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$100 netbook has ten-inch screen

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Linux
Hardware

Shenzen-based Science and Technology Co. Ltd. has released a $100 netbook that runs Android, Linux, or Windows CE 6.0 on a Via-manufactured ARM SoC (system on chip). The 1.87-pound device includes a 10-inch screen with 1024 x 600 pixel resolution, from 1GB to 4GB of flash storage, and two hours of battery life, according to the Shanzhaiben.com website.

The report by Shanzhaiben.com did not provide a model number or name for the new Science and Technology product, though several blogs have subsequently referred to it as the Wabook. By whatever name, the device is one of many ultra-cheap netbooks with ARM9 or MIPS CPUs that have come out of Shenzen.

Apart from their relatively low-powered CPUs, these budget devices have all kept costs down by employing 7-inch screens with a resolution of just 800 x 600 pixels, as far as we're aware. The new Science and Technology offering features a 10-inch screen with claimed 1024 x 600 resolution, bringing it into line with the majority of more expensive, Intel Atom-based netbooks. As pictured below, the device appears less toy-like than other $100 netbooks.

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