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Raspberry Pi 4 Gets 8GB RAM, Raspbian 64-bit (Beta)

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The Raspberry Pi 4 Model B was launched in June 2019 with Broadcom BCM2711 Arm Cortex-A72 processor coupled with either 1, 2, or 4GB LPDDR4 RAM.

But there were expectations that a Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB RAM or an 8GB eMMC flash may be eventually launched, as some of the user guides read “Product name: Raspberry Pi 4 Model B 1 GB, 2 GB, 4 GB + 8 GB variants”. We now know the answer as the Raspberry Pi Foundation has just introduced Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB RAM.

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8GB Raspberry Pi 4 released for $75 – Specifications

  • 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 released for $75 – Specifications

    Back in June 2019, the Raspberry PI 4 model was released, and it was an incredible update over the older model with up to 4GB ram. Today we see the long-rumored 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 released and priced at the just US $75. Here are the complete specs for an updated 64-bit credit card size Raspberry PI 4 8GB model with Linux desktop computer level of performance.

New Raspberry Pi 4: 8GB RAM model out now for $75

  • New Raspberry Pi 4: 8GB RAM model out now for $75 – plus you get a new 64-bit OS

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation has released an 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 that's available for $75 along with a beta of an official 64-bit operating system it's calling 'Raspberry Pi OS' instead of Raspbian.

    Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading and co-founder of The Raspberry Pi Foundation, says when the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B launched a year ago, the foundation had an 8GB variant in mind.

More of Raspberry Pi 4

  • Raspberry Pi 4 (8GB) Tested: Double the RAM, New 64-Bit OS

    From its launch in 2012 up until 2019, the Raspberry Pi wasn’t regarded as a serious PC replacement. Sure, you could play a few games, run office apps and surf the web with even the $5 Raspberry Pi Zero, but most people don’t want to do that with just 512MB or 1GB of RAM. When the Raspberry Pi 4 came out in June 2019, it changed the game by offering up to 4GB of RAM, more than enough for real multitasking and productivity.

    Now, Raspberry Pi Foundation has upped the ante by releasing a Raspberry Pi 4 B with a generous 8GB of RAM. Launching today for $75, the Raspberry Pi 4 B (8GB) is identical to other Raspberry Pi 4 B models in every way, except for its RAM capacity. So what do you do with all that memory, and is spending $20 more than the price of the $55, 4GB model worth it?

  • 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 Launched For $75 USD

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced a new Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB of RAM.

    The Raspberry Pi 4 2GB variant has dropped from $45 to $35 and now for complementing the existing 1GB / 2GB / 4GB models is an 8GB model. The rest of the RPi4 specs remain the same.

    The Raspberry Pi 4 8GB version is launching at $75 USD with immediate availability. The BCM2711 SoC employed by the Raspberry Pi 4 can address up o 16GB of LPDDR4 memory, but the delay in seeing an 8GB Raspberry Pi was until an 8GB LPDDR4 package could be sourced. The 8GB memory chip is being supplied by Micron.

You Can Now Buy a Raspberry Pi 4 Computer with 8GB RAM

  • You Can Now Buy a Raspberry Pi 4 Computer with 8GB RAM

    If you ever wanted to have more RAM on your tiny Raspberry Pi computer, now you can. The Raspberry Pi Foundation and Micron have partner up once again to bring you a Raspberry Pi 4 variant with no less than 8GB RAM.

    It appears that the lack of an 8GB RAM Raspberry Pi 4 offering was in fact the missing 8GB LPDDR4 package, as the BCM2711 chip that ships with the latest version of the popular single-board computer can handle up to 16GB LPDDR4 SDRAM.

Raspberry Pi 4 gains 8GB RAM version and 64-bit Raspberry Pi OS

  • Raspberry Pi 4 gains 8GB RAM version and 64-bit Raspberry Pi OS

    Raspberry Pi Ltd. has launched a version of the Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB DDR4 for $75. It also released a beta of Raspbian — now called Raspberry Pi OS — with a 64-bit architecture that can fully exploit the 8GB RAM.

    A new Raspberry Pi 4 Model B with 8GB of RAM has touched down for $75, making it the first under $200 Arm SBC we know of that provides 8GB entirely for the CPU, as opposed to sharing the RAM with a built-in NPU. The new model is joined by a new 64-bit version version of Raspbian to make the most of all that memory space. Like the 32-bit version, the 64-bit distro has a new name: Raspberry Pi OS. The news follows a beta firmware update last week for the RPi 4 that lets you boot from a USB device directly (see farther below).

  • The Raspberry Pi 4 is Now Available With 8GB RAM

    Here’s a slice of juicy news for single-board computing (SBC) fans amongst you: the Raspberry Pi 4 is now available with 8GB RAM.

    Yes, 8GB. That’s double the max memory that had, until now, been available.

    The Raspberry Pi 4 launched just under a year ago and is, to quote our own headline of the time, it’s a beast of a SBC. Now it boasts double the memory to play with the potential possibilities and capabilities provided just increased substantially.

The original

Raspberry PI 4 news: new 8GB board available

  • Raspberry PI 4 news: new 8GB board available

    In last days, Raspberry PI Foundation gave a great news for Raspberry PI lovers. After moving 2GB boards prices at same value of 1GB boards, a new board come to market. This new Raspberry PI 4 Model B ha 8GB memory!

    [...]

    Raspbian currently uses a 32-bit LPAE kernel and a 32-bit userland. This allows multiple processes to share all 8GB of memory, subject to the restriction that no single process can use more than 3GB. Usually this isn’t a big limitations, expecially for those programs managing multiple processes (for example Chromium). Sticking with a 32-bit userland has the benefit that the same image will run on every board from a 2011-era board to today’s ones.

    But power users, who want to be able to map all 8GB into the address space of a single process, need a 64-bit userland. Main options to do it currently foresee using a different OS (see also What Raspberry Pi OS to use article).

    However, Raspberry PI Foundation released an early beta of Raspbian 64-bit operating system image.

    Both our 32-bit and 64-bit operating system images have a new name: Raspberry Pi OS.

Raspberry Pi 4 8GB

  • Raspberry Pi 4 8GB

    Raspberry Pi 4 Wow, Raspberry Pi 4 is now available with 8GB of DDR4 memory! This is still a crazy good value for something that costs less than $100 ($75 for just the Raspberry Pi itself, actually) and runs modern operating systems with most of functionality you come to expect from a Linux desktop!

Raspberry Pi 4 (8GB) Tested

  • Raspberry Pi 4 (8GB) Tested: Double the RAM, New 64-Bit OS

    From its launch in 2012 up until 2019, the Raspberry Pi wasn’t regarded as a serious PC replacement. Sure, you could play a few games, run office apps and surf the web with even the $5 Raspberry Pi Zero, but most people don’t want to do that with just 512MB or 1GB of RAM. When the Raspberry Pi 4 came out in June 2019, it changed the game by offering up to 4GB of RAM, more than enough for real multitasking and productivity.

    Now, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has upped the ante by releasing a Raspberry Pi 4 B with a generous 8GB of RAM. Launching today for $75, the Raspberry Pi 4 B (8GB) is identical to other Raspberry Pi 4 B models in every way, except for its RAM capacity. So what do you do with all that memory, and is spending $20 more than the price of the $55 4GB model worth it?

    The short answer is that, right now, the 8GB capacity makes the most sense for users with very specialized needs: running data-intensive server loads or using virtual machines. As our tests show, it’s pretty difficult to use more than 4GB of RAM on Raspberry Pi, even if you’re a heavy multitasker.

8GB Raspberry Pi 4 on sale now at $75

Raspberry Pi 4 goes 8GB, plus new 64bit OS

  • Raspberry Pi 4 goes 8GB, plus new 64bit OS

    The highly versatile Raspberry Pi 4 now has a new 8GB model and their official Debian-based operating system has a new 64bit version for you to play with. From running retro games, to making it into a whole gaming device with a screen and everything, the Raspberry Pi is seriously cool and now thanks to the bigger RAM in the 8GB model it can do even more fun things for you.

    A model that was long rumoured but they had trouble doing it, until now. They said that while the BCM2711 chip used in the Raspberry Pi 4 actually supports up to 16GB of LPDDR4 SDRAM, the barrier was that lack of a 8GB LPDDR4 package which didn't exist but Micron stepped up with a suitable part for them.

    Some adjustments were made to accomodate it, as it needed higher peak currents. So the power supply components have been shuffled around, and a removal of a switch-mode power supply from the right side with a new switcher next to the USB-C power connection. It's available right now for $75.

You can now buy a Raspberry Pi 4 with as much RAM as a Mac mini

  • You can now buy a Raspberry Pi 4 with as much RAM as a Mac mini

    When the Raspberry Pi 4 launched last June, it delivered an impressive amount of computing power for such a tiny package. But if you still wanted more, Raspberry Pi heard you: Now you can buy a Pi 4 with a whopping 8GB of RAM, the same amount in a Mac mini that costs more than 10 times as much.

New Raspberry Pi OS update: First 8GB Pi 4

  • New Raspberry Pi OS update: First 8GB Pi 4, now you get these latest features

    Along with the release of the $75 Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB of memory, the Raspberry Foundation has updated its official operating system, Raspberry Pi OS, formerly known as Raspbian.

    The 32-bit version of Debian-based Raspberry Pi OS is gaining a new 'bookshelf' app that organizes editions of Raspberry Pi-related magazines and books from Raspberry Pi Press, such as the MagPi, HackSpace and Wireframe.

    The foundation has provided Raspbian as the official OS ever since the first batch of Arm-based single-board computers arrived in 2012, which featured just 512MB of RAM and a Broadcom chip that ran at 700MHz.

Raspberry Pi: Here's what's new in latest operating system

  • Raspberry Pi: Here's what's new in latest operating system update

    Last week, Raspberry Pi launched an 8GB version of its much-loved Raspberry Pi 4 board, alongside changes to the Linux-based operating system that sees Raspbian renamed Raspberry Pi OS. In addition to the name change, the company announced a 64-bit version of its desktop operating system, which seeks to take full advantage of what the new 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 has to offer.

    The 64-bit update remains in beta for the time being while the company irons out the usual kinks that accompany new software releases. In the meantime, Raspberry Pi has also updated the 32-bit version of its Raspberry Pi OS and published a brief overview of what has changed. Here are the highlights.

Raspberry unveils new 8GB Pi 4 and 64-bit OS

  • Raspberry unveils new 8GB Pi 4 and 64-bit OS

    The Pi 4 was released a year ago with options for 1GB, 2GB or 4GB RAM and the new version is nearly identical in structure. The one key change is the repositioning of power supply components in order to accommodate higher RAM demands.

    In making the long-awaited announcement of the upgrade, Pi officials gave a nod to its premature reference to the 8GB capacity in the Pi 4 instruction manual released last June.

    "While we launched with 1GB, 2GB and 4GB variants, even at that point we had our eye on the possibility of an 8GB Raspberry Pi 4," the Raspberry Pi blog reported last week. "We were so enthusiastic about the idea that the non-existent product made its way into both the Beginner's Guide and the compliance leaflet."

    The Raspberry Pi 4's BCM2711 chip was built to handle up to 16GB of RAM, but the requisite LPDDR4 SDRAM package that cold handle memory beyond 4GB was not available at the 2019 launch. Micron has since constructed the required part.

The Raspberry Pi 4 is Available With 8GB RAM

  • The Raspberry Pi 4 is Available With 8GB RAM

    The Raspberry Pi is a series of single-board computers developed with the main purpose of promoting computer science education in schools and developing countries. Its line of computers is designed with affordability, portability, and extensibility in mind – factors that have significantly contributed to its popularity and increasing use in major fields of computing including Robotics and IoT, to mention a few.

    If you’re familiar with the Raspberry Pi then you must be excited about today’s new because, after all the rumours, speculative moments, and feature requests, the 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 is finally available!

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