Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Seeed launches BeagleV, a $150 RISC-V computer designed to run Linux

Filed under
Linux

Seeed Studios—the makers of the Odyssey mini-PC we reviewed back in August—have teamed up with well-known SBC vendor BeagleBoard to produce an affordable RISC-V system designed to run Linux.

The new BeagleV (pronounced "Beagle Five") system features a dual-core, 1GHz RISC-V CPU made by StarFive—one of a network of RISC-V startups created by better-known RISC-V vendor SiFive. The CPU is based on two of SiFive's U74 Standard Cores—and unlike simpler microcontroller-only designs, it features a MMU and all the other trimmings necessary to run full-fledged modern operating systems such as Linux distributions.

Read more

$119+ BeagleV powerful, open-hardware RISC-V Linux SBC targets

  • $119+ BeagleV powerful, open-hardware RISC-V Linux SBC targets AI applications

    Running Linux on RISC-V hardware is already possible, but you’d have a choice of low-end platforms like Kendryte K210 that’s not really practical for anything, or higher-end board like SiFive HiFive Unmatched or PolarBerry for which you’d have to spend several hundred dollars, or even over one thousand dollars to have a complete system.

    So an affordable, usable RISC-V Linux SBC is clearly needed. We previously wrote about an upcoming Allwinner RISC-V Linux SBC that will be mostly useful for camera applications without 3D GPU, and a maximum of 256MB RAM. But today, we have excellent news, as the BeagleBoard.org foundation, Seeed Studio, and Chinese fanless silicon vendor Starfive partnered to design and launch the BeagleV SBC (pronounced Beagle Five) powered by StarFive JH7100 dual-core SiFive U74 RISC-V processor with Vision DSP, NVDLA engine, and neural network engine for AI acceleration.

BeagleV is a RISC-V single board PC for $150 or less

  • BeagleV is a RISC-V single board PC for $150 or less

    Since the first Raspberry Pi launched almost a decade ago, there’s been an explosion of small, inexpensive single-board computers with ARM-based processors and support for Linux-based operating systems.

    The new BeagleV is a little different. It’s a small single-board PC with a RISC-V processor and support for several different GNU/Linux distributions as well as freeRTOS.

    With prices ranging from $120 to $150, the BeagleV is pricier than a Raspberry Pi computer, but it’s one of the most affordable and versatile options to feature a RISC-V processor. The makers of the BeagleV plan to begin shipping the first boards in April and you can sign up to apply for a chance to buy one of the first at the BeagleV website.

Introducing the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run...

  • Introducing the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run Linux

    Seeed and BeagleBoard.org® have announced an official collaboration with the leading RISC-V solutions provider, StarFive, to create the latest member of the BeagleBoard.org® series, BeagleV™ (pronounced Beagle five.) BeagleV™ is the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run Linux. BeagleV™, pushes open-source to the next level and gives developers more freedom and power to innovate and design industry leading solutions with an affordable introductory price of $149 followed by lower cost variants in subsequent releases.

    [...]

    BeagleV™ supports a high-level of flexibility in development, which gives Linux users, Kernel, and BSP developers more flexibility from silicon to hardware. The social and community value of this development board is to elevate open-source to the next level, and the three parties are embracing this and pushing it further to enable the evolution of science and technology industries. BeagleV™ marks the first time that hardware development has ever achieved this level of freedom and openness, and the significance of the revolutionary collaboration is the shared purpose of the three parties, which is to make the open-source community stronger and more sustainable.

At Last: an Affordable RISC-V Board With Desktop Linux Support

  • At Last: an Affordable RISC-V Board With Desktop Linux Support

    Tech tinkerers keen to tussle with RISC-V will be thrilled to hear there’s an affordable new ‘toy’ in town: the BeagleV.

    The BeagleV (pronounced ‘beagle-five’) is a small single-board PC (think Raspberry Pi) that uses a RISC-V processor, touts support for several different Linux distributions (including desktop Fedora), and is priced from a comparatively cheap $119.

    For more on this device, who it’s aimed at, and what it’s specs are like, keep reading.

Comments in Slashdot

  • BeagleV is a $150 RISC-V Computer Designed To Run Linux

    Seeed Studios -- the makers of the Odyssey mini-PC -- have teamed up with well-known SBC vendor BeagleBoard to produce an affordable RISC-V system designed to run Linux. The new BeagleV (pronounced "Beagle Five") system features a dual-core, 1GHz RISC-V CPU made by StarFive -- one of a network of RISC-V startups created by better-known RISC-V vendor SiFive.

BeagleV SBC runs Linux on AI-enabled RISC-V SoC

  • BeagleV SBC runs Linux on AI-enabled RISC-V SoC

    BeagleBoard.org and Seeed unveiled an open-spec, $119-and-up “BeagleV” SBC with a StarFive JH7100 SoC with dual SiFive U74 RISC-V cores, 1-TOPS NPU, DSP, and VPU. The SBC ditches the Cape expansion for a Pi-like 40-pin GPIO.

    In our introduction to last week’s catalog of 150 Linux hacker boards we speculated that 2021 would reveal the first Linux-based community-backed board with a RISC-V processor under $200. We did not have to wait long. BeagleBoard.org, Seeed Studio, and chip designer StarFive have announced an open hardware, RISC-V based BeagleV SBC due to sample in April for $149 with 8GB RAM and ship in volume in September along with a $119 board with 4GB.

BeagleBoard.org and Seeed Introduce the First Affordable RISC-V

  • BeagleBoard.org and Seeed Introduce the First Affordable RISC-V Board Designed to Run Linux

    Seeed and BeagleBoard.org® have announced an official collaboration with the leading RISC-V solutions provider, StarFive, to create the latest member of the BeagleBoard.org® series, BeagleV™ (pronounced Beagle five). BeagleV™ is the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run Linux. BeagleV™, pushes open-source to the next level and gives developers more freedom and power to innovate and design industry leading solutions with an affordable introductory price of $149 followed by lower cost variants in subsequent releases.

    BeagleV™ will be available for early access in March with larger availability in September. The early access version encompasses StarFive Jinghong 7100 SoC with powerful AI performance (3.5T NVDLA, 1T NNE), built-in ISP, 1 Gigabit ethernet, and a dual core 64-bit SiFive U74 RISC-V CPU with 8GB of LPDDR4 memory. It also has a dedicated hardware encoder/decoder supporting H.264 and H.265 4k@60fps, making it a perfect edge computing device with powerful AI capability. Supported by mainline Linux and a Debian-based BeagleBoard.org® open-source software image, BeagleV™ is ready for development out-of-the-box and prepared for the future.

BeagleV: An Affordable RISC-V Computer Designed to Run Linux

  • BeagleV: An Affordable RISC-V Computer Designed to Run Linux

    BeagleV is a single board computer (SBC) that runs Linux out of the box. The computer has been announced by Seeed Studio and Beagleboard.org in collaboration with SiFive (Star Five).

    The BeagleV runs on a RISC-V CPU that is capable of running Linux and can also be used in edge compute applications such as training autonomous vehicles, object detection, speech processing and many more workloads related to AI.

BeagleV is a RISC-V single board PC for $150 or less

New Beagle Board Offers Dual-Core RISC-V

  • New Beagle Board Offers Dual-Core RISC-V, Targets AI Applications

    We’ve been tracking the rise of RISC-V since the ISA debuted nearly a decade ago. While the highest-performing RISC-V CPUs are still far behind their x86 or ARM equivalents, the absolute level of performance you can get from a RISC-V core is increasing rapidly. Even better, especially for those who like experimenting with new architectures, the cost is coming down.

    It’s been possible to buy a RISC-V board before this, but the options have been limited, particularly for the money you’d spend. We discussed an expensive SiFive option last year — a quad-core chip, in that case — but there’s now a much cheaper Beagle board option.

BeagleV: A powerful RISC-V single-board computer that runs Linux

  • BeagleV: A powerful RISC-V single-board computer that runs Linux from US$119

    There are many single-board computers about, but few are powerful and have RISC-V processors. The BeagleV is an example of a board that fits that criteria though, thanks to its SiFive U74 processor. The BeagleV is comparatively affordable, too. The SiFive U74 has two cores clocked at 1.5 GHz and 2 MB of L2 cache, which compete with the performance that something like an ARM Cortex-A55 processor.

    The SiFive U74 also includes an NVDLA Engine, a Vision DSP Tensilica-VP6, a Neural Network Engine and an audio processing DSP, among other components. Initial BeagleV boards will ship without a GPU, but future batches should ship with one from Imagination Technologies. According to CNX Software, BeagleV boards with GPUs should begin shipping in September 2021.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE: YaST Development Sprint and Digest of YaST Development Sprint

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 116

    Let’s start with an installer improvement quite some people was waiting for. Both openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise can use either wicked or NetworkManager to handle the system’s network configuration. Only the former can be fully configured with YaST (which is generally not a problem because there are plenty of tools to configure NetworkManager). Moreover, during the standard installation process, wicked is always used to setup the network of the installer itself. If the user decides to rely on wicked also in the final system, then the configuration of the installer is carried over to it. But, so far, if the user opted to use NetworkManager then the installer configuration was lost and the network of the final system had to be be configured again using NetworkManager this time. Not anymore! That’s not the only installer behavior we have refined based on feedback from our users. In some scenarios, the logic used to decide whether an existing EFI System Partition (ESP) could be reused was getting in the way of those aiming for a fine-grained control of their partitions. That should now be fixed by the changes described in this pull request, that have been already submitted to Tumbleweed and will be part of the upcoming releases (15.3) of both openSUSE Leap and SLE.

  • Session One Meetup Generates Enhancements, Actions

    The first session of the openSUSE Project’s meetup regarding the End of the Year Survey Results on Jan. 23 is already starting produce some actionable items from contributors. The session on openSUSE’s Jitsi instance had engagement from about 20 people from around the globe. Topics discussed in the two-hour session focused on addressing pain points, transferring knowledge and promoting openSUSE projects. Members of the “let’s improve the openSUSE learning experience” shared statics and analysis from the survey and attendees engaged in generating ideas and actions to enhance and improve the above mentioned items.

The 10 Best Linux Server Distributions [2021 Edition]

One of the best things about Linux is the various types of distributions it has to offer. No matter how you plan to use your Linux PC, there’s a Linux distro optimized with all the necessary tools and functionalities to meet your needs. And this brings us to Linux server distributions – Linux distros optimized to be used on servers. These are lightweight Linux distros, sometimes even stripped of a desktop environment, and packed with tools to improve speed, stability, and security – the traits of a good server OS. But with that being said, there are literally hundreds of Linux server distros circulating the internet. So which one should you choose for your home server or even for professional use? Well, to answer your question, we have put together a comprehensive list of the 10 best Linux Server Distributions for 2021. [...] So this brings us to the end of our list of the 10 best Linux server distributions of 2021. We hope this was useful and helped you find the right Linux server distro for your specific needs and requirements. All the server distros come with their own unique advantages and disadvantages, as you can see. If you are completely new, we recommend starting with a Ubuntu server. With time, you’ll understand what features you need and then migrate to a distro that delivers those functionalities. But that being said, this is by no means a comprehensive list of all the best Linux server distros out there. So if your favorite distro didn’t make it up on this list, then feel free to mention it down in the comments along with why you prefer it over the options discussed here. We would surely like to know. Read more

openSUSE "Leap" 15.2 - Any Good?

This is a review I've been wanting to write since forever. Having tried many iterations of SUSE Linux over its long life before, during and after the Novell era, it always left me feeling ambivalent. And I really wanted to like it. The last time I set out to write a review but then canned the idea was for 12.3, when images would work in VMware Player but did not boot on my real hardware. Now THAT is a long time ago and it also means a lot may have changed, hopefully for the better. SUSE is known and often praised for their offering of a highly polished KDE desktop. This is what I will go for in this little experiment. On the download page we can choose between a netinstall image for openSUSE "Leap" approx. 125 MB in size for x86_64 and the full DVD image of 4.3 GB. This is the equivalent of the box set of olden days. Live images are available with the KDE Plasma and Gnome desktops as well as a Rescue Live CD which are all staying under 1 GB in size, but only the rescue image is small enough to burn to CD. All images can be written to USB and DVD. Community maintained ports are also available for ARM, the Raspberry Pi and PPC architectures. Instructions to install or change to "Leap" as well as minimum system requirements are further down the page. Quite a traditional selection really. The web page layout is simple and clear and conveys the most pertinent information right away. Years ago installing from live image was not recommended so the choice here is basically between downloading the entire library or the netinstall image. I decided to go for the netinstall. Not having an installable live image obviously robs us of the test run people have become accustomed to unless we down yet another image just for testing. I decided against that as we can see from the netinstall image whether openSUSE will boot up or not. The rest is just desktop showcasing. I downloaded images for the x86_64 architecture. Read more

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Two Powerful SSD Benchmark Utilities for Linux

    The 21st century has seen unprecedented growth in the technological sector, and many upgrades have been made in the past several years. The evolution of phones from landlines to smartphones is a clear indicator of this technological phenomenon. The latter has become a key part of our lives, providing us a means to connect with the world around us. The desktops and laptops that we use today have also seen major progression, and this can be observed in the improvement in the quality of tools and games in the world of computers. One such sector in the computer world is that of memory storage, which has quickly moved on from traditional hard disks to a newer, faster type of storage called a solid-state drive, or SSD for short. SSDs are extremely fast, require less power, and are more shock-resistant than HDDs. You can see this for yourself by benchmarking your SSDs. Benchmarking is the process of measuring the performance of any tool, which can be done using a benchmarking utility. This article looks at two of the best utilities available for SSD benchmarking in the Linux operating system, Disks and hdparm.

  • Radeon ROCm 4.0.1 Released For AMD Open-Source GPU Compute

    Last month marked the release of the big Radeon Open eCosystem 4.0 update (ROCm 4.0) while today that has been replaced by a v4.0.1 point release. ROCm 4.0 brought CDNA / MI100 (Arcturus) compute support and other "Exascale Era" preparations in making this open-source GPU compute stack competitor more competitive with NVIDIA's CUDA. For now though it's still been leaving out the Navi GPU support.

  • Linux Foundation Public Health Joins The Fight Against COVID-19 Pandemic

    Brian Behlendorf is one of the most respected luminaries of the open-source world. He has been heading the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger project since its inception and recently took over additional responsibilities of the Linux Foundation Public Health.