, openssl, and thunderbird), Scientific Linux (389-ds-base, kernel, libxml2, and openssl), SUSE (apache2-mod_auth_openidc, curl, glibc, kernel, libaom, libqt5-qtsvg, systemd, and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (squashfs-tools).

[$] A QEMU case study in grappling with software complexity

Tuesday 12th of October 2021 06:34:10 PM
There are many barriers to producing software that is reliable and maintainable over the long term. One of those is software complexity. At the recently concluded 2021 KVM Forum, Paolo Bonzini explored this topic, using QEMU, the open source emulator and virtualizer, as a case study. Drawing on his experience as a maintainer of several QEMU subsystems, he made some concrete suggestions on how to defend against undesirable complexity. Bonzini used QEMU as a running example throughout the talk, hoping to make it easier for future contributors to modify QEMU. However, the lessons he shared are equally applicable to many other projects.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 12th of October 2021 03:21:13 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (firefox-esr, hiredis, and icu), Fedora (kernel), Mageia (libreoffice), openSUSE (chromium, firefox, git, go1.16, kernel, mbedtls, mupdf, and nodejs8), Oracle (firefox and kernel), Red Hat (firefox, grafana, kernel, kpatch-patch, and rh-mysql80-mysql), and SUSE (apache2, containerd, docker, runc, curl, firefox, kernel, libqt5-qtsvg, and squid).

A study of data collection by Android devices

Tuesday 12th of October 2021 02:00:14 PM
A group of researchers at Trinity College in Dublin has released the results of a study into the data collected by a number of Android variants. There are few surprises here, but the picture is still discouraging.

We find that the Samsung, Xiaomi, Huawei and Realme Android variants all transmit a substantial volume of data to the OS developer (i.e. Samsung etc) and to third-party parties that have pre-installed system apps (including Google, Microsoft, Heytap, LinkedIn, Facebook). LineageOS sends similar volumes of data to Google as these proprietary Android variants, but we do not observe the LineageOS developers themselves collecting data nor pre-installed system apps other than those of Google. Notably, /e/OS sends no information to Google or other third parties and sends essentially no information to the /e/OS developers.

[$] The intersection of modules, GKI, and rocket science

Monday 11th of October 2021 03:24:50 PM
One does not normally expect a lot of controversy around a patch series that makes changes to platform-specific configurations and drivers. The furor over some work on the Samsung Exynos platform may thus be surprising. When one looks into the discussion, things become more clear; it mostly has to do with disagreements over the best ways to get hardware vendors to cooperate with the kernel development community.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 11th of October 2021 03:00:57 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (apache2, mediawiki, neutron, and tiff), Fedora (chromium, dr_libs, firefox, and grafana), Mageia (apache), openSUSE (chromium and rabbitmq-server), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (firefox and httpd24-httpd), SUSE (rabbitmq-server), and Ubuntu (libntlm).

Jörg Schilling is gone

Monday 11th of October 2021 02:28:00 PM
Jörg Schilling, a longtime free-software developer, has passed on. Most people will remember him from his work on cdrtools and the seemingly endless drama that surrounded that work. He was a difficult character to deal with, but he also contributed some important code that, for a period, almost all of us depended on. Rest well, Jörg.

Kernel prepatch 5.15-rc5

Monday 11th of October 2021 12:25:26 AM
The 5.15-rc5 kernel prepatch is out for testing. "So things continue to look quite normal, and it looks like the rough patch (hah!) we had early in the release is all behind us. Knock wood."

A set of stable kernels

Sunday 10th of October 2021 11:40:41 PM
The 5.14.11, 5.10.72, 5.4.152, 4.19.210, 4.14.250, 4.9.286, and 4.4.288 stable kernel updates have all been released; each contains another set of important fixes.

[$] Pulling slabs out of struct page

Friday 8th of October 2021 02:29:59 PM
For the time being, the effort to add the folio concept to the memory-management subsystem appears to be stalled, but appearances can be deceiving. The numerous folio discussions have produced a number of points of consensus, though; one of those is that far too much of the kernel has to work with page structures to get its job done. As an example of how a subsystem might be weaned off of struct page usage, Matthew Wilcox has split out the slab allocators in a 62-part patch set. The result may be a foreshadowing of changes to come in the memory-management subsystem.

More in Tux Machines

pg_statement_rollback v1.3 released

pg_statement_rollback is a PostgreSQL extension to add server side transaction with rollback at statement level like in Oracle or DB2. Release v1.3 of pg_statement_rollback was released. This is a maintenance release to add support to PostgreSQL 14. See ChangeLog for a complete list of changes. Read more Also: PostgreSQL Weekly News - October 24, 2021

Review: Ubuntu 21.10

Ubuntu 21.10 (code name Impish Indri) and its many variant flavors were released on October 14. This release is a non-Long Term Support release, meaning it will be supported for nine months. Like all new releases of Ubuntu, Ubuntu 21.10 comes with numerous updates and enhancements. The most notable of these changes are the customized GNOME 40 desktop and Firefox being a Snap instead of a Deb package. Both of these changes are explored in depth in this review. Installing Ubuntu 21.10 I began by downloading the 2.9GB ISO and copying it to a flash drive. Booting the computer from the flash drive resulted in an extremely familiar experience. Unfortunately, the new installer currently being worked on did not make it into this release, so Ubuntu 21.10 still provides the same installation experience as all the recent releases of Ubuntu. Read more

Indie dev finds that Linux users generate more, better bug reports

An indie developer has found an interesting observation: Though only 5.8% of his game's buyers were playing on Linux, they generated over 38% of the bug reports. Not because the Linux platform was buggier, either. Only 3 of the roughly 400 bug reports submitted by Linux users were platform specific, that is, would only happen on Linux. The developer, posting as Koderski for developer Kodera Software on Reddit, makes indie game ΔV: Rings of Saturn—that's Delta V, or DV, for the non-rocket-science-literate. It's a hard science, physics-based space mining and piracy game that I quite like, personally, for its blend of playability that still honors the basics of spaceflight. If you quite like the space combat of, say, The Expanse, DV is a sim that might be for you. Koderski says he's sold a little over 12,000 copies of his game, and about 700 of those were bought by Linux players. "I got 1040 bug reports in total, out of which roughly 400 are made by Linux players," says Koderski's post. "That’s one report per 11.5 users on average, and one report per 1.75 Linux players. That’s right, an average Linux player will get you 650% more bug reports." Koderski's numbers are a limited sample size drawn from one person's experience, but tell a compelling story. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to use and install Stremio on Linux

    Stremio is a media center that allows users to watch movies, TV shows, and even YouTube videos instantaneously. It also supports DLNA and many other features. Here’s how to use Stremio on Linux.

  • Deploying containers with Consfigurator

    For some months now I’ve been working on some patches to Consfigurator to add support for Linux containers. My goal is to make Consfigurator capable of both performing the initial setup of a container and of entering the running container to apply configuration. For the case of unprivileged LXCs running as non-root, my work-in-progress branch can now do both of these things. As Consfigurator enters the container directly using system calls, it should be decently fast at configuring multiple containers on a host, and it will also be possible to have it do this in parallel. The initial setup for the container uses Consfigurator’s existing support for building root filesystems, and it should be easy to extend that to support arbitrary GNU/Linux distributions by teaching Consfigurator how to invoke bootstrapping tools other than debootstrap(8).

  • Vincent Bernat: FRnOG #34: how we deployed a datacenter in one click

    The presentation, in French, was recorded. I have added English subtitles.

  • How to install FileZilla on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install FileZilla on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Zoom Client on Fedora 35 - LinuxCapable

    Zoom is a communications technology platform that provides videotelephony and real-time online chat services through a cloud-based peer-to-peer software platform and is used for teleconferencing, telecommuting, distance education, and much more.

  • How to Install Sails.js Framework with Nginx on Rocky Linux 8 - LinuxCapable

    Sails.js is a Javascript framework that you can use to easily and quickly build customized enterprise-grade for Node.js. It resembles the MVC architecture from such frameworks as Ruby on Rails, but with improved support for the more data-oriented modern style of developing web applications and is compatible with other front-end including Angular, React, iOS, Android, Windows Phone, and much more. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Sails.js and access the web-based interface by installing and configuring an Nginx reverse proxy setup on Rocky Linux 8.

  • How to Zip and Unzip Files on Android (RAR, ZIP, 7Z) - Make Tech Easier

    If your job demands that you send many large files, or if you just want an easy way to send a large number of pictures to someone, zip files are a necessity – even on your phone! This article shows how to compress or decompress large files on your Android smartphone.

  • How to Install Python Pip / PIP3 on Debian 11 Bullseye - LinuxCapable

    PIP is the standard package manager for installing Python packages. With PIP, you can list, search and download to install packages from the Python Package Index (PyPI). PIP was first included with the Python installer since version 3.4 for Python 3 release and 2.7.9 for Python 2 and is well utilized with many Python projects. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install the PIP / PIP2 or PIP3 on Debian 11 Bullseye operating system.

  • How to Install Google Chrome on openSUSE Leap 15 - LinuxCapable

    ogle Chrome is the most used Internet Explorer software on the earth, with a recent update in 2021 that Chrome is currently the primary browser of more than 2.65 billion internet users. However, as you would know, after installing openSUSE, only Mozilla Firefox is packaged with the distribution but luckily, installing Google Chrome is a straightforward task. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Google Chrome in three various ways in stable, beta, or unstable versions on openSUSE Leap 15.

  • How to browse Reddit from the Linux desktop with Giara

    If you like Reddit but prefer to browse from an app, Giara may be for you. It is a Linux app that allows users to consume Reddit content from the desktop. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install it and use it on your system. Note: You must have a Reddit account to make use of the Giara application on Linux. To create a new Reddit account, head over to Reddit and click on the new “sign up” button.

  • How to Install Brave Browser on openSUSE Leap 15 - LinuxCapable

    Brave is a free and open-source web browser developed by Brave Software, Inc. based on the Chromium web browser. Brave is a privacy-focused Internet web browser, which distinguishes itself from other browsers by automatically blocking online advertisements and website trackers in its default settings. Brave has claimed its browser puts less strain on your computer’s performance than Google Chrome, regardless of how much you ask of it. Even with multiple tabs open at once, Brave uses less memory than Google Chrome-like, up to 66% less. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Brave on openSUSE Leap 15.

  • How to Install / Upgrade to Latest Nginx Mainline or Stable on openSUSE Leap 15 - LinuxCapable

    For those using openSUSE 15 Leap, you might have noticed that installing Nginx directly from its repository does not install the latest stable or mainline version. This is a common trend in most distributions that focus on the stability of packages and provide only urgent bug or security updates until the subsequent major distribution. For most, using the default Nginx that comes bundled with the repository will be preferred, but often many require and want the latest version of stable or mainline for updated features. The following tutorial will cover installing the last stable or mainline versions of Nginx on openSUSE 15 Leap.

  • How to Add a User to Sudoers on openSUSE - LinuxCapable

    When installing openSUSE, the user account that was created during the initial setup has sudo rights. However, there may be a need to add additional sudo users or make the default user have sudo rights. This is a straightforward process with a few commands. In the following tutorial, you will learn to add a user to the sudoers group on any openSUSE system.

  • How to easily download and install apps on Linux with AppImage Pool

    AppImagePool is an AppImageHub client for Linux. With it, users can easily browse and download AppImages from the AppImageHub store. Here’s how to get it working on your Linux system.