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7 Best Free and Open Source Python Web Frameworks

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OSS

Python is an increasingly popular programming language. It ranks very highly on sites listing the popularity of programming languages, such as the TIOBE Index, IEEE Spectrum ranking, and the PYPL PopularitY of Programming Language.

The prominence of Python is, in part, due to its flexibility, with the language frequently used by web and desktop developers, system administrators, data scientists, and machine learning engineers. It’s easy to learn and powerful to develop any kind of system with the language. Python’s large user base offers a virtuous circle. There’s more support available from the open source community for budding programmers seeking assistance.

One of the types of software that’s important for a web developer is the web framework. A framework “is a code library that makes a developer’s life easier when building reliable, scalable, and maintainable web applications” by providing reusable code or extensions for common operations. By saving development time, developers can concentrate on application logic rather than mundane elements.

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Open source brings musicians together virtually

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OSS

When the COVID-19 pandemic began canceling live music events in spring 2020, it wasn't just the big arena shows, music festivals, and small, local venues that suffered—the big annual marching band competition leagues, like Drum Corps International (DCI) and WGI World Championships, were also called off. This was a huge disappointment for the thousands of musicians and band directors who were already preparing for the spring and summer competition season. But the members of the Drumcorps subreddit saw it as an opportunity to take drum corps virtual.

The Open Source Drum and Bugle Corps (OSDBC) is one such organization bringing open source to drum corps. The group was founded on the principles of openness, inclusiveness, and collaboration. And, like most things in open source, OSDBC was created to solve a problem.

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Free Software Leftovers

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GNU
OSS
  • Call to apply for FSFE support for your local project

    It is no secret that the FSFE's activities are only possible with the priceless help of our contributors and supporters around Europe. In return we support local engagement with our expertise, information material, networks or even financially. To help formalize this process, we run our second call for FSFE community projects.

    From international campaigns to local information booths, our successful spreading of software freedom is based on many shoulders from active members within our community. This is why ever since the FSFE e.V. has been keen on supporting initiatives and activities from local FSFE groups to single supporters. We happily support you with our expertise, our information material, our networks or even financially.

  • DataStax optimizes Cassandra for Kubernetes with K8ssandra

    DataStax is creating a new way for users to get the open source Cassandra database running on the Kubernetes cloud-native platform, with the K8ssandra project released on Nov. 18.

    The release comes during the same week as the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2020 virtual event, which is hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation to highlight the latest innovations across the Kubernetes landscape.

    Kubernetes is a container orchestration platform that has become increasingly popular as it helps to enables multi-cloud deployment for applications. Like many other database vendors, DataStax has been using what is known as a Kubernetes Operator to help users get the Cassandra database running on Kubernetes.

  • How to Give and Receive Technical Help in Open Source Communities

    “As a developer, it’s exciting and challenging to stay up to speed with the latest trends in technology. Every day, new languages, frameworks and devices capture our attention and spur conversations in meetups, forums and chats. However, our developer community is made of people, not tools, and it’s fascinating to explore its sociopolitical aspects. We are always beginners at some things and experts at others. Along the way from beginner to expert, we ask a lot of questions, but it can be intimidating to ask for help.”

    This is how Sonia Singla, Cloud Native Computing Foundation intern and mentee, kicked off her talk at this year’s Kubecon+CloudNativeCon North America. Fresh off her CNCF internship with Thanos and Outreachy placement at Mozilla, Singla took the lessons she’s learned over the last two years in both toxic and welcoming environments to offer advice for both how to give and receive technical help in open source communities.

  • New JOINUP Compatibility Checker Permalink

    The JLA analyses now more than 50 open licenses

    The main innovation of the JLA is the possibility to SELECT open licenses based on their content

    The JLA was also an example of synergy with the SPDX project of the Linux Foundation. The JLA adopted the SPDX license identifier as a standard and is linked with the license full text that is provided from the SPDX data base.

How we develop success metrics for open source events

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OSS

As many open source communities grow larger and older, they may face problems managing members' engagement. People turn towards metrics to understand large systems and prioritize resources, but there has not been a consensus set of metrics for understanding open source communities.

The Community Health Analytics Open Source Software (CHAOSS) project, a Linux Foundation-sponsored community of industry professionals and academics, is working to solve this problem by defining metrics for open source projects. The CHAOSS project focused first on developing metrics for open source event organizers because open source communities often depend on events like hackathons, meetups, conferences, and user group meetings to grow their communities and work on important project updates.

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What do open source product teams do?

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OSS

If you go to any hip product management conference, you'll hear about product teams. At a minimum, a product team has a product manager, but it often includes roles in marketing, technical architecture, and even user experience (UX). Previous articles in this series have covered open source as a supply chain model and defining products in the open source software supply chain, and this article specifically focuses on the role of product management within the product team.

Product managers and product marketing managers are the two most common product management roles, but product management can be further split into any number of roles, including competitive analysis, business strategy, sales enablement, revenue growth, content creation, sales tools, and more. With a very large product, even the product management role may be broken up into separate roles. You may even hear titles like technical marketing manager, product evangelist, and business owner, not to mention people-management roles for groups of individual contributor roles. For the purpose of this article, I refer to all of these roles collectively as "product management."

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10 Best Free and Open Source Python Data Analysis

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OSS

Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Programmers and data scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language.

Data analysis is a process of inspecting, cleansing, transforming and modelling data with the goal of discovering useful information, informing conclusions and supporting decision-making.

Here’s our recommendations for performing data analysis using Python. All of the software is free and open source goodness.

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Linux and open source: The biggest issue in 2020

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Linux
OSS

For the most part, 2020 was actually pretty good for open source. Enterprise-level companies embraced open source software even further, containers and the cloud became even more crucial to both businesses and consumers, the Linux community found a larger piece of the support pie from large manufacturers like Microsoft, and distributions continued to wow.

That doesn't mean the year was full of celebrations, as there were some rather cringe-worthy moments. A good number of major open source projects suffered from poorly written or out of date documentation, DockerHub started throttling image downloads, etc.

There was, however, one particular issue open source faced in 2020 that will not only go down as a thorn in the side of the community for the year, but will probably haunt us moving forward.

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Stars and Stripes: NASA and Linux

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Linux
OSS

This is the first in a series spotlighting large institutions in the USA and how they are embracing Linux and open source.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and space research. NASA’s budget in 2020 is over $22 billion. To put that figure into context, that’s equivalent to the annual GDP of Zambia, Papua New Guinea, or Laos.

How is NASA embracing Linux and open source?

NASA runs a set of supercomputers with the names Pleiades, Electra, Aitken, Merope, and Endeavour at the Ames Research Center. Pleides is one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers, currently ranked the 39th most powerful in the world, sporting an eye-watering 241,108 cores and 211,968 GB of memory. Pleiades and the other supercomputers run on a custom version of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

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Why Companies Can Benefit From Open Source

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GNU
OSS

All (pure) open source licenses allow the commercial use of that software. Hence, anybody can take the open source software, rebrand it and then sell it online or offline.

Companies can use this approach for their own benefit; They can take a software like LibreOffice, modify it and change its name to make it better, and then sell it along with their support in their own local communities. Collabora Office – for example – is a fork of LibreOffice, and Collabora just add their modifications to LibreOffice and then sell it under a different name.

Localization efforts can go even further in this; Some companies in Brazil, for example, offer to perform the digital transfer of traditional companies from proprietary software to open source software, and hence they can earn money by providing logistics and support services to the users of these open source software.

All of this without having to get the consent of the original developers or any written permission from them, since open source licenses already allow such use cases in their definitions.

This type of usage is extremely popular in ERP software; One open source ERP software becomes so popular, then another takes its source code, rebrand it & modify it and then publish it under a different name in their own local community (E.g India).

Still, one point to take in mind is that it is very highly unethical to take without giving back. If you find an open source software very useful to you or your business, then you should give something back to the original developers of that software who gave it for you for free.

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LazPaint: A Free & Open Source Paint.NET Alternative

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OSS

If you are fond of using tools to quickly edit and manipulate images and screenshots, you may have heard about Paint.NET, which is available only for Windows systems.

It is a popular nifty tool to get a lot of basic editing tasks done along with a bunch of options available. You might be aware of several image editing tools but Paint.NET is a pretty popular option just because it is easy to use without any bloated feature for an average user.

LazPaint comes to the rescue as an impressive open source replacement to Paint.NET for Linux, Windows, and macOS. It offers most of the essential features one would need to manipulate images while being easy to use.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Using Linux At University: Easier Than You Think - YouTube

    Since I'm done with uni now I thought I'd be fun to offer some advice on getting through university or college daily driving Linux, for the most part it'll be fine but there are some points where you'll run into some trouble in a software engineering context.

  • Linus is about to REJECT YOUR PRIVILEGES!
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  • A chat with Trese Brothers Games about the upcoming cyberpunk Cyber Knights: Flashpoint | GamingOnLinux

    We have a chat with Trese Brothers Games who are currently developing Cyber Knights: Flashpoint following a successful Kickstarter campaign earlier in March 2020.

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  • Big adventures ahead - Little Big Adventures

    Once upon a time in the past - around the year 1994 - a software company called Adeline Software International released a game titled “Little Big Adventure” or “Relentless: Twinsen's Adventure”. This game, a classic pseudo-3D action adventure game with an epic story set on a fantastic planet, has now entered the testing stage in ScummVM. Please, note that a few features of the original game are not implemented yet. However, we also added a few features which are new for the game.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (cimg, golang-1.7, golang-1.8, krb5, mediawiki, mupdf, php-pear, samba, thunderbird, and zabbix), Fedora (chromium, krb5, microcode_ctl, pngcheck, and rpki-client), Mageia (librepo, postgresql, python-twisted, raptor2, tcpdump, and thunderbird), openSUSE (blueman, java-11-openjdk, moinmoin-wiki, python, rmt-server, SDL, and tcpdump), Red Hat (chromium-browser and thunderbird), SUSE (c-ares, ceph, dash, firefox, java-1_8_0-openjdk, postgresql10, postgresql12, postgresql96, u-boot, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (openldap).

Programming Leftovers

  • 6 predictions for JavaScript build tools | Opensource.com

    Code used in production is different from development code. In production, you need to build packages that run fast, manage dependencies, automate tasks, load external modules, and more. JavaScript tools that make it possible to turn development code into production code are called build tools.

  • The mysterious case of the SVt_PVIV | The Incredible Journey

    The other day I wanted to send my friend some silly emojis on LINE and so I updated my flaky old Unicode browser to the new-fangled Unicode with values above 0x10000, so that I could fetch the Emojis, which start around here. The thing also features a perl script which fetches values from Unicode::UCD using the charinfo function. I also updated to Perl 5.32 around the same time. Now the funny thing was that I started getting all kinds of errors about invalid JSON in the browser console. My Perl script was sending something of the form {... "script":Common ...} from my module JSON::Create, which is not valid JSON due to not having quotes around Common, and obviously my module was faulty.

  • JSON::Create now features indentation | The Incredible Journey

    In version 0.27 of JSON::Create I added a new indentation feature. This was added basically out of necessity. Originally the purpose of the module was sending short bits of JSON over the internet, but I've been using JSON more and more for processing data too. I've spent quite a long time working on a web site for recognition of Chinese, and I've been using JSON more and more extensively. The basic data file for the web site is a 168 megabyte JSON file. Not indenting this kind of file makes for "interesting" problems if one accidentally opens it in an editor or on a terminal screen, a million characters all on one line tends to confuse the best-written text reading utilities. So after years of suffering the relief is tremendous, and now I have tab-based indentation in JSON::Create.

  • Python Convert String to Int - Python Examples – TecAdmin

    Its a common uses of type conversion in any programming language. Python also provides inbuilt methods for type conversion. This tutorial will help to convert a string value to integer value with Python.

Richard Hughes: fwupd 1.5.2

If you’re running 1.5.0 or 1.5.1 you probably want to update to this release now as it fixes a hard-to-debug hang we introduced in 1.5.0. If you’re running 1.4.x you might want to let the libcurl changes settle, although we’ve been using it without issue for more than a week on a ton of hardware here. Expect 1.5.3 in a few weeks time, assuming we’re all still alive by then. Read more

Xfce Virtual Machine Images For Development

The openSUSE distributions offer a variety of graphical desktop environments, one of them being the popular and lightweight Xfce. Up to now there was the stable tested branch available in Tumbleweed already during install. Furthermore, for interested users the development OBS repository xfce:next offered a preview state of what’s coming up next to Tumbleweed. Xfce Development in openSUSE Thanks to the hard work of openSUSE’s Xfce team there is a third option: Xfce Development Repository aka RAT In a playful way, a rat is meant to represent the unpolished nature of this release: a rat is scruffy looking compared to a mouse (the cute and beloved mascot of Xfce). And the RAT repository provides packages automatically built right from the Git Master Branch of Xfce upstream development. The goal of this project is to test and preview the new software so that bugs can be spotted and fixed ahead of time by contributing upstream. The packages pull in source code state on a daily basis and offer a quite convenient way to test and eventually help development. So this is where the team builds and tests the latest and unstable releases of Xfce Desktop Environment for openSUSE. Read more