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Free Software Foundation's Richard Stallman Says Don't Call It 'Open Source'

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OSS

GNU guru Richard Stallman sent me an e-mail the other day complaining that we erred by saying that the Free Software Foundation, of which he's president, promotes open source software. "We have never supported the idea of 'open source' because that idea denies the importance of users' freedom," he writes. Read on for the dizzying semantics behind Richard's argument, and why I think his obsessive attempts at language control are shooting his own software objectives in the foot.

Believe me when I tell you I'm sympathetic to a big part of Stallman's case. I get that he's hung up on how Linux has stolen all the thunder from GNU, and that he must be ticked Linus Torvalds is the face of open source software when he was the guy beating the drums first, and most loudly.

At the same time, it's clear that his inflexibility is wearing. It's hard to swallow that he seems to beat up people who are honestly trying to cover open source -- excuse me, free software -- worse than those who ignore the stuff entirely.

REst Here




Stallman

You'd think I'd stop being surprised by now, but Stallman once again redefines the term "Idiot".

I'm too indifferent(or lazy) to look, but doesn't the FSF have a board of directors? Assuming they too are not a bunch of drooling baboons, why do they put up with the never ending PR nightmare that Stallman goes out of his way to provoke.

Stallman = fail

Stallman really fails. He once again confuses software with religion. I don't thing the FSF is doing itself a favor with such an idiot as its figurehead.

Let us all sing the OpenBSD release-song 'Home to Hypocrisy' again:
http://www.openbsd.org/43.html

corrected link

http://www.openbsd.org/lyrics.html#43

Source

Do you have a source for that? I must admit that I have never seen this statement.

There will be no source forthcoming.

Grandparent (atang1) is almost certainly a troll. Literally every sentence in the post is a lie.

There is no problem using GCC on closed source code - id software, Aspyr and IBM are among many companies that do so.

Is this really hard for people??

Let's try this:

Open Source is a development model only, one that Microsoft also uses, that shares access to the source code.

Free Software gives users rights (Freedoms -- see the connection?) to that software and source code.

Software may fall into both categories, but it never only falls into the Free Software side, because that necessitates open access to the source code.

Neither are by definition anti-Microsoft, but supporters of both do take a lot of issue with Microsoft's business and license practices.

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