Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

NVIDIA Releases Open-Source GPU Kernel Modules

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

  • NVIDIA Releases Open-Source GPU Kernel Modules

    NVIDIA is now publishing Linux GPU kernel modules as open source with dual GPL/MIT license, starting with the R515 driver release. You can find the source code for these kernel modules in the NVIDIA Open GPU Kernel Modules repo on GitHub.

    This release is a significant step toward improving the experience of using NVIDIA GPUs in Linux, for tighter integration with the OS and for developers to debug, integrate, and contribute back. For Linux distribution providers, the open-source modules increase ease of use. They also improve the out-of-the-box user experience to sign and distribute the NVIDIA GPU driver. Canonical and SUSE are able to immediately package the open kernel modules with Ubuntu and SUSE Linux Enterprise Distributions.

    Developers can trace into code paths and see how kernel event scheduling is interacting with their workload for faster root cause debugging. In addition, enterprise software developers can now integrate the driver seamlessly into the customized Linux kernel configured for their project.

  • Christian Schaller: Why is the open source driver release from NVidia so important for Linux?

    Today NVidia announced that they are releasing an open source kernel driver for their GPUs, so I want to share with you some background information and how this will impact Linux graphics and compute going forward.

    One thing many people are not aware of is that Red Hat is the only Linux OS company who has a strong presence in the Linux compute and graphics engineering space. There are of course a lot of other people working in the space too, like engineers working for Intel, AMD and NVidia or people working for consultancy companies like Collabora or individual community members, but Red Hat as an OS integration company has been very active on trying to ensure we have a maintainable and shared upstream open source stack. This engineering presence is also what has allowed us to move important technologies forward, like getting hiDPI support for Linux some years ago, or working with NVidia to get glvnd implemented to remove a pain point for our users when it came to the NVidia driver and Mesa fighting over the OpenGL driver .so file. We see ourselves as the open source community’s partner here, fighting to keep the linux graphics stack coherent and maintainable and as a partner for the hardware OEMs to work with when they need help pushing major new initiatives around GPUs for Linux forward. And as the only linux vendor with a significant engineering footprint in GPUs we have been working closely with NVidia for a couple of years now trying to help prepare the ground for NVidia moving to a model with an open source kernel driver. An effort that has now borne fruits in terms of todays announcement from NVidia about releasing an out of tree kernel driver for their GPU. People like Kevin Martin, the manager for our GPU technologies team, Ben Skeggs the maintainer of Nouveau and Dave Airlie, the upstream kernel maintainer for the graphics subsystem, Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst and our accelerator lead Tom Rix have all taken part in meetings, code reviews and discussions on how to make this happen with NVidia over the last Month. So let me talk a little about what this release means (and also what it doesn’t mean) and what we hope to see come out of this long term.

  • NVIDIA Finally Releases Open-Source Linux GPU Kernel Modules

    NVIDIA today announced that they have started publishing their GPU kernel modules for Linux systems as open-source on GitHub as a first towards providing the community with an open NVIDIA graphics driver.

    The open-source Linux GPU kernel modules have a dual GPL/MIT license and they will be available starting with the upcoming NVIDIA 515.x.x series of their proprietary graphics driver, which entered public beta testing today with an updated installer, updated RTD3 video memory utilization threshold, improved Vulkan support, updated NVIDIA X Server Settings, and other changes.

    As you can expect, NVIDIA open-sourcing their Linux GPU kernel modules will open the door to new contributions from the Linux community to make the NVIDIA graphics driver usable on more systems and to provide users with an out-of-the-box user experience, with Canonical, Red Hat, and SUSE as the first Open Source companies to package the new open-source GPU kernel modules for their Ubuntu, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and SUSE Linux Enterprise distributions.

2 more

  • NVIDIA Transitioning To Official, Open-Source Linux GPU Kernel Driver (Phoronix) [LWN.net]

    The user-space code remains proprietary, though, which could inhibit the eventual merging of this code into the mainline kernel.

  • NVIDIA Unexpectedly Announces Open-Source GPU Kernel Modules - OMG! Ubuntu!

    Anyone off to hell this evening may want to pack warmer clothes: NVIDIA is finally embracing open source — properly.

    In a post on its blog NVIDIA announced the immediate release of open source GPU kernel modules for a crop of its current hardware. The move, it says, is the first step in a broader open source by the company aimed at “improving the experience of using NVIDIA GPUs in Linux”.

    And about time too, right?

    Canonical, backers of Ubuntu, plan to ‘package the open kernel modules’ for use in the recent Ubuntu 22.04 LTS release in short order with other Linux distro vendors set to follow suit.

NVIDIA Open-Sources GPU Linux Driver

  • In an Unexpected Move, NVIDIA Open-Sources GPU Linux Driver

    Beginning with the R515 driver release, NVIDIA provides Linux GPU kernel modules open-source under a dual GPL/MIT license.

    Today can be one of the most memorable days in Linux history. Something unprecedented happened, which the Linux community has been feverishly requesting for years but has never occurred – the Nvidia GPU driver to be open source so that it can be developed and deployed in the Linux kernel reliably and qualitatively.

Nvidia Open Sources Drivers, FOSS Is Winning

Nvidia finally releases open source GPU kernel modules for Linux

  • Nvidia finally releases open source GPU kernel modules for Linux

    It would be useful for someone to do a temperature check of Hell because after years of queries and requests, Nvidia has released on GitHub the source code for its GPU kernel modules.

    Long suffering Nvidia desktop users wishing to ditch the binary driver should temper their excitement though, with Turing and Ampere data centre GPUs being the first architecture deemed production-ready and supporting features such as multiple displays, G-SYNC, and RTX ray tracing in Vulkan, and OptiX.

    Nvidia said that desktop support was alpha quality, and users could opt in if they wanted to.

    The driver package released by Nvidia will have both the binary and open source driver, with the decision on which to use made during driver installation.

NVIDIA GPUs Go Open-Source With Its Linux Graphics Drivers

Nvidia releases open-source Linux kernel GPU driver modules

  • Nvidia releases open-source Linux kernel GPU driver modules • The Register

    Nvidia on Wednesday published the R515 driver release of its Linux GPU kernel modules under an open source, dual GPL/MIT license.

    The chip biz has made the source code available via the Nvidia Open GPU Kernel Modules repo on GitHub, a move that suggests the need to respond to AMD's long-standing open-source driver initiative.

    "This release is a significant step toward improving the experience of using Nvidia GPUs in Linux, for tighter integration with the OS and for developers to debug, integrate, and contribute back," claimed Ram Cherukuri, senior product manager, Shirish Baskaran, senior system software manager, Andy Ritger, Linux OpenGL driver engineer, and Fred Oh, senior product marketing manager, in a blog post. "For Linux distribution providers, the open-source modules increase ease of use."

  • Intel's Habana unit reveals two new A100-beating chips • The Register

    Intel is ramping up its efforts to take on GPU giant Nvidia in the accelerated computing space with a strategy that focuses on a diverse portfolio of silicon built for different purposes.

    More than two years after acquiring AI chip startup Habana Labs for $2 billion, Intel's deep learning unit is revealing two new chips, Gaudi2 for training and Greco for inference. The x86 giant claims the former can leapfrog Nvidia's two-year-old A100 GPU in performance, at least based on their own benchmarking.

NVIDIA releases open source Linux GPU kernel modules

NVIDIA open source video drivers for Linux kernel

  • NVIDIA open source video drivers for Linux kernel - LinuxStoney

    NVIDIA has announced the open source of all kernel modules supplied in its proprietary video driver suite. The code is open source under MIT and GPLv2 licenses. The ability to build modules is provided for the x86_64 and aarch64 architectures on systems with the Linux 3.10 kernel and newer releases. Firmware and user-space libraries such as the CUDA, OpenGL, and Vulkan stacks remain proprietary.

    It is expected that the publication of the code will lead to a significant increase in the usability of NVIDIA GPUs on Linux systems, enhance integration with the operating system, and simplify the delivery of drivers and debugging problems. Ubuntu and SUSE developers have already announced the formation of packages based on open modules. Having open modules will also make it easier to integrate NVIDIA drivers with systems based on non-standard custom builds of the Linux kernel. For NVIDIA, open source will improve the quality and security of Linux drivers through greater community engagement and the ability for third-party review and independent audits.

  • Nvidia open sources GPU Kernel modules for Linux: How will that be Beneficial? - Boiling Steam

    Today is almost a historic day, as Nvidia has posted a long announcement regarding the fact that they are releasing open-source (GPL/MIT dual license) Kernel modules for their GPUs. There’s already a github repo where you can see and contribute to their code.

Several more

  • NVIDIA open source Linux GPU kernel modules - Geeky Gadgets

    NVIDIA has this week announced it is now publishing Linux GPU kernel modules as open source with dual GPL/MIT license. First making available the R515 driver with the source code now available for the kernel modules on GitHub. NVIDIA has taken the step to help improve the experience of using NVIDIA GPUs in Linux and offer tighter integration with the operating system enabling developers to debug integrate, and contribute back, says the press release.

  • NVIDIA Takes a Big Step to Improve its GPU Experience on Linux - It's FOSS News

    Linus Torvalds will be happy to hear this…

    NVIDIA finally announced an open-source initiative to improve the GPU experience on Linux.

    Unfortunately, it isn’t exactly what you think, you will still find proprietary drivers around.

    But, it’s as significant as ditching the proprietary drivers.

    Here it is: NVIDIA released open-source GPU kernel modules with support for data center GPUs and consumer (GeForce/RTX) cards.

  • 4 reasons why NVIDIA's new FOSS drivers aren't what you think they are. - Invidious

    Don't get me wrong. This is _really_ cool (and unexpected) stuff. But it took *many* attempts and years of work before AMD's FOSS drivers were accepted into the kernel. NVIDIA has a very long road ahead of them.

  • Nvidia Open-Sources Linux Drivers | Tom's Hardware

    Nvidia has announced that it will be open-sourcing the Linux drivers for its graphics cards, starting with the R515 release, using a dual GPL/MIT license. The source code for the kernel modules will be available in the NVIDIA Open GPU Kernel Modules repo on GitHub, but at the moment only the code for data center GPUs is considered production-ready. GeForce and Workstation GPUs are considered "alpha quality" at this time.

  • Nvidia Open Sources Linux Drivers

    Nvidia is open sourcing the Linux drivers for its graphics cards, and the source code for the kernel modules will be available on GitHub, reports Ian Evenden. Currently, only the code for data center GPUs is production-ready, with code for workstation GPUs considered to be "alpha” quality.

Nvidia Latest

  • Not all open-source leaders are jerks • The Register

    You might be excused if you think most Linux and open-source leaders are, ah, rude.

    If you follow open-source at all, you know the stories about Linux's founder, Linus Torvalds, giving Nvidia the finger for its lack of Linux support and his stomping all over developers on the Linux Kernel Mailing List when they blunder.

  • Nvidia Releases Open-Source Linux GPU Drivers, With a Catch

    Gaming on Linux has always been a bit more complicated than on Windows (or game consoles), and one reason for that is Nvidia’s poor driver support on Linux. That’s now changing, though it’s unclear how much the situation will improve.

    Nvidia announced on Wednesday that it has published its Linux graphics kernel modules as open-source software, under a dual GPL/MIT license. In other words, anyone can now look through Nvidia’s code, and developers can submit fixes and new features to improve the drivers. Canonical (developers of Ubuntu Linux), SUSE, and Red Hat (developers of Fedora Linux) applauded Nvidia’s decision to finally open-source its Linux graphics drivers.

    Nvidia said in its blog post, “In this open-source release, support for GeForce and Workstation GPUs is alpha-quality. GeForce and Workstation users can use this driver on NVIDIA Turing and NVIDIA Ampere Architecture GPUs to run Linux desktops and use features such as multiple displays, G-SYNC, and NVIDIA RTX ray tracing in Vulkan and NVIDIA OptiX.”

  • Nvidia Open Sources Linux Drivers!! But There's A Catch - Invidious

    For years people have wanted Nvidia to open source there Linux drivers and finally they've done so however it's not that simple and big parts of the driver stack will remain proprietary including the CUDA, Vulkan and OpenGL support.

Nvidia takes first step toward open source Linux GPU drivers

  • Nvidia takes first step toward open source Linux GPU drivers

    After years of hinting, Nvidia announced yesterday that it would be open-sourcing part of its Linux GPU driver, as both Intel and AMD have done for years now. Previously, Linux users who wanted to avoid Nvidia's proprietary driver had to rely on reverse-engineered software like the Nouveau project, which worked best on older hardware and offered incomplete support at best for all of Nvidia's GPU features.

    "This release is a significant step toward improving the experience of using NVIDIA GPUs in Linux, for tighter integration with the OS, and for developers to debug, integrate, and contribute back," says a blog post attributed to several Nvidia employees. "For Linux distribution providers, the open source modules increase ease of use. They also improve the out-of-the-box user experience to sign and distribute the NVIDIA GPU driver. Canonical and SUSE are able to immediately package the open kernel modules with Ubuntu and SUSE Linux Enterprise Distributions."

  • NVIDIA releases its Linux driver as open source - itsfoss.net

    The relationship of NVIDIA with Linux has never been good. The company, a leader in graphics processing and in sectors such as artificial intelligence, has tended to clash with just about everyone for its consistent refusal to adopt standards. However, the situation could start to turn 180 degrees, as NVIDIA has published a Official Open Source driver for Linux. Yes, as you are reading it, but it would still be better to contain the euphoria.

    NVIDIA has provided support for Linux for two decades through a proprietary driver that it has developed to share as much code as possible across all supported operating systems, including Windows, Solaris, and the BSD spectrum. This driver has always been closely tied to X11 and in recent years it has been a victim of the company’s bad decisions, some bad decisions that within the Linux desktop have placed it as the last in terms of quality of support, especially when we talk about of Wayland.

IDG

  • Nvidia Plans To Open-source Part Of Its Linux GPU Driver - IT World Canada

    Nvidia has announced plans to open-source part of its Linux GPU drivers joining both Intel and AMD. This mark the first step toward open-source parity for Nvidia’s Linux driver packages.

    “This release is a significant step toward improving the experience of using NVIDIA GPUs in Linux, for tighter integration with the OS, and for developers to debug, integrate, and contribute back. For Linux distribution providers, the open source modules increase ease of use. They also improve the out-of-the-box user experience to sign and distribute the NVIDIA GPU driver. Canonical and SUSE can immediately package the open kernel modules with Ubuntu and SUSE Linux Enterprise Distributions,” states a blog post attributed to Nvidia employees.

Nvidia GPUs Are Starting To Embrace Linux More

  • Nvidia GPUs Are Starting To Embrace Linux More

    It's still a rather uncertain time to be a PC gamer. While graphics card prices are continuing to come down for both AMD and Nvidia products, there's also the ongoing supply issues that have been plaguing the market for what feels like ages now. That aside, however, both companies, along with newcomers Intel, are still keen to keep pushing out new hardware despite the shortages, and it's now looking like team green is moving into more open-source territories for the first time.

    According to a recent blog post on the company website, as spotted by PC Gamer, Nvidia has just released some open-source GPU kernel modules for use in Linux-based operating systems. The post goes on to say that this represents a "significant step towards" making its graphics cards better suited for the alternative system. As a result, this could be the start of Linux users being able to use team green's products with greater ease. The report from PC Gamer goes on to say that, traditionally, users would have to stick with Nvidia's "proprietary drivers," which have not always been reliable.

NVIDIA Releases Drivers With Openness Flavor

  • NVIDIA Releases Drivers With Openness Flavor

    This year, we’ve already seen sizeable leaks of NVIDIA source code, and a release of open-source drivers for NVIDIA Tegra. It seems NVIDIA decided to amp it up, and just released open-source GPU kernel modules for Linux. The GitHub link named open-gpu-kernel-modules has people rejoice, and we are already testing the code out, making memes and speculating about the future. This driver is currently claimed to be experimental, only “production-ready” for datacenter cards – but you can already try it out!

Linux Nvidia GeForce GPU drivers move to become open source

  • Linux Nvidia GeForce GPU drivers move to become open source

    Nvidia GeForce GPU drivers on Linux are finally set to become open source, as the company has announced it will now publish kernel modules. While AMD is better known for openness when it comes to software, the green team has uploaded source code for its R515 drivers onto Github, facilitating a better experience for gaming PCs using the Unix-like operating system.

Who Is Thinking About Open Source Firmware?

  • Who Is Thinking About Open Source Firmware?

    Yesterday, we ran a post on NVIDIA’s announcement of open-source drivers for some of its most recent video cards. And Hackaday being huge proponents of open-source software and hardware, you’d think we’d be pouring the champagne. But it’s trickier than that.

NVIDIA transitioning to official

  • NVIDIA transitioning to official, open-source Linux GPU kernel driver – OSnews

    NVIDIA is open sourcing all of its kernel driver modules, for both enterprise stuff and desktop hardware, under both the GPL and MIT license, it will available on Github, and NVIDIA welcomes community contributions where they make sense. This isn’t just throwing the open source community a random bone – this looks and feels like the real deal. They’re even aiming to have their open source driver mainlined into the Linux kernel once API/ABI has stabalised.

    This is a massive win for the open source community, and I am incredibly excited about what this will mean for the future of the Linux desktop.

NVIDIA has open-sourced its Linux GPU kernel drivers

  • NVIDIA has open-sourced its Linux GPU kernel drivers

    NVIDIA has published the source code of its Linux kernel modules for the R515 driver, allowing developers to provide greater integration, stability, and security for Linux distributions.

    The source code has been published to NVIDIA's GitHub repository under a dual licensing model that combines the GPL and MIT licenses, making the modules legally re-distributable.

    The products supported by these drivers include all models built on the Turing and Ampere architecture, released after 2018, including the GeForce 30 and GeForce 20 series, the GTX 1650 and 1660, and data center-grade A series, Tesla, and Quadro RTX.

    According to the GPU maker, this is a step toward improving its products' experience on the Linux platform, simplifying the integration process in Linux distributions, debugging, and boosting contribution activity.

NVIDIA Recap

  • NVIDIA Recap: ASUS x Noctua RTX 3080, LHR Full Bypass, Linux Driver Open-Sourced, and more

    We’ll need to take a trip back to February when cybercriminals group Lapsus$ claimed that they have hacked NVIDIA and stolen nearly 1TB of confidential data but they did not demand stuff like a stated number of cryptocurrencies to be paid as ransom rather they want the source code of LHR to be publicized. While the GPU giant didn’t cave in to those demands, today we have NiceHash somehow done the job for NVIDIA while Team Green pulled another gun out of their sleeve which is open-sourcing its GPU driver for Linux kernels.

    Despite being the slowest compared to the likes of Intel and AMD that have been doing for like several years, this will finally mark an end to big brain Linux engineers chugging away coffees and energy drinks to try and reverse engineer drivers just to get them working on not only just Linux but also legacy hardware and dedicated distros.

    But there’s a catch. NVIDIA is currently doing this under a dual MIT/GPL license which does not include driver parts that run in user space including but not limited to OpenGL, Vulkan, OpenCL, CUDA, and GPU System Processor (GSP) firmware for which all of these would be proprietary, confidential, and released with pre-built binaries. Additionally, only the GTX 1600 series, RTX 20, and 30 series are included in the support list. Anything older than that is a big NO.

    In short, unless you want to contribute to this new yet familiar Linux GPU scene or simply be the lab rat yourself, you don’t really have a practical reason to jump the gun this early.

NVIDIA Releases Open-Source GPU Kernel Modules

  • NVIDIA Releases Open-Source GPU Kernel Modules

    This release is a significant step toward improving the experience of using NVIDIA GPUs in Linux, for tighter integration with the OS and for developers to debug, integrate, and contribute back. For Linux distribution providers, the open-source modules increase ease of use. They also improve the out-of-the-box user experience to sign and distribute the NVIDIA GPU driver. Canonical and SUSE are able to immediately package the open kernel modules with Ubuntu and SUSE Linux Enterprise Distributions.

    Developers can trace into code paths and see how kernel event scheduling is interacting with their workload for faster root cause debugging. In addition, enterprise software developers can now integrate the driver seamlessly into the customized Linux kernel configured for their project.

    This will further help improve NVIDIA GPU driver quality and security with input and reviews from the Linux end-user community.

    With each new driver release, NVIDIA publishes a snapshot of the source code on GitHub. Community submitted patches are reviewed and if approved, integrated into a future driver release.

    Refer to the NVIDIA contribution guidelines and overview of the driver release cadence and life-cycle documentation for more information.

What NVIDIA’s Open-Source Driver Means for Linux

  • What NVIDIA’s Open-Source Driver Means for Linux

    NVIDIA has recently open-sourced a Linux GPU driver. Does that change things for the Linux gaming community? What's the next step?

    NVIDIA graphics cards are well-known for their performance. In the Linux world, they’re known for something else too—frustration with drivers. So much frustration that you may have come across a video or GIF of Linux founder Linus Torvalds referring to NVIDIA with a middle finger. That’s why it’s big news that NVIDIA has finally released an open-source kernel driver for their GPUs.

Nvidia releases its first open-source Linux drivers

  • [Older] Nvidia releases its first open-source Linux drivers

    Linux users are a self-sufficient bunch, but when it comes to hardware, they’re often at the mercy of enormous manufacturers to get working drivers. While Nvidia has offered proprietary drivers similar to its Windows offerings for years, the company is changing tack and will now publish open-source GPU drivers. The initial offerings are now live on Github as well as Nvidia’s self-hosted download pages.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Install Fail2ban on Ubuntu 22.04

    Fail2ban is a free and open-source IPS that helps administrators safeguard Linux servers against brute-force assaults. Python-based Fail2ban has filters for Apache2, SSH, FTP, etc. Fail2ban blocks the IP addresses of fraudulent login attempts. Fail2ban scans service log files (e.g. /var/log/auth.log) and bans IP addresses that reveal fraudulent login attempts, such as too many wrong passwords, seeking vulnerabilities, etc. Fail2ban supports iptables, ufw, and firewalld. Set up email alerts for blocked login attempts. In this guide, we’ll install and configure Fail2ban to secure Ubuntu 22.04. This article provides fail2ban-client commands for administering Fail2ban service and prisons.

  • How to install software packages on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) | Enable Sysadmin

    There's a lot of flexibility in how you install an application on Linux. It's partly up to the software's developer to decide how to deliver it to you. In many cases, there's more than one "right" way to install something.

  • What is the /etc/hosts file in Linux – TecAdmin

    /etc/hosts is a text file on a computer that maps hostnames to IP addresses. It is used for static name resolution, which is not updated automatically like the Domain Name System (DNS) records. /etc/hosts are usually the first file checked when resolving a domain name, so it can be used to block websites or redirect users to different websites.

Accessibility in Fedora Workstation

The first concerted effort to support accessibility under Linux was undertaken by Sun Microsystems when they decided to use GNOME for Solaris. Sun put together a team focused on building the pieces to make GNOME 2 fully accessible and worked with hardware makers to make sure things like Braille devices worked well. I even heard claims that GNOME and Linux had the best accessibility of any operating system for a while due to this effort. As Sun started struggling and got acquired by Oracle this accessibility effort eventually trailed off with the community trying to pick up the slack afterwards. Especially engineers from Igalia were quite active for a while trying to keep the accessibility support working well. But over the years we definitely lost a bit of focus on this and we know that various parts of GNOME 3 for instance aren’t great in terms of accessibility. So at Red Hat we have had a lot of focus over the last few years trying to ensure we are mindful about diversity and inclusion when hiring, trying to ensure that we don’t accidentally pre-select against underrepresented groups based on for instance gender or ethnicity. But one area we realized we hadn’t given so much focus recently was around technologies that allowed people with various disabilities to make use of our software. Thus I am very happy to announce that Red Hat has just hired Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer, to lead our effort in making sure Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora Workstation has excellent accessibility support! Read more

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi Zero Prints Giant Pictures with Thermal Receipt Printer

It’s no secret that thermal receipt printers can print much more than receipts, but this Raspberry Pi project, created by a maker known as -PJFry- on Reddit, has taken the idea to a new extreme. With the help of a Raspberry Pi Zero, they’ve coded an application to print huge, poster-sized images (opens in new tab) one strip at a time on their thermal printer. Inspiration for this project came from similar online projects where users print large-scale images using regular printers or thermal printers like the one used in this project. In this case, however, -PJFry- coded the project application from scratch to work on the Pi Zero. It works by taking an image and breaking it into pieces that fit across the width of the receipt printer and printing it one strip at a time. Then, these strips can be lined up to create a full-sized image. It is the only microelectronics project we can find that -PJFry- has shared, but it’s clear they have a great understanding of our favorite SBC to craft something this creative from scratch. According to -PJFry-, the project wasn’t created for efficiency but more for fun as a proof of concept. The result is exciting and provides an artistic take on the Raspberry Pi’s potential. Read more