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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 1 hour 43 min ago

KDE Applications 19.08 Brings New Features to Konsole, Dolphin, Kdenlive, Okular and Dozens of Other Apps (KDE.News)

Thursday 15th of August 2019 11:36:02 PM
KDE.News reports on the release of KDE Applications 19.08. The release has updates for many different applications, as can also be seen in the official announcement. "Take Konsole, our powerful terminal emulator, which has seen major improvements to its tiling abilities. We've made tiling a bit more advanced, so now you can split your tabs as many times as you want, both horizontally and vertically. The layout is completely customizable, so feel free to drag and drop the panes inside Konsole to achieve the perfect workspace for your needs. Dolphin, KDE's file explorer, introduces features that will help you step up your file management game. Let's start with bookmarks, a feature that allows you to create a quick-access link to a folder, or save a group of specific tabs for future reference. We've also made tab management smarter to help you declutter your desktop. Dolphin will now automatically open folders from other apps in new tabs of an existing window, instead of in their own separate windows."

[$] PHP and P++

Thursday 15th of August 2019 02:03:33 PM
PHP is the Fortran of the world-wide web: it demonstrated the power of code embedded in web pages, but has since been superseded in many developers' minds by more contemporary technologies. Even so, as with Fortran, there is far more PHP code out there than one might think, and PHP is still chosen for new projects. There is a certain amount of tension in the PHP development community between the need to maintain compatibility for large amounts of ancient code and the need to evolve the language to keep it relevant for current developers. That tension has now come into the open with a proposal to split PHP into two languages.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 15th of August 2019 01:26:37 PM
Security updates have been issued by openSUSE (irssi, ledger, libheimdal, libmediainfo, libqb, and libsass) and Slackware (mozilla).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 15, 2019

Thursday 15th of August 2019 12:51:42 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 15, 2019 is available.

[$] Hardening the "file" utility for Debian

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 06:47:49 PM
The file command would seem to be an ideal candidate for sandboxing; it routinely handles untrusted input. But an effort to add seccomp() filtering to file for Debian has run aground. The upstream file project has added support for sandboxing via seccomp() but it does not play well with other parts of the Debian world, package building in particular. This situation provides further evidence that seccomp() filtering is brittle and difficult to use.

EPEL 8.0 released

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 03:45:44 PM
EPEL 8.0 is out. "EPEL stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux and is a subcommunity of the Fedora and CentOS projects aimed at bringing a subset of packages out of Fedora releases ready to be used and installed on various Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)." Beyond the update to RHEL (and CentOS) 8, this release features a new faster-moving "playground" package stream and support for the s390 architecture.

Kroah-Hartman: Patch Workflow With Mutt - 2019

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 03:21:18 PM
For those interested in the details of how one kernel developer works: Greg Kroah-Hartman has documented his email workflow in great detail. "The ability to edit a single message directly within my email client is essential. I end up having to fix up changelog text, editing the subject line to be correct, fixing the mail headers to not do foolish things with text formats, and in some cases, editing the patch itself for when it is corrupted or needs to be fixed (I want a Linkedin skill badge for 'can edit diff files by hand and have them still work')"

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 14th of August 2019 02:53:55 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (kernel, linux-4.9, otrs2, and tomcat8), Fedora (igraph and jhead), openSUSE (ansible, GraphicsMagick, kconfig, kdelibs4, live555, mumble, phpMyAdmin, proftpd, python-Django, and znc), Oracle (kernel and openssl), Red Hat (kernel, openssl, and rh-mysql80-mysql), Scientific Linux (kernel and openssl), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (containerd, docker, docker-runc, golang-github-docker-libnetwork and mariadb-100), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-snapdragon, php5, php7.0, php7.2, and wpa).

[$] Corner cases and exception types

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 09:13:05 PM
Some unanticipated corner cases with Python's new "walrus" operator—described in our Python 3.8 overview—have cropped up recently. The problematic uses of the operator will be turned into errors before the final release, but just what exception should be raised came into question. It seems that the exception specified in the PEP for the operator may not really be the best choice, as a recent discussion hashed out.

[$] Long-term get_user_pages() and truncate(): solved at last?

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 06:53:58 PM
Technologies like RDMA benefit from the ability to map file-backed pages into memory. This benefit extends to persistent-memory devices, where the backing store for the file can be mapped directly without the need to go through the kernel's page cache. There is a fundamental conflict, though, between mapping a file's backing store directly and letting the filesystem code modify that file's on-disk layout, especially when the mapping is held in place for a long time (as RDMA is wont to do). The problem seems intractable, but there may yet be a solution in the form of this patch set (marked "V1,000,002") from Ira Weiny.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 13th of August 2019 02:32:18 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, postgresql, and postgresql-libs), Debian (atril, chromium, evince, ghostscript, jackson-databind, kernel, and php5), Fedora (kf5-kconfig, mingw-sqlite, pam-u2f, and poppler), Mageia (kernel), openSUSE (aubio, chromium, kconfig, kdelibs4, nodejs10, osc, and zstd), Red Hat (ghostscript), and Ubuntu (ghostscript and MariaDB).

Xfce 4.14 released

Monday 12th of August 2019 05:05:13 PM
The Xfce desktop 4.14 is out. "In this 4.14 cycle the main goal was to port all core components to Gtk3 (over Gtk2) and GDBus (over D-Bus GLib). Most components also received GObject Introspection support. Along the way we ended up polishing our user experience, introducing quite a few new features and improvements."

LXD 3.16 released

Monday 12th of August 2019 04:15:31 PM
Version 3.16 of the LXD system container manager has been released. "This release includes a number of new features, configuration options and improvements to the command line tool. Behind the scenes, a lot of work has gone into reworking the infrastructure used for container devices with the nic, infiniband and proxy devices having switched over to the new logic. This should result in much cleaner code that is easier to debug, better tests and more thorough error handling and configuration validation."

GNU Radio 3.8.0.0 released

Monday 12th of August 2019 03:54:15 PM
GNU Radio is an extensive framework for software-defined radio development. The 3.8.0.0 release is finally available. "It's the first minor release version since more than six years, not without pride this community stands to face the brightest future SDR on general purpose hardware ever had."

Two stable kernels

Monday 12th of August 2019 02:35:59 PM
Stable kernels 4.9.189 and 4.4.189 have been released. They both contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 12th of August 2019 02:31:31 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (fusiondirectory, gosa, kconfig, kernel, pango1.0, and python-django), Fedora (aubio, icedtea-web, java-1.8.0-openjdk, kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, libslirp, openqa, os-autoinst, and upx), Gentoo (JasPer, libvncserver, and redis), Mageia (cyrus-imapd and php), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (chromium-browser, cockpit-ovirt, Red Hat Virtualization, and rhvm-appliance), SUSE (ImageMagick, libvirt, python, and wireshark), and Ubuntu (poppler).

Kernel prepatch 5.3-rc4

Monday 12th of August 2019 01:34:29 PM
The 5.3-rc4 kernel prepatch has been released for testing. "I mentioned last week that rc3 was unusually small. Well, we fixed that."

Stable kernels 5.2.8, 4.19.66, and 4.14.138

Friday 9th of August 2019 05:58:42 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of three new stable kernels: 5.2.8, 4.19.66, and 4.14.138. As usual, the kernels contain important fixes, so users should upgrade.

[$] Akaunting: a web-based accounting system

Friday 9th of August 2019 04:31:27 PM
One of these years, LWN will have a new accounting system based on free software. That transition has not yet happened, though, despite the expending of a fair amount of energy into researching alternatives. Your editor recently became aware of a system called Akaunting, so a look seemed worthwhile. This tool may have the features that some users want, but it seems clear that your editor's quest is not done yet.

A Kubernetes security assessment

Friday 9th of August 2019 04:12:23 PM
The Kubernetes community has posted the extensive results [PDF] of a security assessment performed earlier this year. "Overall, Kubernetes is a large system with significant operational complexity. The assessment team found configuration and deployment of Kubernetes to be non-trivial, with certain components having confusing default settings, missing operational controls, and implicitly defined security controls. Also, the state of the Kubernetes codebase has significant room for improvement. The codebase is large and complex, with large sections of code containing minimal documentation and numerous dependencies, including systems external to Kubernetes. There are many cases of logic re-implementation within the codebase which could be centralized into supporting libraries to reduce complexity, facilitate easier patching, and reduce the burden of documentation across disparate areas of the codebase."

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Intel SoC, Mesa Driver, and Quad Core Cortex-A35

  • Linux Begins Preparing For Intel's New "Lightning Mountain" SoC

    Linux kernel development activity has shown light on a new Intel SoC we haven't anything about to date... Lightning Mountain.  We haven't seen Intel Lightning Mountain referenced elsewhere yet but in our original monitoring of the various Linux kernel patch flow, this is a new Atom SoC on the way. 

  • ARB_gl_spirv and ARB_spirv_extension support for i965 landed Mesa master

    And something more visible thanks to that: now the Intel Mesa driver exposes OpenGL 4.6 support, the most recent version of OpenGL. As perhaps you could recall, the i965 Intel driver became 4.6 conformant last year. You have more details about that, and what being conformant means in this Iago blog post. On that blog post Iago mentioned that it was passing with an early version of the ARB_gl_spirv support, that we were improving and interating during this time so it could be included on Mesa master. At the same time, the CTS tests were only testing the specifics of the extensions, and we wanted a more detailed testing, so we also were adding more tests on the piglit test suite, written manually for ARB_gl_spirv or translated from existing GLSL tests.

  • Compulab CL-SOM-iMX8X SoM & SBC Feature NXP i.MX 8QuadXPlus Quad Core Cortex-A35 Processor

    NXP i.MX 8X Cortex-A35 processor designed for automotive infotainment and a variety of industrial applications was officially announced in early 2017...

Red Hat/Fedora: Flock’19 Budapest, Cockpit 201 and Systemd 243 RC2

  • Flock’19 Budapest

    This was the first occurrence of the conference for me to attend. Its an annual Fedora Community gathering, which happens in a new city of Europe every year. This time it was in Budapest, the capital of Hungary, last year it was hosted in Dresden. Dates for the same were: 8th Aug through 11th Aug 2019. Also I got an opportunity to present there on my proposal: “Getting Started with Fedora QA”. Day 1 Started with a Keynote by Mathew Miller (mattdm). In here he spoke about where we as a community are and where we need to go further. It was a knowledgeable discussion for a first timer like me who was always looking out for the Vision and Mission of Fedora community. There are people who are with Fedora since its first release and you get to meet them here at the annual gathering. [...] Groups were formed and people decided for themselves where they wanted to go for the evening hangout on the Day 1. We were 7 people who decided to hangout at the Atmosphere Klub near the V.Kerulet and left at around 9:00 pm by walk. Day 2 started with a keynote by Denise Dumas, Vice President, Operating System Platform, Red Hat. She spoke on “Fedora, Red Hat and IBM”. I woke up late, 20 minutes before the first session as I went to bed late last night and had walked for around 11 kms the day before.

  • Fedora 30 : Set up the Linux Malware Detect.
  • Cockpit 201

    It’s now again possible to stop a service, without disabling it. Reloading is now available only when the service allows it. Furthermore, disabling or masking a service removes any lingering “failed” state, reducing noise.

  • Systemd 243 RC2 Released

    Released nearly one month ago was the systemd 243 release candidate while the official update has yet to materialize. It looks though like it may be on the horizon with a second release candidate being posted today. Red Hat's Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek has just tagged systemd 243-RC2 as the newest test release for this new version of this de facto Linux init system. Over the past month have been new hardware database (HWDB) additions, various fixes, new network settings, resolvectl zsh shell completion support, bumping timedated to always run at the highest priority, and other changes.

Announcing Qt for MCUs

  • Announcing Qt for MCUs

    Today we announce the launch of Qt for MCUs – a comprehensive toolkit to deliver smartphone-like user experience on displays powered by microcontrollers. What started as a research project is now in the final leg of its journey to being released as a product. Connected devices found in vehicles, wearables, smart home, industrial and healthcare often have requirements that include real-time processing capabilities, low power consumption, instant boot time and low bill of materials. These requirements can be fulfilled by a microcontroller architecture. However, as devices get smarter and offer more features and capabilities, users expect an enhanced and intuitive experience on par with today’s smartphones. Qt for MCUs delivers an immersive and enriching user interface by utilizing a new runtime specifically developed for ARM Cortex-M microcontrollers and leveraging on-chip 2D graphics accelerators such as PxP on NXP’s i.MX RT series, Chrom-Art Accelerator on STM32 series and RGL on Renesas RH850.

  • Qt for MCUs – Qt Announces support for Microcontrollers

    About Qt for MCUs Qt- The well known opensource toolkit for creating graphical interface announced their new release: Qt for MCUs, targeting MCU’s.

  • The Qt Company Is Now Working On Qt For Microcontrollers

    There have been a lot of announcements pertaining to Qt as of late, most of which have been about forthcoming efforts around Qt 6 development. A new announcement out of The Qt Company catching us off-guard is their plans for the tool-kit on micro-controllers. Qt for MCUs is the company's newest commercial endeavour. In particular, they are working on the Qt tool-kit for displays powered by micro-controllers for smartphone-like user experiences. Qt for MCUs has been a research project at the company but is now being worked out as a new commercial offering. Considering how well though Qt works on mobile devices, it's only another step down catering it to low-power micro-controllers.