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Your Computer's Clipboard is a Security Problem - Fix it in Linux With xsel and cron

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HowTos

Any program you run can read your clipboard, and its contents linger until another copy event or a reboot. Modern browsers enable multiple ways for malicious websites to read the clipboard contents (or add items in), so eliminate the worry by using a script with cron that auto-clears your clipboard regularly.

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via DMT/Linux Blog

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • After MongoDB Debacle, Expect More Ransomware, Open Source Attacks in 2017 [Ed: Black Duck is at it again]

    "Black Duck's Open Source Security Audit Report found that, on average, vulnerabilities in open source components used in commercial application were over 5 years old," Pittenger said. "The Linux kernel vulnerability discovered 8/16 (CVE-2016-5195) had been in the Linux code base since 2012. Most organizations don't know about the open source vulnerabilities in their code because they don't track the open source components they use, and don't actively monitor open source vulnerability information."

  • Mirai: Student behind IoT malware used it in Minecraft server protection racket, claims Krebs

    SECURITY BLOGGER BRIAN KREBS has suggested that "Anna Senpai", the reprobate behind the Mirai Internet-of-shonky-Things (IoT) botnet, is a student studying at Rutgers University in the US.

    Krebs made his disclosure after conducting an in-depth investigation and finding out that Mirai had been developed and deployed over the past three years or so - it didn't suddenly emerge last year.

    Krebs believes that Mirai has been used a number of times in connection with what looks suspiciously likes an online protection racket: companies running, for example, Minecraft servers being offered distributed denial of service (DDoS) protection, on the one hand, just before being taken offline in massive DDoS attacks on the other.

  • Gmail phishing scam has everyone reaching for 2FA

    STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING, unless you don't have a Gmail account. Carry on if that is the case.

    If you do use Gmail you apparently really, really, need to be aware of a crafty phishing scam that will have you hooked, lined, sinkered, gutted, covered in batter and served with curry sauce before you have a chance to realise that anything is happening.

    The scam that has everyone in a lather uses a deceptive URL, and quite a sneaky one. People probably won't even notice it because, for the most part, it looks fine. It is only once it is clicked and the bastard gateway is broken through that the phishing and the stealing begins.

Canonical Patches Nvidia Graphics Drivers Vulnerability in All Ubuntu Releases

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Security

It's time to update your Ubuntu Linux operating system if you have a Nvidia graphics card running the Nvidia Legacy 340 or 304 binary X.Org drivers provided on the official software repositories.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Security News

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Security
  • Reproducible Builds: week 90 in Stretch cycle

    The F-Droid Verification Server has been launched. It rebuilds apps from source that were built by f-droid.org and checks that the results match.

  • 6 Week Progress Update for PGP Clean Room

    One of the PGP Clean Room’s aims is to provide users with the option to easily initialize one or more smartcards with personal info and pins, and subsequently transfer keys to the smartcard(s). The advantage of using smartcards is that users don’t have to expose their keys to their laptop for daily certification, signing, encryption or authentication purposes.

  • New Kali Linux Professional Information Security Certification to debut at Black Hat USA, 2017

    First Official Kali Linux book release will coincide with launch of the new information security training program as the Penetration Testing platform celebrates its 10th anniversary.

  • The flatpak security model – part 1: The basics

    This is the first part of a series talking about the approach flatpak takes to security and sandboxing.

    First of all, a lot of people think of container technology like docker, rkt or systemd-nspawn when they think of linux sandboxing. However, flatpak is fundamentally different to these in that it is unprivileged.

  • Newly discovered Mac malware found in the wild also works well on Linux [Ed: Only if fools are stupid enough to actually INSTALL malware.]

    The malware, which a recent Mac OS update released by Apple is detecting as Fruitfly, contains code that captures screenshots and webcam images, collects information about each device connected to the same network as the infected Mac, and can then connect to those devices, according to a blog post published by anti-malware provider Malwarebytes. It was discovered only this month, despite being painfully easy to detect and despite indications that it may have been circulating since the release of the Yosemite release of OS X in October 2014. It's still unclear how machines get infected.

    [...]

    Another intriguing finding: with the exception of Mac-formatted Mach object file binary, the entire Fruitfly malware library runs just fine on Linux computers.

Why Linux Installers Need to Add Security Features

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Linux
Security

Twelve years ago, Linux distributions were struggling to make installation simple. Led by Ubuntu and Fedora, they long ago achieved that goal. Now, with the growing concerns over security, they need to reverse directions slightly, and make basic security options prominently available in their installers rather than options that users can add manually later.

At the best of times, of course, convincing users to come anywhere near security features is difficult. Too many users are reluctant even to add features as simple as unprivileged user accounts or passwords, apparently preferring the convenience of the moment to reducing the risk of an intrusion that will require reinstallation, or a consultation with a computer expert at eighty dollars an hour.

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Security News

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Security
  • Wednesday's security updates
  • Secure your Elasticsearch cluster and avoid ransomware

    Last week, news came out that unprotected MongoDB databases are being actively compromised: content copied and replaced by a message asking for a ransom to get it back. As The Register reports: Elasticsearch is next.

    Protecting access to Elasticsearch by a firewall is not always possible. But even in environments where it is possible, many admins are not protecting their databases. Even if you cannot use a firewall, you can secure connection to Elasticsearch by using encryption. Elasticsearch by itself does not provide any authentication or encryption possibilities. Still, there are many third-party solutions available, each with its own drawbacks and advantages.

  • Resolve to Follow These 8 Steps for Better Data Security in 2017

    Getting physically fit is a typical New Year's resolution. Given that most of us spend more time online than in a gym, the start of the new year also might be a great time to improve your security “fitness.” As with physical fitness challenges, the biggest issue with digital security is always stagnation. That is, if you don't move and don't change, atrophy sets in. In physical fitness, atrophy is a function of muscles not being exercised. In digital fitness, security risks increase when you fail to change passwords, update network systems and adopt improved security technology. Before long, your IT systems literally become a “sitting duck.” Given the volume of data breaches that occurred in 2016, it is highly likely that everyone reading this has had at least one breach of their accounts compromised in some way, such as their Yahoo data account. Hackers somewhere may have one of the passwords you’ve used at one point to access a particular site or service. If you're still using that same password somewhere, in a way that can connect that account to you, that's a non-trivial risk. Changing passwords is the first of eight security resolutions that can help to improve your online security fitness in 2017. Click through this eWEEK slide show to discover the rest.

  • Pwn2Own 2017 Takes Aim at Linux, Servers and Web Browsers

    10th anniversary edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest offers over $1M in prize money to security researchers across a long list of targets including Virtual Machines, servers, enterprise applications and web browsers.

    Over the last decade, the Zero Day Initiative's (ZDI) annual Pwn2Own competition has emerged to become one of the premiere events on the information security calendar and the 2017 edition does not look to be any different. For the tenth anniversary of the Pwn2Own contest, ZDI, now owned and operated by Trend Micro, is going farther than ever before, with more targets and more prize money available for security researchers to claim by successfully executing zero-day exploits.

  • 'Factorio' is another game that was being hit by key scammers

    In another case of scammers trying to buy keys with often stolen credit cards to sell on websites like G2A, the developers of 'Factorio' have written about their experience with it (and other stuff too).

Security News

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Security

  • Security advisories for Tuesday
  • FOI: NHS Trusts are ransomware pin cushions [Ed: Windows]

    The FOI requests found that 87 per cent of attacks came via a networked NHS device and that 80 per cent were down to phished staffers. However, only a small proportion of the 100 or so Trusts responded to this part of the requests.

    "These results are far from surprising. Public sector organisations make a soft target for fraudsters because budget and resource shortages frequently leave hospitals short-changed when it comes to security basics like regular software patching," said Tony Rowan, Chief Security Consultant at SentinelOne.

    "The results highlight the fact that old school AV technology is powerless to halt virulent, mutating forms of malware like ransomware and a new more dynamic approach to endpoint protection is needed.

Canonical to Remove Old Unity 7 Scopes from Ubuntu Because They're Not Secure

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Security

Canonical's Will Cooke has revealed recently the company's plans on removing some old, unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes from the Ubuntu Linux archives because they could threaten the security of the entire operating system.

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