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PhysX Liberated

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Graphics/Benchmarks
OSS
  • NVIDIA Extends PhysX for High Fidelity Simulations, Goes Open Source

    NVIDIA PhysX, the most popular physics simulation engine on the planet, is going open source.

    We’re doing this because physics simulation — long key to immersive games and entertainment — turns out to be more important than we ever thought.

    Physics simulation dovetails with AI, robotics and computer vision, self-driving vehicles, and high-performance computing.

  • NVIDIA have now made PhysX open source

    Popping up a little while ago on Twitter, NVIDIA has announced that they've now put PhysX under an open source license.

    Something I am sure many game developers and the open source community will approve of. Writing about it on their official blog, NVIDIA said "We’re doing this because physics simulation — long key to immersive games and entertainment — turns out to be more important than we ever thought.".

  • NVIDIA Makes PhysX Open-Source

    As a very big surprise bundled alongside the announcement today of the $2,499 USD TITAN RTX graphics card is word that NVIDIA's PhysX software is going open-source!

    It was a decade ago that NVIDIA acquired PhysX from their acquisition of AGEIA Technologies who at the time was working on Physics Processing Units. Since then, PhysX has become tightly coupled with NVIDIA GPUs and CUDA, but now the company is deciding to open-source it.

NVIDIA Open-Sourcing PhysX

NVIDIA PhysX Engine Now is Open-Source

  • NVIDIA PhysX Engine Now is Open-Source

    NVIDIA PhysX is going open source. NVIDIA is doing this because physics simulation - long key to immersive games and entertainment - turns out to be more important than we ever thought. Physics simulation dovetails with AI, robotics and computer vision, self-driving vehicles, and high-performance computing.

    It’s foundational for so many different things we’ve decided to provide it to the world in an open source fashion. Meanwhile, we’re building on more than a decade of continuous investment in this area to simulate the world with ever greater fidelity, with on-going research and development to meet the needs of those working in robotics and with autonomous vehicles. PhysX will now be the only free, open-source physics solution that takes advantage of GPU acceleration and can handle large virtual environments.

Nvidia moves PhysX engine to an open-source license

  • Nvidia moves PhysX engine to an open-source license

    What just happened? Starting today, Nvidia has chosen to offer the PhysX engine under an open-source license. It believes that fields other than video games, such as AI and robotics, can benefit from its use. Version 4.0, which releases later this month includes improvements geared for industrial-grade simulations.

    If you play video games at all, even occasionally, you are probably familiar with or have at least seen the logo for Nvidia’s PhysX engine. The software is used in a multitude of titles from Call of Duty to The Witcher to realistically simulate objects that react naturally to forces in a 3D-rendered environment.

Week later

  • NVIDIA Extends PhysX for High-Fidelity Simulations, Goes Open Source

    NVIDIA PhysX, the most popular physics simulation engine on the planet, is going open source.

    We’re doing this because physics simulation — long key to immersive games and entertainment — turns out to be more important than we ever thought.

    Physics simulation dovetails with AI, robotics and computer vision, self-driving vehicles, and high performance computing.

    It’s foundational for so many different things that we’ve decided to provide it to the world in an open source fashion.

Still in the news a fortnight later

  • Nvidia Open Sources Physics Engine

    Nvidia has released a new version of its physics engine, PhysX, and has made it open source. The developers say the engine has been upgraded to provide industrial grade simulation quality at game simulation performance.

    PhysX was already available for use for free, even in commercial projects, but the fact it is now open source means developers can modify the engine if they want to without paying a license fee.

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