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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary

    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here.

    2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.

  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)

    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).

  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree.

    Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

AMD Radeon VII Linux Performance vs. NVIDIA Gaming On Ubuntu For Q2'2019

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It's been three months now since the AMD Radeon VII 7nm "Vega 20" graphics card was released and while we hopefully won't be waiting much longer for Navi to make its debut, for the time being this is the latest and great AMD Radeon consumer graphics card -- priced at around $700 USD. Here are some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon VII on Linux and compared to various high-end NVIDIA graphics cards while all testing happened from Ubuntu 19.04.

Fortunately, the open-source Radeon VII Linux support is in fact in great shape. There was some confusion for some weeks and a lack of benchmarks recently since I had been unable to get my Vega 20 graphics card running reliably. Under different OpenGL/Vulkan workloads and even some desktop tasks, the graphics card would freeze and spewing from dmesg would most often be a load of VMC page faults and other errors stemming from AMDGPU. But after a lot of testing, ultimately it was figured out the graphics card became defective in some manner. The original card was a pre-launch Radeon VII review sample and was my lone Vega 20 GPU but has now been fortunately replaced by AMD. I received a new Radeon VII last week and since then has been under near constant load/testing. This new card has been working out well and I haven't encountered any issues with this retail card, unlike the woes I experienced with the original VII a few weeks after launch. It was a bit surprising the original Radeon VII failed especially without having done any over-clocking to it (granted was pushed very hard for a few weeks with all of my benchmarking workloads), but whatever the case, this retail Radeon VII is working out fine on Ubuntu 19.04 and various kernel/Mesa upgrades.

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An Early Look At Some PHP 7.4 Performance Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The initial PHP 7.4 Alpha 1 release is just two weeks away already... Curious about the performance of this yearly update to PHP7, I ran some benchmarks on the latest development code as of this morning compared to the earlier PHP7 releases and even PHP-8.0 that is in development on Git master.

PHP 7.4 has been working on preloading options, short closures, custom object serialization, FFI work that didn't end up making it for PHP 7.3, the null coalescing assignment operator has been added, and various other changes. The PHP 7.4 alpha releases are supposed to kick off on 6 June while the betas will then fire up starting on 18 July followed by at least six release candidates beginning at the end of August. If all goes well, PHP 7.4.0 will make its debut around the end of November or early December. PHP-7.4 has been branched since January while PHP-8.0 development is on Git master for that next major PHP8 release with JIT functionality and other changes in the works.

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Performance Impact of Serious CPU Defects

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
Security

Mesa 19.0.5 and Mesa 19.1 RC3

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • mesa 19.0.5
    Hi List,
    
    I'd like to announce the availability of mesa 19.0.5. Just as a reminder the
    plan is to have one more release of the 19.0 series in two weeks, but that is
    subject to change base on the 19.1 release progress.
    
    Things have slowed back down from the last release, which is good for this late
    in the series. No one area has received too much work, with a little bit
    sprinkled in here and there in both core code and drivers.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (2):
          nir: Fix nir_opt_idiv_const when negatives are involved
          nir: Fix clone of nir_variable state slots
    
    Charmaine Lee (2):
          st/mesa: purge framebuffers with current context after unbinding winsys buffers
          mesa: unreference current winsys buffers when unbinding winsys buffers
    
    Dylan Baker (5):
          docs: Add SHA256 sums for mesa 19.0.4
          cherry-ignore: add patches for panfrost
          cherry-ignore: Add more 19.1 patches
          bump version to 19.0.5
          docs: Add release notes for 19.0.5
    
    Eric Engestrom (1):
          meson: expose glapi through osmesa
    
    Gert Wollny (2):
          softpipe/buffer: load only as many components as the the buffer resource type provides
          Revert "softpipe/buffer: load only as many components as the the buffer resource type provides"
    
    Ian Romanick (1):
          Revert "nir: add late opt to turn inot/b2f combos back to bcsel"
    
    Jason Ekstrand (3):
          intel/fs/ra: Only add dest interference to sources that exist
          intel/fs/ra: Stop adding RA interference to too many SENDS nodes
          anv: Only consider minSampleShading when sampleShadingEnable is set
    
    Józef Kucia (1):
          radv: clear vertex bindings while resetting command buffer
    
    Kenneth Graunke (1):
          i965: Fix memory leaks in brw_upload_cs_work_groups_surface().
    
    Leo Liu (1):
          winsys/amdgpu: add VCN JPEG to no user fence group
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (1):
          anv: Use corresponding type from the vector allocation
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          st/mesa: fix 2 crashes in st_tgsi_lower_yuv
    
    Nanley Chery (1):
          anv: Fix some depth buffer sampling cases on ICL+
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (1):
          radv: add a workaround for Monster Hunter World and LLVM 7&8
    
    
  • Mesa 19.0.5 Released As The Series Approaches The End

    Mesa 19.0.5 is now available as what is expected to be the second to the last release in the Mesa 19.0 series.

    Mesa 19.0.5 has just around two dozen fixes, mostly all minor items. There are random fixes throughout ranging from NIR and other core components to the Intel ANV / i96t5 / Radeon RADV drivers.

  • mesa 19.1.0-rc3
    Hello, list.
    
    The third release candidate for Mesa 19.1.0 is now available.
    
    Remind that right now there are two bugs blocking the final release:
    
    #110302 - [bisected][regression] piglit egl-create-pbuffer-surface and egl-gl-colorspace regressions
    #110357 - [REGRESSION] [BISECTED] [OpenGL CTS] cts-runner --type=gl46 fails in new attempted "41" configuration
    
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (2):
          nir: Fix nir_opt_idiv_const when negatives are involved
          nir: Fix clone of nir_variable state slots
    
    Charmaine Lee (2):
          st/mesa: purge framebuffers with current context after unbinding winsys buffers
          mesa: unreference current winsys buffers when unbinding winsys buffers
    
    Dave Airlie (1):
          glsl: init packed in more constructors.
    
    Eric Engestrom (2):
          util/os_file: always use the 'grow' mechanism
          meson: expose glapi through osmesa
    
    Gert Wollny (1):
          Revert "softpipe/buffer: load only as many components as the the buffer resource type provides"
    
    Ian Romanick (1):
          Revert "nir: add late opt to turn inot/b2f combos back to bcsel"
    
    Jason Ekstrand (5):
          intel/fs/ra: Only add dest interference to sources that exist
          intel/fs/ra: Stop adding RA interference to too many SENDS nodes
          anv: Emulate texture swizzle in the shader when needed
          anv: Stop forcing bindless for images
          anv: Only consider minSampleShading when sampleShadingEnable is set
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (2):
          cherry-ignore: radeonsi: update buffer descriptors in all contexts after buffer invalidation
          Update version to 19.1.0-rc3
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (4):
          nir: fix lower_non_uniform_access pass
          vulkan/overlay-layer: fix cast errors
          vulkan/overlay: fix truncating error on 32bit platforms
          nir: lower_non_uniform_access: iterate over instructions safely
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: remove old_va parameter from si_rebind_buffer by remembering offsets
    
    Nanley Chery (1):
          anv: Fix some depth buffer sampling cases on ICL+
    
    Neha Bhende (1):
          draw: fix memory leak introduced 7720ce32a
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (1):
          radv: add a workaround for Monster Hunter World and LLVM 7&8
    
  • Mesa 19.1-RC3 Brings NIR, Vulkan Driver Fixes & Other Changes

    If all goes well the Mesa 19.1 release will be happening in the next week or two. But for those wanting to help test this open-source graphics driver stack, Mesa 19.1-RC3 was released today as the newest weekly release candidate.

    Mesa 19.1-RC3 isn't particularly exciting but brings a handful of changes throughout. Most of the changes this week pertain to fix-ups with the NIR code, the Intel ANV and Radeon RADV Vulkan drivers, a few core Mesa/GLSL changes, a lone RadeonSI code change, and some other minor work. The changes aren't too noticeable for end-users but at least on the RADV front is a workaround for the Monster Hunter World game when using LLVM 7/8 AMDGPU code.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 Benchmarks On AMD EPYC - Big Speed-Ups Over RHEL7

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

Since the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 at the start of May we've been running various benchmarks of this latest enterprise Linux platform. Our tests to date have been with Intel Xeon hardware where it's been performing well and a nice speed-up over RHEL 7 with modern Xeon Scalable CPUs. Similarly, AMD EPYC is also much faster with RHEL 8.0 thanks to the much newer Linux kernel, compiler, and other software updates.

AMD EPYC screams on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 compared to RHEL 7.6. The modern AMD server platform performs much better thanks to the GCC 8.2 compiler replacing the older GCC 4.8 compiler that came well before any Zen support. The Linux 4.18 kernel is also a blessing for newer AMD (and Intel/IBM/ARM) hardware compared to the heavily-patched Linux 3.10 kernel of RHEL7. RHEL 8.0 also shifted over to the MQ-Deadline scheduler for SATA SSDs compared to the non-MQ deadline scheduler and the plethora of upgraded packages compared to RHEL7 also means a big deal for performance at large.

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Graphics: RISC-V, WebRender, SVT-AV1/Intel, AMD and X.Org

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • SiFive RISC-V SoCs Can Now Be Paired With A GPU... Imagination's PowerVR

    If you want a SiFive SoC for the royalty-free, open-source RISC-V architecture it's now possible to pair it with graphics. Unfortunately, the graphics option is about as far from open-source as possible.

  • WebRender newsletter #45

    WebRender is a GPU based 2D rendering engine for web written in Rust, currently powering Mozilla’s research web browser servo and on its way to becoming Firefox‘s rendering engine.

  • Mozilla GFX: Graphics Team ships WebRender MVP!

    After many months of hard work and preparation, I’m pleased to announce the general availability of WebRender for selected Windows 10 devices. WebRender is a major rewrite of the Firefox rendering architecture using the same kind of GPU-based acceleration techniques used by games.

  • SVT-AV1 0.5 Released As Intel's Speedy AV1 Video Encoder

    While we have been reporting on and benchmarking the Intel SVT video encoders since February, they were only officially announced last month and this Sunday marks their first tagged release for the AV1 encoder in the form of SVT-AV1 0.5.0.

    SVT-AV1 0.5 is easily one of the fastest AV1 CPU-based video encoders and has been performing excellent in our tests, including continued daily benchmarks of it in keeping track of its performance.

  • Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.4 Released With Fixes & Improvements

    Less than one month after releasing the Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.3, the Intel team maintaining "IGC" today released version 1.0.4.

    The only changes to this LLVM-based graphics compiler for Intel GEN graphics hardware are "minor fixes and improvements."

  • RadeonSI Primitive Culling Lands In Mesa 19.2

    The past few months AMD's Marek Olšák has been working on primitive culling support for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver and last week that code was merged into the Mesa 19.2 development code.

    Marek has been working on primitive culling via asynchronous compute prior to the vertex shader process to eliminate geometry that ends up being invisible. Marek found that this functionality helps in workloads like the workstation ParaView software we use as part of our OpenGL test suite.

  • X.Org's XDC2019 Issues Call For Proposals On Wayland, Mesa, X.Org, Etc

    X.Org's annual event, the X.Org Developers' Conference, is running like a well-oiled machined these days. While there are still months to go until XDC2019 in Montreal, a Call for Proposals has been issued for those wishing to speak at this annual gathering that pertains to Wayland, Mesa, libinput, Cairo, and related components as well, yes, the X.Org Server.

A Look At The MDS Cost On Xeon, EPYC & Xeon Total Impact Of Affected CPU Vulnerabilities

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Graphics/Benchmarks

This weekend I posted a number of benchmarks looking at the performance impact of the new MDS/Zombieload vulnerabilities that also included a look at the overall cost of Spectre/Meltdown/L1TF/MDS on Intel desktop CPUs and AMD CPUs (Spectre). In this article are similar benchmarks but turning the attention now to Intel Xeon hardware and also comparing those total mitigation costs against AMD EPYC with its Spectre mitigations.

This article offers a look at the MDS/Zombieload mitigations on a 1st Gen Skylake Xeon Scalable server as well as a Kabylake Xeon E3 server for reference. Following that is a look at the total CPU vulnerability mitigation costs for 1st Gen Xeon Scalable, 2nd Gen Xeon Scalable (Cascade Lake), and an AMD EPYC 2P server as well for its Spectre mitigations.

As expected given Intel's guidance last week of their latest Xeon processors being mitigated for MDS, indeed, the dual Xeon Platinum 8280 Cascade Lake server reported it was not affected by the MDS mitigations and thus not enabled. So for the MDS tests up first it's just some reference results using a dual Xeon Gold 6138 Skylake server running Ubuntu 19.04 with the Linux 5.0 patched kernel and reference results side-by-side for a separate Xeon E3-1275 v6 server.

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The Performance Impact Of MDS / Zombieload Plus The Overall Cost Now Of Spectre/Meltdown/L1TF/MDS

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The past few days I've begun exploring the performance implications of the new Microarchitectural Data Sampling "MDS" vulnerabilities now known more commonly as Zombieload. As I shared in some initial results, there is a real performance hit to these mitigations. In this article are more MDS/Zombieload mitigation benchmarks on multiple systems as well as comparing the overall performance impact of the Meltdown/Spectre/Foreshadow/Zombieload mitigations on various Intel CPUs and also AMD CPUs where relevant.

While disabling Hyper Threading now is recommended by multiple parties if running untrusted code on the system, even if keeping HT/SMT active, the MDS mitigations do provide a very noticeable performance hit in many real and synthetic workloads with the updated Linux kernel patches paired with the newest Intel CPU microcode. Like the other mitigations to this point, the workloads affected most are those with lots of context switches / high interactivity between kernel and user-space.

Before getting to the benchmarks looking at the overall impact of the mitigations to date, first is looking at the MDS on/off costs on various systems while keeping Hyper Threading active. These tests were done on Ubuntu 19.04 using its newest stable release updates bringing a patched Linux 5.0 kernel and the new Intel CPU microcode images.

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Phoronix on Linux 5.2, X.Org Server 1.21 and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux 5.2 To Allow P2P DMA Between Any Devices On AMD Zen Systems

    With the Linux 5.2 kernel an AMD-supplied change by AMDGPU developer Christian König allows for supporting peer-to-peer DMA between any devices on AMD Zen systems.

  • KVM Changes Make It Into Linux 5.2 With Improvements For x86, POWER, ARM

    The Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) changes were sent out on Friday of the new feature updates for the Linux 5.2 kernel that is nearing the end of its merge window. 

    New KVM material for Linux 5.2 includes support for SVE and pointer authentication for guests on the ARM front along with PMU improvements. Over in the POWER space is now the ability to directly access the POWER9 XIVE interrupt controller and various memory and performance optimizations. Meanwhile on the x86 front is support for accessing memory not backed by a struct page along with other fixes and refactoring.

  • DRM Fixes Head Into Linux 5.2 While Letting Nouveau Turing TU117 Support Slip In

    Following last week's big feature update to the DRM graphics drivers, an initial batch of "fixes" has now been merged to the early Linux 5.2 development code for these Direct Rendering Manager drivers. 

    These include AMDGPU SR-IOV fixes, Radeon R500 PLL fixes for that old X1000 series hardware, various Intel graphics driver fixes, Nouveau Turing mode-setting fixes, and fixes to several of the smaller drivers.

  • A Push Towards Firmware-less Video Decoding By Linux Kernel Media Drivers

    Veteran Linux multimedia developer Paul Kocialkowski summed up the current situation this week of many hardware platforms having a general purpose micro-controller running a non-free firmware blob for coordinating the video decoding work. It makes it easier to program with this firmware-based approach but makes the driver less free and now with recent Linux infrastructure improvements could better support dealing with the video hardware itself. 

    While the firmware-based video decoding makes the driver work easier, it's contingent upon the binary firmware blobs and the micro-controller running it doesn't necessarily be wasting energy on that task. With recent work on the Linux kernel's media interface, the kernel can now better support interfacing with hardware decoders directly. 

  • Intel Agilex Now Supported By Linux 5.2 Kernel; ARM Boards Like Jetson Nano Also Added

    Olof Johansson sent in the SoC updates on Thursday for the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window that is nearing the end. There is new SoC support for this new kernel and a number of new boards also being supported. 

  • The Open-Source / Linux Highlights From OSTS 2019

    We've had a number of articles covering the interesting news out of Intel's 2019 Open-Source Technology Summit (OSTS) held at Skamania Lodge in Stevenson, Washington. Here's a look back at the news out of the open-source event as well as some other smaller bits of information shared during the event.

  • PRIME GPU Offloading Improvement For GLXVND Merged For X.Org Server 1.21

    Work by NVIDIA to provide separate per-client vendor mappings for GLXVND were merged to X.Org Server 1.21 Git as another step towards improving the PRIME GPU offloading support when multiple GPU drivers are at play.

    The work merged on Friday is an alternative to an earlier GLX extension proposal for controlling GLXVND dispatching for PRIME GPU offloading. But this newly-merged implementation isn't contingent upon a new GLX extension. GLXVND is the vendor neutral dispatch implementation for the X.Org Server with GLX similar to the GLVND OpenGL user-space bits.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.