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AMD: CPU Microcode, RADV, Blender Foundation and AMDVLK

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Updated AMD Zen CPU Microcode Lands In Linux-Firmware Tree

    But as is often the case with new additions to linux-firmware.git, the changes to said microcode/firmware binaries aren't usually described in any level of detail. Though with this Zen CPU microcode update it ultimately shouldn't mean too much assuming you are punctual with your motherboard firmware updates that generally ship with the new AMD CPU microcode revisions, in which case the older (in-tree) firmware isn't loaded.

  • RADV Lands More Fixes + Performance Improvements Into Mesa 19.3

    It's always great waking up and to find RADV improvements in Mesa Git for this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver that is particularly popular with Linux gamers.

    Hitting Mesa 19.3 overnight was re-enabling fast depth/stencil clears with separate aspects for GFX10/Navi. This was disabled before for causing "weird issues" on GFX10 but no longer appears to be the case. This path also works fine when tested with Feral's new Shadow of Mordor Vulkan beta.

  • AMD Joins The Blender Foundation With An Emphasis On Vulkan

    Just earlier this month NVIDIA announced their funding of the Blender Foundation at the flagship "patron" level and now AMD has followed them in backing this foundation for assisting the development of this leading 3D creation software.

    AMD now joins NVIDIA and Epic Games at the patron level, which means contributing at least €120k per year to the foundation.

  • AMDVLK 2019.Q4.1 Vulkan Driver Brings Performance Tuning, Reworked Pipeline Cache

    AMD has been off their weekly release regiment for their open-source AMDVLK Vulkan driver but this morning they issued their first new release in just about one month.

    AMDVLK 2019.Q4.1 is this first AMDVLK source drop for the fourth quarter. Given the four weeks since the last Linux Vulkan driver source update, there have been many changes/improvements. Some of the large work items include supporting host mapped foreign memory (VKI_EXT_HOST_MAPPED_FOREIGN_MEMORY), reworking of its Vulkan pipeline cache and other cache improvements, and tuning the shader performance for F1 2017 and The Talos Principle.

Linux driver suggests Intel might be considering multi-GPU...

  • Linux driver suggests Intel might be considering multi-GPU suppor

    Most of the details surrounding Intel's plans in the discrete graphics card space are being kept close to the company's vest, and it will probably stay that way until next year. In the meantime, there are potential clues to be found. One might be contained in a Linux driver update, which hints at multi-GPU support being a possibility.

    This is something both AMD and Nvidia have sort of steered away from, with regards to each company's graphics cards—neither one is heavily promoting CrossFire (AMD) or SLI (Nvidia) like they used to.

Intel might be considering multi-GPU support

  • Linux driver suggests Intel might be considering multi-GPU support

    Most of the details surrounding Intel's plans in the discrete graphics card space are being kept close to the company's vest, and it will probably stay that way until next year. In the meantime, there are potential clues to be found. One might be contained in a Linux driver update, which hints at multi-GPU support being a possibility.

    This is something both AMD and Nvidia have sort of steered away from, with regards to each company's graphics cards—neither one is heavily promoting CrossFire (AMD) or SLI (Nvidia) like they used to.

    It remains to be seen if Intel will take a different approach. That said, the folks at Phoronix made an interesting discovery. They noticed changes in the Linux 5.5 kernel that point to Intel ombining a discrete GPU with the integrated graphics on its processors.

    This is actually something Phoronix also observed in an earlier driver release. Seeing it again possibly suggests this is something Intel wants to flesh out.

Linux driver suggests dual-GPU support for Intel's...

  • Linux driver suggests dual-GPU support for Intel's upcoming Xe graphics

    INTEL'S UPCOMING XE GRAPHICS CARDS will play nice when it's plonked into PC's with the chipmaker's integrated graphics, allowing for dual-GPU setups; at least that's what a Linux driver suggests.

    Spotted by the people over at Phoronix, the Linux 5.5 kernel contains graphics driver code from Intel that references multi-GPU systems, with latest being code that looks like it has been designed to handle an Intel integrated GPU alongside a discrete graphics accelerator.

    In effect, this could mean a PC could use both the graphics integrated into a modern Core processor alongside Intel's own discrete graphics cards which are set to show up next year.

    It could also herald support for two Xe graphics cards to be used in tandem, or for said graphics cards to have two GPUs put together on one card.

Multi-GPU Xe Support For Intel Linux Graphics Driver

  • Multi-GPU Xe Support For Intel Linux Graphics Driver Bared, Promises Awesome Capabilities

    Intel has revealed more details on the driver it is currently working on for Linux 5.5. In particular, the chip manufacturer is focused on the multi-GPU capabilities for its Gen 12 and Xegraphics solutions. Discrete and integrated graphics will be among the solutions’ capabilities.

    In August, Phoronix already provided a glimpse of the Intel Linux graphics driver for multiple devices. The tech website explained the multi-GPU support is utilized for integrated graphics that would come with a discreet Xe GPU.

    In a statement, Phoronix said the i195 driver is capable of handling the discrete graphics system, which can be integrated with the discrete GPU. For multiple discrete GPU set-ups, the company did not have lofty expectations on the user-space side.

Intel's upcoming discrete video cards

  • Linux driver code points toward multi-GPU support in Intel's upcoming discrete video cards

    In context: Though we all know that Intel is working on its own discrete GPU by this point, details regarding its specs and unique features are still remarkably scarce. Without official details from Intel, we've been left to rely on rumors, speculation, and various other minor hints or clues.
    Yesterday, one such clue may have been spotted by Phoronix. The site noticed some intriguing code in the latest Linux graphics drivers from Intel. The code in question points toward the possibility of multi-GPU processing with Intel's upcoming discrete "Xe" cards.

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