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Looks Like Ubuntu 22.10 Will Finally Switch to PipeWire by Default and Drop PulseAudio

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Linux
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Ubuntu

If you were wondering when Ubuntu will finally switch to PipeWire as default for audio, it looks like your wish might come true with the next release of Ubuntu Linux, the Kinetic Kudu, due out later this year on October 20th.

Canonical employee and Ubuntu Desktop developer Heather Ellsworth was the one to reveal the other day on a thread on the Ubuntu Discourse channel the fact that the Ubuntu devs are planning to run only PipeWire and not PulseAudio as the default sound server for the Ubuntu 22.10 release.

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Ubuntu 22.10 Makes PipeWire Default

  • Ubuntu 22.10 Makes PipeWire Default

    PipeWire is the default audio server in Ubuntu 22.10.

    The latest daily builds of the development release (which is codenamed ‘Kinetic Kudu’) ship with Pipewire in place of Pulseaudio out of the box, no workarounds required. The last time Ubuntu made made a major change to its audio stack was (fittingly) in the last ‘K’-named release, Ubuntu 9.10 ‘Karmic Koala’.

    Ubuntu trails its distro rivals in adopting this next-gen sound server tech. The roots of PipeWire go back to 2015. The tech was initially conceived as a “PulseAudio for video”, but was later expanded to include audio streams. Fedora adopted the tech by default in 2021, and other desktop Linux distro’s soon followed suit.

    Technically speaking Ubuntu already includes PipeWire. Ubuntu 22.04 LTS ships with both PipeWire and PulseAudio installed on the default image. However, the former stack is only used for video (mainly for Wayland compatability) and the latter remains in charge of audio duties.

Ubuntu 22.10 is dropping PulseAudio - gHacks Tech News

  • Ubuntu 22.10 is dropping PulseAudio - gHacks Tech News

    The news was confirmed officially by Canonical Employee and Ubuntu Desktop Developer, Heather Ellsworth, on the Ubuntu Discourse thread about the topic,

    “That’s right, as of today the Kinetic iso (pending, not yet current since the changes were just made) has been updated to run only pipewire and not pulseaudio. So @copong, you can look forward to this for kinetic.

Ubuntu 22.10 is dropping PulseAudio - gHacks Tech News

  • Ubuntu 22.10 is dropping PulseAudio - gHacks Tech News

    The news was confirmed officially by Canonical Employee and Ubuntu Desktop Developer, Heather Ellsworth, on the Ubuntu Discourse thread about the topic,

    “That’s right, as of today the Kinetic iso (pending, not yet current since the changes were just made) has been updated to run only pipewire and not pulseaudio. So @copong, you can look forward to this for kinetic.

Another rip-off

Yet another rip-off of my article... it's sad to see sites like gHacks doing this and not even mentioning their source of inspiration for their articles. I know what I wrote in mine so I can immediately see the resemblance in a couple of paragraphs in his so-called "article"... because the rest are quotes.

gHacks

I used to think they were a decent site.

I first saw this news in Larabel's site, linking to Discourse.

New audio server Pipewire coming to next version of Ubuntu

  • New audio server Pipewire coming to next version of Ubuntu

    PipeWire also handles video streams so it does a little more than the outgoing PulseAudio, which as its name suggests only handles audio. To explain what this change means, let's clarify what an audio server is and does.

    The sound playback software system in Linux is a stack, and like the network stack, it has multiple layers that do different things. At the bottom are sound drivers, which are intimately connected with the Linux kernel. Above them sits a sound server, and above that, your apps playing sounds.

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