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Kria KR260 Based on GNU/Linux (Ubuntu)

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  • Kria KR260 – a scalable robotics platform powered with Ubuntu

    The first point to highlight of the Kria KR260 is its seamless path to production deployment with the existing Kria K260 adaptive SOMs. By accelerating the design cycle compared to chip-down design, the Kria SOM portfolio, when combined with Ubuntu offers up to nine-month savings in time to deployment. For robotics companies, this becomes a quick and easy start for all developers with no FPGA expertise required.

  • AMD launches Kria KR260 robotics starter kit

    Today, AMD announced the Kria KR260 Robotics Starter Kit, the latest addition to the Kria portfolio of adaptive system-on-modules (SOMs) and developer kits. A scalable and out-of-the-box development platform for robotics, the Kria KR260 offers a seamless path to production deployment with the existing Kria K26 adaptive SOMs. With native ROS 2 support, the standard framework for robotics application development, and pre-built interfaces for robotics and industrial solutions, the SOM starter kit enables rapid development of hardware-accelerated applications for robotics, machine vision and industrial communication and control.

    [...]

    The KR260 also includes support for the widely-adopted Ubuntu embedded operating system, providing compatibility with the latest long-term support (LTS) versions of Ubuntu Linux Desktop (22.04) from Canonical and ROS 2 Humble Hawksbill.

$349 AMD Kria KR260 Robotics Starter Kit

  • $349 AMD Kria KR260 Robotics Starter Kit takes on NVIDIA Jetson AGX Xavier devkit - CNX Software

    AMD Xilinx Kria KR260 Robotics Starter Kit features the Kria K26 Zynq UltraScale+ XCK26 FPGA MPSoC system-on-module (SoM) introduced last year together with the Kria KV260 Vision AI Starter Kit.

    Designed as a development platform for robotics and industrial applications, the KR260 is said to deliver nearly 5x productivity gain, up to 8x better performance per watt and 3.5x lower latency compared to Nvidia Jetson AGX Xavier or Jetson Nano kits. We’ll have a better look at the details below.

AMD Robotics Starter Kit based on Zynq Ultrascale+ XCK26 SoM

  • AMD Robotics Starter Kit based on Zynq Ultrascale+ XCK26 SoM

    AMD launched the Kria KR260 Robotics Starter Kit which is built around the Kria K26 Zynq UltraScale+ XCK26 System-on-Module (SoM) that entered the market last year. The KR260 has similar specs as the Kria KV260, however, the former is optimized for industrial applications instead of vision AI applications.

    In addition to the Kria K26 SoM, the robotic platform provides 512 Mbit QSPI for primary boot and a microSD slot for a second stage bootloader. The connectivity interface consists of four Gigabit ethernet ports and four USB 3.0.

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