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New Red Hat FOSS Survey ("The State of Enterprise Open Source")

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  • Survey says: Enterprise open source is inventing the future of software

    We don’t need to ask if enterprises are using open source. They are, and we know because we’re helping many of them with their open source journeys. But how do they think about open source, why do they choose it, and what do they intend to do next? Well, those are questions we wanted to pose to IT leaders—so we did. Today we’re excited to share our findings in a first-ever report conducted by Illuminas and sponsored by Red Hat, "The State of Enterprise Open Source."

  • Red Hat survey finds we're living in an open-source world [Ed: But Red Hat sold itself to a proprietary software company and had considered Microsoft also]

    Some people still insist open source and Linux are fighting a war against the evils of proprietary software. Actually, we won that war years ago. The latest Red Hat State of Enterprise Open Source report, based on 950 interviews with worldwide enterprise IT leaders, makes that crystal clear. Only a mere 1% of enterprises dismiss the importance of open-source software.

    [...]

    Historically, businesses turn to open source software because it's cheaper: 33% of enterprise users count it's lower total cost of ownership (TCO) as open-source's chief benefit (but "enterprise open source is increasingly used not because it's cheaper -- though it often is -- but because it's genuinely better software." And 29% turn to open source because it gives them access to the latest innovations. For example, big data, artificial intelligence, and machine learning are all built almost entirely on open-source software.

    Right behind those, when asked what open source's top benefits were, respondents pointed to better security, higher quality software, access to support, and the power to customize software.

    Yet another reason to embrace open source, according to a New York-based IT leader, was: "For us, this is our way to become more agile. That's our biggest push. We don't want dependency upon these proprietary companies. We want those shackles to be broken." Simultaneously, "We still want support because we're not ready to take off the guardrails."

    On the other hand, security remains a concern: 38% of those surveyed identified security as the top barrier. That's because, unless you keep on top of open-source code, you may miss security patches and fixes. The most well known such case was when Equifax exposed 143 million Americans' credit data, thanks to not updating Apache Struts.

Other stories coming now, here's one by Sean Michael Kerner

  • What Is the State of Enterprise Open-Source Software?

    Open source has evolved over the past two decades into a cornerstone of the modern IT landscape.

    At the core of the open-source revolution is the concept of enterprise open source, which is software that is backed and supported in a way that makes it easier for enterprises to consume and use in a stable, predictable manner. One of the leading vendors in the enterprise open-source space has long been Red Hat, which has a growing list of enterprise open-source offerings, including its namesake Linux platform, developer, cloud and container offerings.

    On April 16, Red Hat released its annual State of Enterprise Open Source report, gauging the landscape for adoption and usage, based on 950 interviews with IT leaders worldwide. In this eWEEK Data Points article, we look at some of the highlights of report.

Coverage by Adarsh Verma

  • Open Source Is Important To 99% Enterprises, Red Hat Survey Finds

    For many enterprises, open source technologies are becoming an integral part of their businesses and the way they do things. Technology giants like Google and Microsoft are also acknowledging the power of open source — Google Cloud’s recent partnership with companies like Elastic, MongoDB, Redis Labs, Neo4j, and Confluent is a testament to the same.

    But what about the actual extent of this open source revolution? Is it limited to just a bunch of top-tier companies that get just enough press coverage to bring their open source endeavors into the limelight? Well, Linux giant Red Hat’s “The State of Enterprise Open Source” is here to answer some important questions.

Another new survey

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    Internet of Things developers are focused on cloud platforms, home automation, and industrial deployments with most devices based on ARM, according to an Eclipse Foundation survey.

    Eclipse Foundation surveyed 1,700 developers and found that they are increasingly working on commercial IoT projects.

By TFIR

  • Enterprises Are Driving The Adoption Of Open Source: Red Hat Report

    While ‘open source’ may still be an unknown term among the masses, the enterprise world has gone full monty with open source.

    I have not met a single enterprise customer that doesn’t use open source. In fact, we are reaching a point where people are not using the term open source as much, as that’s the way the default way to write software.

    I recall my interview with the former Cloud Foundry Foundation CEO, Sam Ramji, who said that within the next five years, we may not even use the term open source. That’s actually already happening.

More on the Red Hat study

  • Open source use grows 68% as corporations buy into the software solution

    Developers don't want a corporation's influence on code, evidenced by the tension created over Google's use of Java. The debate was brought on by Oracle after it acquired Java creator Sun Microsystems.

    Open source affords companies "genuinely better software" and a lower cost of ownership, according to the report. It also allows companies to embrace more agile approaches to solving issues, as opposed to relying on proprietary companies.

    The meshing of corporate culture with open source communities could also boost DevOps in organizations. Together open source and DevOps have the ability to co-create solutions while monitoring it and offering patches for security flaws

  • Enterprise Embrace of Open Source Quickens

    Not to worry, Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) asserts in its inaugural survey of enterprise open source development, concluding that open-source software has “permeated the technology landscape,” often replacing proprietary code via commercial Linux distributions like Red Hat’s.

    “Enterprise open source today can also take the place of proprietary software for many different purposes from virtualization to message buses to application servers,” Red Hat noted in blog post describing the survey findings.

    “Open source is also helping to define and shape new approaches to infrastructure from containerization to software-defined-storage,” the soon-to-be-IBM unit added.

Use of Enterprise Open Source Software is Surging

  • Use of Enterprise Open Source Software is Surging

    Industry use of enterprise open source software will be close to parity with proprietary software use – which is waning – within just two years, according to a major new survey by Red Hat.

    The report found that 68 percent of businesses have increased their use of open source enterprise tools over the past 12 months. Fifty-nine percent plan to do so in the coming year.

Open source software adoption is accelerating in the enterprise

  • Why open source software adoption is accelerating in the enterprise

    For business applications, open source software is quite often the first choice. While early proponents may have focused on lowering costs, an ecosystem of integrations and developer skill sets centered around open source solutions have solidified its importance in the enterprise. Some 69% of IT professionals indicate that open source software either extremely or very important, according to Red Hat's first State of Enterprise Open Source survey, published Tuesday.

    Of the 950 IT professionals surveyed, only 1% indicated that open source software was "not at all important."

    Adoption of open source is likewise expected to continue with equitable levels of enthusiasm. In the last 12 months, 68% of respondents reported an increase in the use of open source software, while 29% reported no change. For the next 12 months, 59% expect an increase, while 39% expect no change.

Open-source enterprise software slinger Red Hat

  • Open-source enterprise software slinger Red Hat bravely reveals that IT bosses love open-source enterprise software

    Red Hat, now a part of Big Blue, on Tuesday released its first annual survey on the State of Enterprise Open Source, a statistical snapshot of what IT leaders think about Linux, Kubernetes and the like.

    The upshot is entirely unsurprising, dare we say predictable, for a company that sells... open source software to enterprises. Asked to rate the importance of enterprise open source (EOS) as it pertains to their organization's enterprise infrastructure software strategy, fully 69 per cent said it's either extremely or very important. Only 1 per cent said it's not important at all.

    About as many of respondents say open source usage has grown within their organization in the past 12 months. Some 68 per cent said as much, with 29 per cent anticipating usage will stay the same and only 3 per cent expecting a decline.

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