Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Grisoft predicts Linux virus plague

Filed under
Security

Grisoft, makers of the popular AVG Anti-Virus offering, has warned that it is "only a matter of time" before Linux becomes widely targeted by virus and malware writers.

Michael Foreman, a partner at AVG UK, said: "In the past few years we have seen the use of enterprise Linux applications growing steadily, and it is only a matter of time before we can expect to see virus attacks specifically targeted at these users.

"Grisoft is one of the first mainstream antivirus vendors to have started a whole new division dedicated to Linux protection."

Full Story.

Gosh

I guess it's lucky for all of us that, yes by golly, Grisoft just happens to sell a Linux Anti-Virus. Grisoft should fire whatever PR flunky that thought FUD would work in the Linux market. What ever happened to intelligent marketing - or is that now a relegated to the oxymoron category?

I know

I almost put "ad disguised as news" instead "Full story!" Big Grin

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Elevates TinkerPop Graph Computing Framework to Top Level
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Now, the foundation has announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. "Graph databases and mainstream interest in graph applications have seen tremendous growth in recent years," said Stephen Mallette, Vice President of Apache TinkerPop. "Since its inception in 2009, TinkerPop has been helping to promote that growth with its Open Source graph technology stack. We are excited to now do this same work as a top-level project within the Apache Software Foundation."
  • Why a Buffer developer open sourced his code
    If you look for the official definition of open source, you'll likely stumble upon this outline from the board members of the Open Source Initiative. If you skim through it, you're sure to find some idea or concept that you feel very aligned with. At its heart, openness (and open source) is about free distribution—putting your work out there for others to use. It's really about helping others and giving back. ​When we started to think about open source and how we could implement it at Buffer, the fit seemed not only natural, but crucial to how we operate. In fact, it seemed that in a lot of ways we'd be doing ourselves a disservice if we didn't start to look more seriously at it. But what I didn't quite realize at the time were all the effects that open source would have on me.
  • How to make a culture change at your company
    I attended an interesting talk by Barry O'Reilly at the Cultivate pre-conference at OSCON 2016 about "how to push through change in an enterprise." Though I think the title should have been: "What the enterprise can learn from open source."
  • Two OSCON Conversations, And A Trip Report Between Them
    My last visit to OSCON was in 2011, when I had worked for the Wikimedia Foundation for under a year, and wanted to build and strengthen relationships with the MediaWiki and PHP communities. I remember not feeling very successful, and thinking that this was a conference where executives and engineers (who in many cases are not terribly emotionally passionate about open source) meet to hire, get hired, and sell each other things.
  • Struggling to open a document or photo? Here’s how to do it
    Things are a bit trickier if you have a file from a productivity application you don’t have access to —such as a Word document and no Word application, either to open it or re-save it. The solution is still simple, though — download Libre Office. Libre Office is a free and fully functional office suite that’s more than a match for Microsoft Office, and it can open (and save in) Office file formats.
  • OpenBSD/loongson on the Lemote Yeeloong 8101B
    After hunting for Loongson based hardware for the first half of 2015, I was finally able to find an used Yeeloong in July, in very good condition. Upon receiving the parcel, the first thing I did was to install OpenBSD on this exquisitely exotic machine.
  • Call for GIMP 2.10 Documentation Update
    With the upcoming GIMP 2.10 release we intend to finally close the time gap between releases of source code, installers, and the user manual. This means that we need a more coordinated effort between the GIMP developers team and the GIMP User Manual team. For the past several months we’ve already been working on GIMP mostly in bugfix mode. It’s time to start updating the user manual to match all the changes in GIMP 2.10, and we would appreciate your help with that.
  • Mobile Age project: making senior citizens benefit from open government data
    On 1 February 2016, ten European partners launched the Mobile Age project. Aiming to develop inclusive mobile access to public services using open government data, Mobile Age targets a group of citizens that are usually marginalised when it comes to technical innovations but which is rapidly growing in number and expectations: European senior citizens. While more and more public services are made available online only, older persons’ needs and wishes towards digital services are rarely understood and taken in account. This deficit is often exacerbated by their lower digital skills and poor access to the internet. In order to cope with this, Mobile Age is based on the concept of co-creation: it will develop mobile open government services that are created together with senior citizens.
  • Protecting IP in a 3D printed future
    3D printing might just change everything. At least John Hornick, who leads Finnegan’s 3D printing working group and wrote 3D Printing Will Rock the World, certainly thinks so. Introduced by Bracewell Giuliani’s Erin Hennessy, Hornick spoke to INTA registrants yesterday morning about the dramatic consequences he believes the proliferation of 3D printing could have for intellectual property.

Big Data/OpenStack

Networking/SDN

Development News

  • Google GSoC, Outreachy Kick Off Their Summer 2016 Coding Projects
    Yesterday marked the official start of the projects for this year's Google Summer of Code and the summer round of the Outreachy (formerly the Outreach Program for Women) projects. The Google Open-Source Blog announced the start of GSoC 2016 with this being their 12th year and having around 1,200 students with 178 different open-source organizations participating.
  • Japan Just Made Computer Programming A Compulsory Subject In Its Schools
    With an aim to improve children’s creative and logical thinking, Japan has decided to make programming a compulsory subject in its schools. To start this program from 2020, the Japanese government has constituted panels to decide the programming syllabus and incorporated the matter in its growth strategy agenda.
  • GitLab Container Registry
    Yesterday we released GitLab 8.8, super powering GitLab's built-in continuous integration. With it, you can build a pipeline in GitLab, visualizing your builds, tests, deploys and any other stage of the life cycle of your software. Today (and already in GitLab 8.8), we're releasing the next step: GitLab Container Registry. GitLab Container Registry is a secure and private registry for Docker images. Built on open source software, GitLab Container Registry isn't just a standalone registry; it's completely integrated with GitLab.
  • Moving on From GitHub
    Last year I joined GitHub as Director Of Community. My role has been to champion and manage GitHub’s global, scalable community development initiatives. Friday was my last day as a hubber and I wanted to share a few words about why I have decided to move on. My passion has always been about building productive, engaging communities, particularly focused on open source and technology. I have devoted my career to understanding the nuances of this work and which workflow, technical, psychological, and leadership ingredients can deliver the most effective and rewarding results. As part of this body of work I wrote The Art of Community, founded the annual Community Leadership Summit, and I have led the development of community at Canonical, XPRIZE, OpenAdvantage, and for a range of organizations as a consultant and advisor.
  • My time with Rails is up
    Last year I made a decision that I won’t be using Rails anymore, nor I will support Rails in gems that I maintain. Furthermore, I will do my best to never have to work with Rails again at work. Since I’m involved with many Ruby projects and people have been asking me many times why I don’t like Rails, what kind of problems I have with it and so on, I decided to write this long post to summarize and explain everything. This is semi-technical, semi-personal and unfortunately semi-rant. I’m not writing this to bring attention, get visitors or whatever, I have no interest in that at all. I’m writing this because I want to end my discussions about Rails and have a place to refer people to whenever I hear the same kind of questions.
  • An overview of Lean, Agile and DevOps
    The lunch of big corporate IT is being stolen by smaller, nimbler companies. Big IT, with its greater resources, should have crushed the competition. Rather it is playing catch-up. But things are changing. There is a quiet revolution in corporate IT. Big organisations are learning from small companies and are beginning to use it at scale. Goliath is back but acting like David.