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Graphics/Benchmarks

10GbE Linux Networking Performance Between CentOS, Fedora, Clear Linux & Debian

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those curious how the 10 Gigabit Ethernet performance compares between current Linux distributions, here are some benchmarks we ramp up more 10GbE Linux/BSD/Windows benchmarks. This round of testing was done on two distinctly different servers while testing CentOS, Debian, Clear Linux, and Fedora.

This is the first of several upcoming 10GbE test comparisons. For those article we are testing some of the popular enterprise Linux distributions while follow-up articles will also be looking at some other distros as well as Windows Server and FreeBSD/DragonFlyBSD. CentOS 7, Debian 9.6, Clear Linux rolling, and Fedora Server 29 were the operating systems tested for this initial round.

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Graphics: AMD, NVIDIA and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDVLK Weekly Code Drop Brings A DXVK Fix, VK_EXT_debug_utils Support

    AMD developers maintaining their official Vulkan driver have carried out another weekly code push to the open-source AMDVLK code-base.

    Overall the changes for this week's worth of AMD Radeon Vulkan driver changes is fairly small, but there is a DXVK fix, one new Vulkan extension wired up, and a lot of low-level driver work.

  • NVIDIA 415.27 Linux Driver Released With GeForce RTX 2060 Support

    With NVIDIA today officially shipping the GeForce RTX 2060 as the new $349 USD Turing graphics card, the 415.27 Linux driver was released today to officially support this new graphics card.

    The GeForce RTX 2060 actually works with former 415 driver series releases, but would just be identified as a NVIDIA "Device" as opposed to the GeForce RTX 2060. The product string is now in this driver plus any other small tweaks to officially support this lowest-cost RTX Turing graphics card to date.

  • Mesa 18.3.2 release candidate

    The candidate for the Mesa 18.3.2 is now available. Currently we have:
    - 78 queued
    - 3 nominated (outstanding)
    - and 0 rejected patches

  • Mesa 18.3.2 Is Finally En Route With 78+ Changes

    It's been more than a month since the debut of Mesa 18.3 and the emergency 18.3.1 release while due the holidays and the release manager being sick, the next point release fell off the tracks. Mesa 18.3.2 is now being crafted and should be out in the next few days. Given the time since the previous release, Mesa 18.3.2 is heavy on fixes.

    Emil Velikov announced the release today of Mesa 18.3.2 RC1 and plans for officially releasing this point update in the next day or two. This release candidate has 78 patches queued over the prior update.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760/960/1060 / RTX 2060 Linux Gaming & Compute Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 is shipping today as the most affordable Turing GPU option to date at $349 USD. Last week we posted our initial GeForce RTX 2060 Linux review and followed-up with more 1080p and 1440p Linux gaming benchmarks after having more time with the card. In this article is a side-by-side performance comparison of the GeForce RTX 2060 up against the GTX 1060 Pascal, GTX 960 Maxwell, and GTX 760 Kepler graphics cards. Not only are we looking at the raw OpenGL, Vulkan, and OpenCL/CUDA compute performance between these four generations, but also the power consumption and performance-per-Watt.

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Phoronix on Linux and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Sends Out First Batch Of Display/Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 5.1 Kernel

    While the Linux 5.0 kernel won't even debut as stable until around the end of February, as is standard practice, it's open season for new feature improvements of the changes developers want to end up queuing into the "-next" branches ahead of the Linux 5.1 cycle. The Intel open-source driver developers on Monday sent in their initial batch of graphics driver changes for this next kernel cycle.

    Rodrigo Vivi of the Intel Open-Source Technology Center sent in their initial Linux 5.1 Intel DRM driver material today to DRM-Next for its vetting until the Linux 5.1 merge window at the start of March.

  • Lczero Neural Network Chess Benchmarks With OpenCL Radeon vs. NVIDIA

    Yesterday I posted a number of Lczero chess engine benchmarks on NVIDIA GPUs using its OpenCL back-end as well as its CUDA+cuDNN back-end, which offered massive performance gains compared to CL on the many tested NVIDIA GPUs. With the CUDA+cuDNN code performing so much better than OpenCL, some wondered whether NVIDIA was intentionally gimping their OpenCL performance. Well, here are results side-by-side now with Radeon GPUs on OpenCL.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Picks Up Memory Budget Information For Mesa 19.0

    With Mesa 19.0 entering its feature freeze this week, the race is on for developers to land their last minute additions to this next quarterly installment of Mesa. Valve developer Samuel Pitoiset has landed support in the Radeon "RADV" Vulkan driver for the new memory budget extension.

  • VKD3D Tapping Vulkan Transform Feedback For Direct3D 12 Stream Output

    Wine's VKD3D project for working towards Direct3D 12 support mapped atop the Vulkan graphics API now has patches for utilizing transform feedback in order to implement Direct3D Stream-Output functionality.

    Similar to the DXVK support that was added last year when VK_EXT_transform_feedback was first introduced, VKD3D now has patches pending for similar Direct3D Stream Out functionality by utilizing this Vulkan extension.

PlaidML Deep Learning Framework Benchmarks With OpenCL On NVIDIA & AMD GPUs

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Pointed out by a Phoronix reader a few days ago and added to the Phoronix Test Suite is the PlaidML deep learning framework that can run on CPUs using BLAS or also on GPUs and other accelerators via OpenCL. Here are our initial benchmarks of this OpenCL-based deep learning framework that is now being developed as part of Intel's AI Group and tested across a variety of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards.

Over the weekend I carried out a wide variety of benchmarks with PlaidML and its OpenCL back-end ofr both NVIDIA and AMD graphics cards. The Radeon tests were done with ROCm 2.0 OpenCL and it was working out fine there without any troubles while also working fine with NVIDIA's OpenCL driver stack. Benchmarks were done with a variety of neural networks, both training and inference, etc.

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Graphics and Games: Vulkan, Godot, Hero of the Kingdom III and Rogue Empire

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Vulkan 1.1.98 Brings A Dozen Fixes

    Last weekend there was the Vulkan 1.1.97 specification update with five new extensions including some notable ones like memory priority and buffer device address while out today is the much more mundane Vulkan 1.1.98.

    The Vulkan 1.1.98 update doesn't feature any new extensions but has some basic fixes and clarifications to this graphics/compute API specification and associated documentation. Of the roughly dozen changes, no real standouts but just lots of ongoing improvements.

  • Godot 4.0 Game Engine To Work On Vulkan Port, Big Rendering Improvements

    While Godot 3.1 isn't even out yet, our eyes are already looking forward to Godot 4.0 for 2D and 3D rendering improvements, but most notably Vulkan API support. 

    Godot Engine lead developer Juan Linietsky has tweeted his rendering TODO list moving forward for this increasingly-used open-source game engine. The biggest item on the list is porting to Vulkan for Godot 4.0, which doesn't yet have a release timeline. Other Godot 4.0 rendering changes anticipated are shader cache support and the ability to have bindless textures while not altering the engine's current rendering design too much.

  • Hero of the Kingdom III should now work on newer Linux distributions

    Hero of the Kingdom III, a casual RPG from Lonely Troops released back in August last year but it seems it came with a few issues for those on newer distributions.

    In a post on Steam, the developer did note originally about the limited Linux support. Earlier this month, they updated it to replace the older 32bit version with a 64bit version which seems to have solved the problems. Nice to see some good support there!

  • Rogue Empire, a dungeon-crawling RPG is leaving Early Access later this month with Linux support

    Rogue Empire, a dungeon-crawling RPG from Portal Entertainment is ready to leave Early Access on January 25th.

GCC vs. Clang Compiler Performance On NVIDIA Xavier's Carmel ARMv8 Cores

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since receiving the powerful NVIDIA Jetson AGX Xavier with its ARMv8 Carmel cores on this Tegra194 SoC a while back, it's been quite a fun developer board for benchmarking and various Linux tests. One of the areas I was curious about was whether GCC or Clang would generate faster code for this high performance ARM SoC, so here are some benchmarks.

This CPU compiler benchmarking was done with the NVIDIA Jetson AGX Xavier while running the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS default L4T file-system and comparing the default GCC 7.3.0 against LLVM Clang 6.0 compiler options as officially supported by Ubuntu LTS Bionic Beaver. These are also the compiler versions supported by NVIDIA with their Tegra software on this Linux 4 Tegra sample file-system. The NVIDIA Tegra Xavier (T194) SoC as a reminder has eight "Carmel" ARMv8 CPU cores that are custom designed by NVIDIA. Tests on other more common ARMv8 cores with these different compilers will be coming up in future Phoronix articles with Clang 8 and GCC 9 releasing later this quarter. Rounding out this powerful Jetson AGX Xavier is the Volta GPU with 512 CUDA cores, 16GB of LPDDR4 system memory, 32GB of eMMC storage, two NVDLA deep learning accelerators, and a 7-way vision processor, granted those aren't the focus of today's testing.

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Graphics and Games Leftovers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • FOSDEM 19 Is Happening In Just Three Weeks, There Will Once Again Be A Graphics Room

    If you are able to make it to Brussels, Belgium in three weeks, the wonderful FOSDEM event is taking place as easily one of the best open-source/Linux events in the world and it's free to attend.

    FOSDEM 2019 is taking place 2 to 3 February this year and once again at the ULB Solbosch Campus in Brussels. This year there are keynotes about blockchain, cloud, and other hot topics. All of the usual main tracks and developer rooms are again taking place.

  • SDL Picks Up An Initial OpenSL ES Implementation For Android

    Helping to make the SDL cross-platform library more attractive for mobile/Android developers, the latest SDL2 code has an initial OpenSL ES implementation. 

    OpenSL ES is the Khronos Group's effort as an industry-standard sound library for embedded hardware while offering up 3D positional audio support, optional integration with OpenMAX, audio effects, and other advanced sound capabilities. 

  • SuperTuxKart, the open source Mario Kart clone, achieves beta status with network support

    While I appreciate hardware makers and game developers pushing the boundaries of what gaming can be, it is important to remember one important fact -- fun trumps all. In other words, it doesn't matter how much processing power a computer or console has, or how beautiful a game's graphics are, if it isn't fun to play! That's probably a big reason why retro-gaming is so popular these days.

Graphics: Canonical's Mir, Mesa 19.0

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mir Made Good Progress Over The Holidays With Porting To Debian & Alpine, ARM Mali

    Canonical's Mir display server is off to a good start for 2019 with a lot of work and pet projects being worked on over the holidays by the developers involved.

    Lead Mir developer Alan Griffiths shared some of the recent Mir accomplishments for this Wayland-supported display stack:

    - Progress in landing Mir within Debian, currently targeting Debian experimental.

    - Getting Mir available in Alpine Linux and as part of that allowing Mir to work with the Musl libc library as an alternative to Glibc.

  • Mesa 19.0 Picks Up Intel NIR Caching Patches To Help With Shader Re-Compiles

    With just days to go until the Mesa 19.0 branching and feature freeze, it's a busy time on Mesa Git with developers working to land their latest changes into this next quarterly feature release.

    Jason Ekstrand, the lead developer of Intel's "ANV" open-source Vulkan driver at their Open-Source Technology Center, landed a set of patches overnight around NIR caching.

    With adding NIR caching support to the driver's pipeline cache, the end result of this latest work is enabling caching of pre-lowered NIR. Caching at this lower-level, Ekstrand explained, should help with faster shader recompiles happening due to state changes.

1080p/1440p Linux Gaming Performance For Radeon RX 590/Vega & NVIDIA 1060/1070/1080/2060/2070

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Complementing the benchmarks done earlier this week in the our NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Linux review, here are more benchmarks of the GeForce RTX 2060 $349 USD graphics card that is beginning to ship next week. This article offers up a plethora of 1920 x 1080 and 2560 x 1440 Linux gaming benchmarks while providing the very latest driver performance results on the AMD Radeon RX 590, RX Vega 56, and RX Vega 64 while on the NVIDIA side was the GeForce GTX 1060/1070/1080 and RTX 2060/2070 graphics cards.

The RTX 2060 Linux review featured a number of 1440p/4K results while this article is focused on the 1080p and 1440p Linux gaming performance with the range of eight graphics cards tested. On the NVIDIA driver side was the 395.25 driver atop the Linux 4.20 kernel. On the Radeon side was the latest Mesa 19.0-devel state built against LLVM 8.0 SVN via the Padoka PPA as of this week, offering a look at the near-final Mesa 19.0 RADV/RadeonSI performance with the 19.0 code entering its feature freeze next week.

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