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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 1 hour 29 min ago

Stallman: No radical changes in GNU Project

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 06:46:01 PM
Richard Stallman has issued a brief statement saying that there will not be any radical changes in the GNU Project's goals, principles and policies. "I would like to make incremental changes in how some decisions are made, because I won't be here forever and we need to ready others to make GNU Project decisions when I can no longer do so. But these won't lead to unbounded or radical changes."

[$] Free software support for virtual and augmented reality

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 04:05:12 PM
A talk at the recent X.Org Developers Conference in Montréal, Canada looked at support for "XR" in free software. XR is an umbrella term that includes both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). In the talk, Joey Ferwerda and Christoph Haag from Collabora gave an overview of XR and the Monado project that provides support for those types of applications.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 02:57:03 PM
Security updates have been issued by Fedora (chromium), openSUSE (rust and sqlite3), SUSE (dnsmasq, firefox, and kubernetes, patchinfo), and Ubuntu (python2.7, python3.5, python3.6, python3.7).

OpenSSH 8.1 released

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 02:39:40 PM
OpenSSH 8.1 is out. It includes some security fixes, including the encryption of keys at rest to defend them against speculative-execution attacks. There is also an experimental new signature and verification mechanism for public keys.

Six stable kernels

Tuesday 8th of October 2019 03:14:03 PM
Stable kernels 5.3.5, 5.2.20, 4.19.78, 4.14.148, 4.9.196, and 4.4.196 have been released. They all contain the usual set of important fixes. This is the last 5.2 kernel and users should move to the 5.3.y kernel series now.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 8th of October 2019 03:01:30 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (openjpeg2, openssh, and xen), openSUSE (dovecot23, jasper, libseccomp, lxc, putty, and singularity), Red Hat (bind, kernel, polkit, python, and wget), and Ubuntu (unbound).

[$] Adding the pidfd abstraction to the kernel

Monday 7th of October 2019 03:59:40 PM
One of the many changes in the 5.4 kernel is the completion (insofar as anything in the kernel is truly complete) of the pidfd API. Getting that work done has been "a wild ride so far", according to its author Christian Brauner during a session at the 2019 Kernel Recipes conference. He went on to describe the history of this work and some lessons for others interested in adding major new APIs to the Linux kernel.

Richard Stallman and the GNU project

Monday 7th of October 2019 03:59:24 PM
While Richard Stallman has resigned from the Free Software Foundation and MIT, he continues to hold onto his position as the head of the GNU project. Now, the FSF has announced that it is "working with GNU leadership on a shared understanding of the relationship for the future" and is seeking comments from the community on what that should be.

Meanwhile, a group of maintainers for specific GNU projects has posted a joint statement calling for new leadership at GNU. "We believe that Richard Stallman cannot represent all of GNU. We think it is now time for GNU maintainers to collectively decide about the organization of the project. The GNU Project we want to build is one that everyone can trust to defend their freedom."

Security updates for Monday

Monday 7th of October 2019 02:24:19 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (jackson-databind, libapreq2, libreoffice, novnc, phpbb3, and ruby-mini-magick), Fedora (mbedtls and mosquitto), Mageia (xpdf), openSUSE (bind, firefox, nginx, openssl-1_0_0, php7, python-numpy, and thunderbird), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (ansible1, ardana-ansible, ardana-cluster, ardana-db, ardana-extensions-nsx, ardana-glance, ardana-input-model, ardana-installer-ui, ardana-manila, ardana-monasca, ardana-neutron, ardana-nova, ardana-octavia, ardana-opsconsole-ui, ardana-osconfig, ardana-service, ardana-tls, crowbar-core, crowbar-ha, crowbar-openstack, crowbar-ui, grafana, novnc, openstack-cinder, openstack-dashboard, openstack-designate, openstack-glance, openstack-heat, openstack-horizon-plugin-heat-ui, openstack-horizon-plugin-monasca-ui, openstack-ironic, openstack-ironic-python-agent, openstack-keystone, openstack-manila, openstack-neutron, openstack-neutron-gbp, openstack-nova, openstack-octavia, openstack-sahara, openstack-tempest, openstack-watcher, python-ardana-configurationprocessor, python-cinder-tempest-plugin, python-urllib3, rubygem-easy_diff, bind, compat-openssl098, nginx, and openssl-1_0_0), and Ubuntu (linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon and openexr).

Kernel prepatch 5.4-rc2

Sunday 6th of October 2019 09:59:59 PM
The second 5.4 kernel prepatch is out for testing. "So nothing looks particularly worrisome, but usually rc2 is fairly calm and it takes a while for any regressions to be noticed." This release also changes the code name to "Nesting Opossum".

Some weekend stable kernel updates

Sunday 6th of October 2019 04:41:59 PM
The 5.3.4, 5.2.19, 4.19.77, 4.14.147, 4.9.195, and 4.4.195 stable kernel updates have all been released; each contains a relatively large set of important fixes and updates.

[$] What to do about CVE numbers

Friday 4th of October 2019 03:14:31 PM
Common Vulnerability and Exposure (CVE) numbers have been used for many years as a way of uniquely identifying software vulnerabilities. It has become increasingly clear in recent years that there are problems with CVE numbers, though, and increasing numbers of vulnerabilities are not being assigned CVE numbers at all. At the 2019 Kernel Recipes event, Greg Kroah-Hartman delivered a "40-minute rant with an unsatisfactory conclusion" on CVE numbers and how the situation might be improved. The conclusion may be "unsatisfactory", but it seems destined to stir up some discussion regardless.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 4th of October 2019 02:44:59 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (exim, ruby, ruby-rdoc, ruby2.5, and systemd), Debian (openconnect), Mageia (thunderbird), openSUSE (lxc and mosquitto), Oracle (kernel and patch), Scientific Linux (patch), SUSE (firefox, java-1_7_0-ibm, and sqlite3), and Ubuntu (clamav).

Calibre 4.0 released

Friday 4th of October 2019 01:50:56 PM
Version 4.0 of the Calibre ebook management application is out. "It has been two years since calibre 3.0. This time has been spent mostly in making the calibre Content server ever more capable as well as migrating calibre itself from Qt WebKit to Qt WebEngine, because the former is no longer maintained. The Content server has gained the ability to Edit metadata, Add/remove books and even Convert books to and from all the formats calibre itself supports. It is now a full fledged interface to your calibre libraries."

[$] Why printk() is so complicated (and how to fix it)

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 03:46:19 PM
The kernel's printk() function seems like it should be relatively simple; all it does is format a string and output it to the kernel logs. That simplicity hides a lot of underlying complexity, though, and that complexity is why kernel developers are still unhappy with printk() after 28 years. At the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, John Ogness explained where the complexity in printk() comes from and what is being done to improve the situation.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 02:41:39 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel), Debian (jackson-databind, libapreq2, and subversion), Fedora (glpi, memcached, and zeromq), openSUSE (rust), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (patch), and SUSE (dovecot23, git, jasper, libseccomp, and thunderbird).

PostgreSQL 12 released

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 01:21:32 PM
Version 12 of the PostgreSQL database management system is out. "PostgreSQL 12 enhancements include notable improvements to query performance, particularly over larger data sets, and overall space utilization. This release provides application developers with new capabilities such as SQL/JSON path expression support, optimizations for how common table expression ('WITH') queries are executed, and generated columns. The PostgreSQL community continues to support the extensibility and robustness of PostgreSQL, with further additions to internationalization, authentication, and providing easier ways to administrate PostgreSQL. This release also introduces the pluggable table storage interface, which allows developers to create their own methods for storing data."

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 3, 2019

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 12:02:06 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 3, 2019 is available.

[$] Starting The Document Collective

Wednesday 2nd of October 2019 07:16:50 PM
The Document Foundation (TDF) is the home of the LibreOffice free-software office suite; it provides financial, governance, and other administrative services to LibreOffice. The foundation was established in part to ensure that commercial entities did not have undue influence on the project, which limited the types of activities in which it can engage. In particular, selling branded versions of LibreOffice in the macOS and Windows app stores has not been something that TDF could tackle. The TDF board of directors is looking to change that with the creation of a new entity, The Document Collective (TDC), to engage in commercial activity that is complementary to that of TDF members—hopefully as an income source to help support TDF.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 2nd of October 2019 02:38:07 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (openssl and openssl1.0), Fedora (expat, kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, and phpMyAdmin), openSUSE (nghttp2 and u-boot), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (rh-nodejs8-nodejs), Slackware (libpcap), SUSE (bind, jasper, libgcrypt, openssl-1_0_0, and php7), and Ubuntu (clamav).

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