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OSS

Education and Open Access

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OSS
  • UNICEF Seeks World-Changing Open Source Technologies

    United Nations to fund startups to develop open source tech to improve the lives of vulnerable children and civilians

  • UCLA just open-sourced a powerful new image-detection algorithm

    Image recognition has become increasingly critical in applications ranging from smartphones to driverless cars, and on Wednesday UCLA opened up to the public a new algorithm that promises big gains.

    The Phase Stretch Transform algorithm is a physics-inspired computational approach to processing images and information that can help computers "see" features of objects that aren't visible using standard imaging techniques. It could be used to detect an LED lamp's internal structure, for example -- something that would be obscured to conventional techniques by the brightness of its light. It can also distinguish distant stars that would normally be invisible in astronomical images, UCLA said.

  • Open-source textbooks gain in push for college affordability [Ed: same as below]
  • Open-Source Textbooks Gain in Push for College Affordability

    The standard textbook for Fundamentals of General Chemistry I at the University of Connecticut has a list price of $303. For students who use the version professor Edward Neth is preparing for the fall semester, the cost will be zero.

    An early adopter of open source textbooks, Neth said he turned to the new technology out of frustration with spiraling prices of commercial textbooks.

    "It's seeing the costs go up every semester and almost feeling powerless," Neth said.

  • Zika articles made open-source to accelerate research

    Nature, the Lancet and many other medical publishers and researchers have announced that all Zika-related scientific articles will be published freely in the wake of the recent outbreak.

Open Source Effort Targets Faster Nets, Storage

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OSS

Networking is becoming a bottleneck as enterprises store, move and sift through vast quantities of structured and unstructured data from a growing list of sources. In an effort to accelerate adoption of network virtualization, a new open source effort seeks to provide a high-performance input/output services framework for developing the next generation of virtualized network and storage software.

Read more

Also: Linux Foundation lines up big guns for open I/O standard push

Rackspace Debuts Red Hat OpenStack For Private Clouds

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Red Hat
OSS

Rackspace may have put OpenStack on the map, but Thursday it introduced to its private cloud portfolio another vendor's version of the open-source technology.

The managed cloud company out of San Antonio is making Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform available to customers and partners deploying private clouds either in Rackspace data centers or on their own premises, according to Bryan Thompson, senior director of product management for Rackspace's OpenStack practice.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Researchers release open source code for powerful image detection algorithm

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OSS

It is available for free download on two open source platforms, Github and Matlab File Exchange. Making it available as open source code will allow researchers to work together to study, use and improve the algorithm, and to freely modify and distribute it. It also will enable users to incorporate the technology into computer vision and pattern recognition applications and other image-processing applications.

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Open source in the enterprise brings opportunities and challenges

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OSS

The final challenge open source presents relates to staff skills. Simply put, open source requires a higher level of technical talent than traditional proprietary solutions, because there’s a world of difference between building a solution and operating someone else’s solution. The latter is the world of certifications and cookie-cutter solutions; the former requires creativity, self-reliance, and technical chops. Newly-hired technical employees tend to come with open source experience and an inclination toward self-generated solutions, while many long-term IT employees are much more comfortable with a vendor-centric world. However, most organizations can’t (and shouldn’t) do a wholesale replacement of personnel. So IT organizations face the task of reskilling existing employees, integrating new staff, all while architecting new systems and ripping out old ones.

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VCs who miss the point of open source shouldn't fund it

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OSS

The errors highlighted here are not merely mistakes; rather, they reveal a worldview. People who believe that Apache is a competitor, OSI approves licenses that permit monopolization, Red Hat is a business that’s succeeded through artificial scarcity, and open source communities with diverse agendas are "broken" are not the people you want in your new open source business.

They will try to persuade you to secure software patents so that they have an asset to trade when you fail; they will eject you from your own company when you try to hold true to software freedom principles; and they will treat your business as a failure if all it does is earn a decent living for you and your employees. You may want to grow your open source-based business another way.

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Cisco Openwashing

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OSS
  • Cisco's Open Source Moves Not All Altruistic

    Cisco announced today that it's open sourcing software for Remote PHY devices and making the project -- dubbed OpenRPD -- available to operators and vendors worldwide.

    Sounds good, right? Sure. But it also sounds like a not-so-subtle attempt by Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) to maintain its iron grip on the cable CMTS/CCAP business. (See Cisco Open Sources Remote PHY Device.)

  • Cisco Open Sources Remote PHY Device

    Cable operators around the world are faced with pressures to provide higher bandwidth transport for Internet, video and voice services.. Most operators are opting for standardized, digital and fiber-based solutions that will help them reduce costs and future-proof their technology to support network demands.

    Several years ago, the cable industry led the effort for a Converged Cable Access Platform (CCAP), to simplify cable headend operations and to move operators toward service convergence and IP video. CCAP combines edge QAM and cable modem termination system (CMTS) functions into one unit to help operators reduce power and space.

Open source demonstrates the future of work

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OSS

Open source communities and projects are examples of non-standard work structures that are successfully productive while existing outside typical paradigms for "work." OpenSSL, for example, is an incredibly important software library that serves a large majority of websites across the web. The authors of the software, ranging from one time collaborators to continuous contributors, have collectively forged arguably the most important networking encryption library to date, and they've done it outside traditional business models. The software is a the result of effort from a diverse community of volunteers working on "their own time," rather than on the rigid production model of a proprietary software development firm.

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Systemd 229 Released With Many Changes, DNS Resolver Now Fully Supported

The last major systemd update was all the way back in November, which is rather strange considering their normal frequent releases, but that changed today with the release of systemd 229. Systemd 229 has been released and given the span since systemd 228, this is a very hearty release. First up, the systemd-resolved DNS resolver is no longer experimental but is now fully-supported and offers a ton of new features, including DNSSEC support. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Free live-booting distro DVD with LU&D #162
    A brand new issue of Linux User & Developer hits the high street and the app stores today – we’ve done something a little different for you this time.
  • Russian government to switch to desktop Linux?
    The Russian government is reported to be contemplating dropping Microsoft Windows and adopting Linux as the operating system for agency PCs according to its internet czar, German Klimenko.
  • The Linux Foundation's big plan to speed up storage, networking
    The Linux Foundation continues to think big. It became a hub for containers by spearheading the Open Container Project and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, and it has pushed to make APIs self-standardizing. Now, it's kicked off yet another industry-wide open source initiative: the Fast Data Project (Fd.io). The idea of "an I/O services framework for the next wave of network and storage software" (per the Foundation) may not sound as vital as protecting core Internet infrastructure or making it simpler for Web server admins to support HTTPS. But on closer inspection, FD.io is in line with the Foundation's ambitions to nurture the future Web.
  • ownCloud Desktop Client Updated with HiDPI Improvements, Better Syncing
    Today, February 10, 2016, ownCloud Inc. was proud to announce the release and general availability of new versions for its ownCloud Desktop and ownCloud Android clients.
  • LibreOffice 5.1 Released with Boatload of Changes
  • Ubuntu Core Now Supports Intel NUC Mini PC
    Canonical has this week announced that the Ubuntu Core now supports the Intel NUC DE3815TY mini PC after working together with Intel the company has now created a standard platform for developers to test and create x86-based IOT solutions using snappy Ubuntu Core.
  • 6 reasons to blog in Markdown with Jekyll
    GitHub pages is a free offering that can host your Jekyll blog for free. It also takes care of generating static HTML files from your Markdown text files, so there's no need to install anything on your computer. You can also use Jekyll with your own domain name (if you have one).

Education and Open Access

  • UNICEF Seeks World-Changing Open Source Technologies
    United Nations to fund startups to develop open source tech to improve the lives of vulnerable children and civilians
  • UCLA just open-sourced a powerful new image-detection algorithm
    Image recognition has become increasingly critical in applications ranging from smartphones to driverless cars, and on Wednesday UCLA opened up to the public a new algorithm that promises big gains. The Phase Stretch Transform algorithm is a physics-inspired computational approach to processing images and information that can help computers "see" features of objects that aren't visible using standard imaging techniques. It could be used to detect an LED lamp's internal structure, for example -- something that would be obscured to conventional techniques by the brightness of its light. It can also distinguish distant stars that would normally be invisible in astronomical images, UCLA said.
  • Open-source textbooks gain in push for college affordability [Ed: same as below]
  • Open-Source Textbooks Gain in Push for College Affordability
    The standard textbook for Fundamentals of General Chemistry I at the University of Connecticut has a list price of $303. For students who use the version professor Edward Neth is preparing for the fall semester, the cost will be zero. An early adopter of open source textbooks, Neth said he turned to the new technology out of frustration with spiraling prices of commercial textbooks. "It's seeing the costs go up every semester and almost feeling powerless," Neth said.
  • Zika articles made open-source to accelerate research
    Nature, the Lancet and many other medical publishers and researchers have announced that all Zika-related scientific articles will be published freely in the wake of the recent outbreak.