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Raspberry Pis and Arduino Projects

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Hardware
  • Xen Project officially ports its hypervisor to Raspberry Pi 4

    The idea to do an official port bubbled up from the Xen community and then reached the desk of George Dunlap, chairman of the Xen Project’s Advisory Board. Dunlap mentioned the idea to an acquaintance who works at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and was told that around 40 percent of Pis are sold to business users rather than hobbyists.

    With more than 30 million Arm-based Pis sold as of December 2019, and sales running at a brisk 600,000-plus a month in April 2020, according to Pi guy Eben Upton, Dunlap saw an opportunity to continue Xen’s drive towards embedded and industrial applications.

    Stefano Stabellini, who by day works at FPGA outfit Xilinx, and past Apache Foundation director Roman Shaposhnik took on the task of the port. The pair clocked that the RPi 4's system-on-chip used a regular GIC-400 interrupt controller, which Xen supports out of the box, and thought this was a sign this would, overall, be an easy enough job. That, the duo admitted, was dangerous optimism. Forget the IRQs, there was a whole world of physical and virtual memory addresses to navigate.

    The pair were “utterly oblivious that we were about to embark on an adventure deep in the belly of the Xen memory allocator and Linux address translation layers,” we're told.

    “The first hurdle was the availability of low memory addresses,” the pair wrote in an announcement heralding the Xen Pi port, seen by The Register ahead of its public release today. “RPi4 has devices that can only access the first 1GB of RAM. The amount of memory below 1GB in Dom0 was not enough. Julien Grall solved this problem with a simple one-line fix to increase the memory allocation below 1GB for Dom0 on RPi4. The patch is now present in Xen 4.14.”

  • Xen Project Officially Ports Its Hypervisor To Raspberry Pi 4
  • Xen on Raspberry Pi 4 adventures

    Raspberry Pi (RPi) has been a key enabling device for the Arm community for years, given the low price and widespread adoption. According to the RPi Foundation, over 35 million have been sold, with 44% of these sold into industry. We have always been eager to get the Xen hypervisor running on it, but technical differences between RPi and other Arm platforms made it impractical for the longest time. Specifically, a non-standard interrupt controller without virtualization support.

    Then the Raspberry Pi 4 came along, together with a regular GIC-400 interrupt controller that Xen supports out of the box. Finally, we could run Xen on an RPi device. Soon Roman Shaposhnik of Project EVE and a few other community members started asking about it on the xen-devel mailing list. “It should be easy,” we answered. “It might even work out of the box,” we wrote in our reply. We were utterly oblivious that we were about to embark on an adventure deep in the belly of the Xen memory allocator and Linux address translation layers.

  • Raspberry Pi CM3+ based Iono Pi Max industrial controller comes with an impressive number of I/Os

    As the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 is only expected for next year, companies are still launching products based on Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ (CM3+), and Sfera Labs has just introduced Iono Pi Max industrial computer powered by a Raspberry Pi CM3+ system-on-module.

    Housed in a DIN rail enclosure, the Linux controller offers Fast Ethernet, three USB ports, isolated CAN and serial boards, some analog I/Os, a relay, as well as a real-time clock (RTC), integrated UPS, and more.

  • FPGA Meets Breadboard with Mercury 2 Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA Development Board

    All those boards are however based on entry-level FPGAs like Lattice Semi ICE40 or QuickLogic EOS S3, and if you’d like a more powerful FPGA board that fits into a breadboard, MicroNova Mercury 2 development board may meet your requirements with a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA.

    [...]

    The baseboard comes with a 64-bit socket for the FPGA devboard, as well as a 4-digit seven-segment display, four push-buttons & eight toggle switches, a PS/2! port for keyboard or mouse, a VGA port, a Pmod-compatible connector, 3.5mm audio jacks, an analog temperature sensor, a light sensor, and a potentiometer for use with the analog-to-digital converter.

  • How a Half-Dozen Raspberry Pis Help Keep This Maine Oyster Farm Afloat

    Running Tide built a 60-by-24-foot oyster processing boat, now docked in a finger of Casco Bay in the town of Harpswell, with two oyster reefs floating at each end of the vessel. Inside the processing boat are a half-dozen Raspberry Pis that feed data to the cloud on water conditions, including temperature and acidity. The boat is essentially a huge catamaran that allows the 11-by-36-foot oyster reefs to float into it.

    Running Tide’s Margaux Filippi, who has a PhD. from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, said the company is working on underwater video cameras to monitor the oysters’ growth. The 29-year-old data scientist has built machine learning algorithms for ocean research and spent six years at MIT’s mechanical engineering department, where she mastered the process of rapid prototyping. She clearly enjoys Running Tide’s hacker culture.

  • Watch your houseplant’s growth really take off in this Saturn V planter

    A switch on the front lights up the printed flame assemblies emanating from the engines, using a trio of SMD LEDs on each exhaust. These LEDs are controlled by an Arduino Nano nestled inside the wooden base to produce random lighting effects when an activation button is pressed.

  • This interactive screen slides smoothly from side to side

    When you need to grab someone’s attention at an event, an interactive screen is a good idea. MakerMan, however, went several steps beyond this, creating an installation with a bank of static screens that depict the Moscow skyline. In front of this, a single touch-enabled display moves back and forth automatically to present information on various points of interest.

    Sliding action is handled by a large stepper motor, which pulls the screen along on a carriage assembly. The motor, in turn, is controlled via an Arduino Uno and a stepper driver. All of these electronics are hidden behind a nicely painted wooden facade, letting the technology driving it fade elegantly into the background.

More on RasPi

Xen: Our hypervisor now runs on Raspberry Pi 4

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to install CentOS 8 workstation

    CentOS is a rock-solid, reliable Linux distribution similar to Debian, but with RPMs and RedHat technology rather than DEB and Debian tech. It’s used a lot on servers, but did you know that you can also use it as a desktop Linux distribution?

  • Adding a USB Datastore and Creating a VM on ESXi on Arm -- Virtualization Review

    I downloaded the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS iso and used SCP to copy it over to the USB drive on my ESXi server. I also used the host client to create a 3 vCPU, 2GB RAM VM on it. I started the VM, opened a console to it, and installed Ubuntu by using the defaults. This took longer than it did on my x86 servers, but it did get created nevertheless, and I was able to use the console and SSH to access it.

  • How to install Minecraft on Deepin 20 - YouTube
  • TCP Analysis with Wireshark | Linux Journal

    Transmission Control is an essential aspect of network activity and governs the behavior of many services we take for granted. When sending your emails or just browsing the web you are relying on TCP to send and receive your packets in a reliable fashion. Thanks to two DARPA scientists, Vinton Cerf and Bob Kahn who developed TCP/IP in 1970, we have a specific set of rules that define how we communicate over a network. When Vinton and Bob first conceptualized TCP/IP, they set up a basic network topology and a device that can interface between two other hosts.

WordPress 5.6 Second Beta and WordPress Survey

  • News – WordPress 5.6 Beta 2 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 beta 2 is now available for testing! This software is still in development, so we recommend that you run this version on a test site.

  • News – Take the 2020 WordPress Annual Survey (and view the 2019 results)! – WordPress.org

    For many years, WordPress enthusiasts have filled out an annual survey to share their experiences and feelings about WordPress. Interesting results from this survey have been shared in the annual State of the Word address and/or here on WordPress News. This survey helps those who build WordPress understand more about how the software is used, and by whom. The survey also helps leaders in the WordPress open source project learn more about our contributors’ experience. To ensure that your WordPress experience is represented in the 2020 survey results, Take the 2020 Annual Survey! (English) You can also take the survey in French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish! The survey will be open for at least 6 weeks, and results will be posted on this blog. [...] The WordPress Professionals group consists of those who: work for a company that designs/develops websites; use WordPress to build websites and/or blogs for others; design or develop themes, plugins, or other custom tools for WordPress sites; or are a designer, developer, or other web professional working with WordPress. This WordPress Professionals group is further divided into WordPress Company Pros (those who work for a company that designs/develops websites) and WordPress Freelancers/Hobbyists (all other professional types) subgroups.

FreeBSD 12.2

  • FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE Announcement

    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE. This is the third release of the stable/12 branch.

  • October 2020

    27 October: FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE is now available. Please be sure to check the Release Notes and Release Errata before installation for any late-breaking news and/or issues with 12.2. More information about FreeBSD releases can be found on the Release Information page.

Also: This summer in KDE-FreeBSD | [bobulate]

Games: Stadia, Graveyard Keeper and Wildermyth

  • Stadia Pro for November has Sniper Elite 4, Risk of Rain 2, Republique and new releases | GamingOnLinux

    Google has announced the latest set of Stadia Pro games, along with new titles about to release like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice and Watch Dogs: Legion. PLUS news of Ubisoft+ coming to Stadia soon. What is Stadia? A quick primer for people not following: it's a game streaming service that uses Debian Linux under the hood along with the Vulkan graphics API. Playable on Linux in Chromium / Chrome browsers. You can either buy games, or subscribe to Stadia Pro to claim games each month (or do both).

  • Graveyard Keeper - Game Of Crone expansion is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Graveyard Keeper - Game Of Crone is an expansion to the medieval graveyard building and management sim that's like a morbid take on Stardew. This fresh expansion adds in another bunch of hours (6-12 they said approximately) to play through, along with a whole new story to follow where you help a bunch of escaped prisoners build up a camp. "You’ll have to help the escaped prisoners of the Inquisition survive in the wilderness by providing them with everything they need. To develop their camp to a fortified settlement while keeping in mind its benefits. To protect those who entrusted you with their lives, from the sword and fire. And also - to untangle the circumstances of the cruel game, which turned into the Great Blast and the return of the Ancient Curse."

  • Papercraft styled tactical-RPG 'Wildermyth' has a big new campaign out | GamingOnLinux

    Wildermyth is the character-driven, procedurally-generated tactical RPG with an art style resembling papercraft and it's brilliant. Now it's also bigger with a big campaign update out. In Wildermyth you play through various generated campaigns, each of which mixes things up like characters and events and so every play-through is different. You're supposed to see it as something resembling a classic tabletop RPG experience. Mixing together a party-based RPG with overworld exploration, random events and tactical turn-based combat there's a lot to love about it.

  • Godot Web export progress report #3

    Howdy Godotters! It's-a me! Fabio! It is time for an update on the Godot export for the Web. In the last few months, a lot has been going on regarding the Godot export for the Web. Most of the enhancements mentioned in the previous report have now been merged into the master branch, and backported to 3.2 (included in 3.2.4 beta 1). This sadly does not yet include the virtual keyboard support, since implementing it without impacting the experience on touchscreen-enabled devices that also have a physical keyboard has proven harder than expected. There is great news, though, on the other topic mentioned in that report, which is... GDNative support on HTML5 exports! Additionally, a new prototype version of the Godot Web Editor is now available for you to try out.