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Programming: LLVM, Julia, OCaml

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  • LLVM 11 Flips On NVIDIA CUDA Offloading From 64-Bit ARM

    The latest LLVM 11 development code has enabled support for NVIDIA CUDA GPU device offloading from 64-bit ARM.

    LLVM AArch64 has the build system support enabled for allowing CUDA offload from 64-bit ARM hosts. Up to now this wasn't enabled but it turns out it works and has been passing all of the OpenMP offload tests.

    The enablement for CUDA offloading on AArch64 was merged at the end of last week.

  • LLVM/Clang 10.0 Now Available With Better C++20 Support, New CPU Coverage

    The release cycle was dragged out an extra month due to bugs and there ended up even being a last minute sixth release candidate yesterday, but LLVM 10.0 and its sub-projects like Clang 10.0 and LLDB 10.0 were just tagged.

    LLVM 10 is now available as the latest half-year update to this extremely popular open-source compiler stack that spans many architectures, devices, and operating systems.

  • Programming language Julia: Version 1.4 is even faster and brings these new features

    Julia, a zippy programming language for data scientists and machine-learning experts, has been updated with improved multi-threading, new library features, and tweaks to the build system.

    The language has been embraced by some programmers for its C-like speed. Its makers aimed for it also to be as easy to use as Python, with the best qualities of R for statistics and Matlab for algebra.

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn OCaml

    Caml is a general-purpose, powerful, high-level programming language with a large emphasis on speed and efficiency. A dialect of the ML programming language, it supports functional, imperative, and object-oriented programming styles. Caml has been developed and distributed by INRIA, a French research institute, since 1985.

    The OCaml system is the main implementation of the Caml language. It has a very strong type-checking system, offers a powerful module system, automatic memory management, first-class functions, and adds a full-fledged object-oriented layer. OCaml includes a native-code compiler supporting numerous architectures, for high performance; a bytecode compiler, for increased portability; and an interactive loop, for experimentation and rapid development. OCaml’s integrated object system allows object-oriented programming without sacrificing the benefits of functional programming, parametric polymorphism, and type inference. The language is mature, producing efficient code and comes with a large set of general purpose as well as domain-specific libraries.

LLVM 10.0.0 released

  • LLVM 10.0.0 released
    I am pleased to announce that LLVM 10 is now available.
    
    Get it here: https://llvm.org/releases/download.html#10.0.0
    
    This release is the result of the LLVM community's work over the past
    six months (up to to e26a78e7085 on master plus commits up to
    d32170dbd5b on the release/10.x branch).
    
    Some highlights include:
    
    - C++ Concepts support in Clang
    - Clang no longer runs in a separate process by default ("in-process cc1")
    - Windows control flow guard (CFG) checks
    - Support for more processor cores and features
    
    And as usual, many bug fixes, optimizations, and new compiler diagnostics.
    
    For more details, see the release notes:
    
    https://llvm.org/releases/10.0.0/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
    https://llvm.org/releases/10.0.0/tools/clang/docs/Release...
    https://llvm.org/releases/10.0.0/tools/clang/tools/extra/...
    https://llvm.org/releases/10.0.0/tools/lld/docs/ReleaseNo...
    https://llvm.org/releases/10.0.0/tools/polly/docs/Release...
    https://llvm.org/releases/10.0.0/projects/libcxx/docs/Rel...
    
    Special thanks to the release testers and packagers: Alexandre Ganea,
    Andrew Kelley, Anil Mahmud, Bernhard Rosenkraenzer, Brian Cain,
    Dimitry Andric, Martijn Otto, Michael Kruse, Michał Górny, Neil
    Nelson, Rainer Orth, Serge Guelton, Sylvestre Ledru, Tobias Hieta, and
    Yvan Roux. Without your work, this release would not be possible.
    
    For questions or comments about the release, please contact the
    community on the mailing lists. Onwards to LLVM 11! And take care.
    
    Thanks,
    Hans
    _______________________________________________
    
  • LLVM 10.0.0 released

    Version 10.0.0 of the LLVM compiler suite is out. New features include support for C++ concepts, Windows control flow guard support, and much more; click below for pointers to a set of language-specific release notes.

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Games: Debian-Based SteamOS, Lutris 0.5.5 and Critters for Sale

  • SteamOS Isn’t Dead, Just Sidelined; Valve Has Plans To Go Back To Their Linux-Based OS

    It’s big news for any PC gamer that has been frustrated with Microsoft’s erroneous-laden grip on operating systems for as far back as 1995; with it comes a monumental blow to privacy, not to mention mere control of your PC; updates have a tendency to start when they want to, new OS licenses must be purchased if you change hardware configurations, and applications that Microsoft doesn’t want you using are notoriously finicky to get working. Of course, users can simply switch over to Linux if they have had their fill of Microsoft. That switch comes with a slew of changes, however, and dropping reliable applications is a part of the grieving process that must take place when attempting to switch over your OS. Linux does host a plethora of open-source tools that can take the place of past applications; GIMP in lieu of Photoshop, for example. Yet the old applications are never truly replaced 1 for 1; it’s more of a bandage than anything else. Even with WINE and other techniques developed over the years to help users with Linux use Windows software, there are plenty of pitfalls and inconveniences that stymie any attempts to maintain Linux over Windows.

  • Lutris 0.5.5 Linux Game Manager Adds Humble Bundle Support, Initial VKD3D Support

    Lutris 0.5.5 is out today as the newest version of this Linux game manager to assist in installing both native and emulated games on Linux. Lutris continues to expand the scope of its "runners" for improving the Linux gaming experience. While the version 0.5.5 number may not seem like a big deal, there is actually a lot to find with the Lutris 0.5.5 update. Among the changes with Lutris 0.5.5 are: - Initial support for Humble Bundle integration.

  • Try out 'Critters for Sale', an exhilarating short horror visual novel with two episodes out now

    The absolutely exhilarating short horror visual novel Critters for Sale, which was originally released the first day of 2019, had its second chapter ("Goat") available for some time (Jun 2019, actually). Considering how such a hidden gem it is I was going to write about it, but Liam ended up doing it first in this GOL article. [...] It still maintains the same fever-dream like visuals, game mechanics and layout, consisting on a left HUD with some key information, a central upper section where all the images and animations are displayed, along with some point and click elements, and finally a center lower section where you see the dialogues and options to advance the story in the available directions. However, regarding the premise, now it features other characters and a different setting, but since this is one of those games where the less you know the better, I will only say that although we're only grasping the surface of the whole mystery, and while the tone of the story still keeps a personal scope, at this point it's clear that those responsible for the plot's main threat not only have enough power to influence the entire world, but also directly encompass the whole history of mankind...

Linux Kernel: Linux 5.7, Linux Security and Intel Gen9 Graphics On Linux

  • AMD Sensor Fusion Hub Laptop Driver Unlikely To Land For Linux 5.7

    While we were hoping to see the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub driver introduced in Linux 5.7 for improving the AMD Ryzen Linux laptop experience, that now looks quite unlikely. This driver has been sought after by AMD Linux laptop customers since 2018 for supporting the accelerometer, gyroscopic sensors, and other functionality on modern AMD laptops, similar to the Intel Sensor Hub. Patches for the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub (AMD-SFH) driver for Linux were posted in January and underwent a few rounds of review.

  • Amazon Engineer's Patch For Flushing L1 Cache On Context Switching Revved

    Earlier this month there was the proposal by a Linux kernel engineer for Amazon to flush the L1 data cache on context switches as another safeguard against the ever increasing CPU vulnerabilities. The motivation for flushing the L1d cache on context switches is driven as a result of Intel's data sampling vulnerabilities and this safeguard would be an opt-in feature for those paranoid about system security. Flushing the L1 cache would ensure the data is not being snooped or leaked following a context switch but with all of the cache flushing could significantly hamper the system performance.

  • HDR Display Support Coming To Some Intel Gen9 Graphics On Linux

    For the very common Intel "Gen9" graphics found on pretty much all current pre-Icelake hardware that is available through retail channels, high dynamic range (HDR) display support could soon be enabled under Linux for a subset of devices.

Android Leftovers