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Development

Thanks to Linux, I just installed a pro-level video editor on my Chromebook

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Development
GNU
Linux
Gaming

We’re constantly looking around for new tricks to make our Chromebooks even more capable than they’ve already become over the past couple of years. Every day, there are fewer use-cases where a Windows or Mac device is a necessity and we truly believe that Chrome OS will eventually offer comparable alternatives to that narrowing space. If there is one product, in particular, that Chrome OS will need to figure out, it’s video editing. Sure, there are great online products like WeVideo for lightweight projects and you can even find some pretty good video editing platforms in the Google Play Store but what we’re talking about is serious, high-octane editing that’s worthy of a Hollywood studio. (Well, a low-budget studio maybe.)

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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Hover a mouse over a link - just don't trust the results

    This appears to be a link to a good website. When the mouse hovers over this link, it will appear that it goes to www.somegoodplace.com. Click it. I dare you Smile

    The link really goes to guce.advertising.com. JavaScript is used to dynamically change the link just as it is clicked. Pretty cool, eh?

  • Goodbye Joyent

    But as any software veteran knows, projects often don’t survive the whims of management. No one is fired for picking Linux (these days), but they might be for picking something else. I already experienced this once before, as a core developer of the Riak database. We were rigorous, paying homage to the theoretics of distributed systems, but with a focus on bringing that theory to the masses. So much so that our last CEO said we had to stop doing so much “computer science”. He meant it as an insult, but we wore it as a badge of honor. But hey, MongoDB had a sweet API and BJSON, who cares if it lost your data occasionally [1]. I understand that people like to stick with what is popular. I respect that decision — it is theirs to make. But I’ll never be a part of that crowd. I want to use software that speaks to me, software that solves the problems I have, software guided by similar values to my own. For me, no project does this more than SmartOS and the illumos kernel. It is my Shawshank Redemption in a sea of MCU.

  • Continuous integration with GDB Buildbot

    Continuous integration is a hot topic these days, and the GNU Project Debugger is keeping up with the trend. Who better to serve as a role model for tracking and exterminating bugs than a debugger?

    The GDB Buildbot started as a pet project back in 2014 but is now an integral part of the development process. It provides an infrastructure to test new commits pushed to the official repository, as well as a service (which we call try builds) for developers to submit their proposed changes. In this article, I share the story of our Buildbot instance, where we are right now in terms of functionality, and the plans (and challenges) for the future.

    [...]

    Back in 2014, the GDB project did not have a continuous integration tool. Developers kindly provided testsuite results and reported regressions in the code, often using their own machines. However, these developers had limited resources and could not test various architectures simultaneously. Compilation failures were often not caught in systems that are not widely used. Ultimately, this issue caused delays and annoyances during the release process (or in the worst cases) after GDB was released.

    In an attempt to mitigate this problem, the GDB Buildbot was set up. Only GNU/Linux running on Intel/AMD 32 and 64-bit was supported at the beginning, but the community quickly started to contribute toward support other machines and architectures. The initial setup compiled and tested the code using common configure flags, but developers still needed to consult the web page in order to know the results.

    Over time, the instance has been improved and new features were added, including email notifications whenever a commit introduced a compilation failure, and email notifications to the gdb-testers mailing list containing the results of each testsuite run.

    Perhaps one of the most useful features was the try build system.

  • Automating unit tests in test-driven development

    DevOps is a software engineering discipline focused on minimizing the lead time to achieve a desired business impact. While business stakeholders and sponsors have ideas on how to optimize business operations, those ideas need to be validated in the field. This means business automation (i.e., software products) must be placed in front of end users and paying customers. Only then will the business confirm whether the initial idea for improvement was fruitful or not.

    Software engineering is a budding discipline, and it can get difficult to ship products that are defect-free. For that reason, DevOps resorts to maximizing automation. Any repeatable chore, such as testing implemented changes to the source code, should be automated by DevOps engineers.

    This article looks at how to automate unit tests. These tests are focused on what I like to call "programming in the small." Much more important test automation (the so-called "programming in the large") must use a different discipline—integration testing. But that's a topic for another article.

  • Create web user interfaces with Qt WebAssembly instead of JavaScript

    When I first heard about WebAssembly and the possibility of creating web user interfaces with Qt, just like I would in ordinary C++, I decided to take a deeper look at the technology.

    My open source project Pythonic is completely Python-based (PyQt), and I use C++ at work; therefore, this minimal, straightforward WebAssembly tutorial uses Python on the backend and C++ Qt WebAssembly for the frontend. It is aimed at programmers who, like me, are not familiar with web development.

  • GCC 8.4 Status Report (2020-02-17)
    Status
    ======
    
    
    
    
    It has been almost a year since GCC 8.3 has been released and GCC 8.4
    release should have been released already, so we should concentrate on
    getting it out soon.  Unfortunately we have two P1s, one of them is
    waiting for reporter's input, so we might as well just ignore it unless
    the input is provided, but the other, C++ FE one, looks something that
    should be fixed.  If we get rid of the P1s, I'd like to create
    8.4-rc1 on Wednesday, Feb 26th and release 8.4 the week afterwards.
    If you have any queued backports, please commit them to 8 branch
    (and 9 branch too, we'd like to release 9.3 soon too).
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    Quality Data
    ============
    
    
    
    
    Priority          #   Change from last report
    --------        ---   -----------------------
    P1                2   +   2
    P2              284   +  75
    P3               38   +   4
    P4              151   -  11
    P5               22   -   2
    --------        ---   -----------------------
    Total P1-P3     324   +  81
    Total           497   +  68
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    Previous Report
    ===============
    
    
    
    
    https://gcc.gnu.org/ml/gcc/2019-02/msg00122.html
    
  • GCC 8.4 + GCC 9.3 Compilers Coming Soon

    GCC 8.4 is already past due for release while Red Hat's Jakub Jelinek is trying to get its release organized in the coming weeks along with GCC 9.3. It's been nearly one year since GCC 8.3 and thus many fixes in tow for GCC 8.4. But two "P1" regressions of the highest priority are left to be addressed or demoted before the 8.4 release can happen. Jakub is hoping to create a release candidate of GCC 8.4 on 26 February and to then officially release the GCC 8.4 stable compiler the first week of March. A similar GCC 9.3 release is also expected soon for those on this current GCC 9 stable series. 

Python Programming

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Development
  • Refactoring and asking for forgiveness

    Recently, I had a great interaction with one of my coworkers that I think is worth sharing, with the hope you may learn a bit about refactoring and python.

    My colleague came to me to help him think through a problem that surfaced with a change to a project. The code in question sends a file to a remote storage service.

  • A Guide to the Newer Python String Format Techniques

    In the previous tutorial in this introductory series, you learned how to format string data using the string modulo operator. The string modulo operator is useful, and it’s good for you to be familiar with it because you’re likely to encounter it in older Python code. However, there are two newer ways that you can use Python to format strings that are arguably more preferable.

  • Python 101 2nd Edition Kickstarter is Live!

    I am excited to announce that my newest book, Python 101, 2nd Edition is launching on Kickstarter today!

  • February PyLadies Pune workshop

    It was the time for “learning Python with harware” in February, 2020 with PyLadies in Pune. Coding in Python becomes fun when one can see the changes it makes in the hardware.

    Selecting a place for work is always a difficult task as any organizer. College Of Engineering Pune (COEP) has always been supportive of PyLadies Pune. When I approached Abhijit for the venue he readily agreed. My sincere gratitude to him, Women Engineers Group and the FOSSMeet Pune team enough for that.

    Once I reached the venue it was already a full house and still people were coming in. We had more than 55 students of 1st to 3rd year, attending the workshop. The first year students already knew Python. Around 12-14 people were writing Python for the first time.

    The workshop started with the very basics of the language on the terminal.

    [...]

    We started with blinking the first LED of the board. When the students lit their first LED the smile and light in their eyes were precious Smile. Following that we spend some time with the simple codes. We tried our hands on different modules of Circuit Python. We took the help from the tutorial provided in Adafruit website. The students were enjoying and indulged into creativity. So I decided to give them problem statements instead of showing them code. I was happy to see how fast they were solving it and experimenting with different patterns, colours.

  • PyDev of the Week: Martin Fitzpatrick

    This week we welcome Martin Fitzpatrick (@mfitzp) as our PyDev of the Week! Martin is the author of “Create Simple GUI Applications with Python and Qt 5” and the creator of the LearnPyQt website. You can also check out his personal site or see what he’s up to by visiting his Github profile. Let’s spend some time getting to know Martin better!

Programming: Gitea, NBD, Eclipse, Electron, Perl and Spyder (Python)

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Development
  • Gitea 1.11.0: Open source self-hosting Git solution gets a new update

    Gitea helps you set up your own self-hosted Git service with the use of lightweight Go code. The latest version, 1.11.0, includes a long list of updates, bug fixes, and improvements, including changing the markdown rendering to goldmark, and a new contrib command. Is self-hosting the right solution for you? See how Gitea compares to other Git hosting solutions.

  • NBD: A popular HTTP-fetching npm code library used by 48,000 other modules retires, no more updates coming

    After eleven months of planning, the npm-distributed request module has been deprecated, meaning the popular JavaScript code library for making HTTP requests is no longer supported and won't receive further updates.

    The almost 48,000 other npm modules that include request as a dependency won't see any immediate effect, other than a deprecation warning from the npm command line client. But the maintainers of those modules should consider revising their code so it uses an alternative library for handling HTTP interactions.

    Request, now at version 2.88.2 and still downloaded almost 17m times a week, was created in 2009 by Mikeal Rogers, who presently handles community operations at open source biz Protocol Labs.

  • Still Increasing the Power of Hybrid IT Through Open Source

    Broadcom (perhaps still better known as CA) used this year’s Arcati Mainframe Yearbook to highlight the mainframe development revolution and the growth in open source tools.

    They said that tools, like the green screens of ISPF and the Eclipse desktop IDE, enhanced with proprietary plugins have served mainframe application developers well over the years. However, there are changes in the larger world of development that are creating the conditions for a revolution in mainframe tooling.

  • Tangle EE project joins Eclipse Foundation to bring distributed ledger apps to enterprise

    As the number of IoT devices proliferate, and machines conduct transactions with machines without humans involved, it becomes increasingly necessary to have a permissionless system that facilitates this kind of communication in a secure way.

    Enter the IOTA Foundation, a Berlin-based open-source distributed ledger technology (DLT) project, which has hooked up with the Eclipse Foundation to bring IOTA DLT to the enterprise via the Tangle EE project. For starters, this involves forming a working group.

  • Eclipse Partners with IOTA on Open Source Distributed Ledger Tech
  • What to know about software development security — why it’s still so hard and how to tackle it

    The right software security practices can prevent many future security problems, and there is an increasingly realisation that software development security needs a cradle-to-grave approach, not just focusing on solving problems once they become apparent.

    There is still a long way to go and no-one can claim this is easy to address: the increasing complexity of modern software development environments, not to mention the sheer volume of code and other digital assets being created, often in continuous, fast-paced environments, exacerbates the challenge.

    [...]

    Coding standards are particularly relevant for some of the more complex programming languages — C++ in particular — which while introducing unprecedented scope for innovation and flexibility, also allow for more interpretation, which can lead even the most skilled developer to inadvertently introduce an error. Again, automation is key, especially for huge codebases and complicated embedded software projects, so static code analysis is increasingly introduced to reduce manual effort and associated risks.

  • Electron 8 - First Release As OpenJS Foundation Incubator

    At the end of last year Electron joined the OpenJS Foundation as an incubator project. The release of Electron 8, less than two months later, is an indication that it is thriving in its new home.

    Initially developed for GitHub's Atom editor, Electron is a cross-platform desktop application development tool based on Node.js and Chromium enabling apps to be packaged for Mac, Windows, and Linux. Both Atom and Electron were open sourced in 2014.

    News that Electron was joining the OpenJS Foundation was announced in December 2019 at the Node+JS Interactive conference held in Montreal.

  • Modularity for Maintenance

    One of the best things about maintaining open source in the modern era is that there are so many wonderful, free tools to let machines take care of the busy-work associated with collaboration, code-hosting, continuous integration, code quality maintenance, and so on.

    [...]

    But... let’s say you1 maintain a few dozen Python projects. Being a good maintainer, you’ve started splitting up your big monolithic packages into smaller ones, so your utility modules can be commonly shared as widely as possible rather than re-implemented once for each big frameworks. This is great!

    However, every one of those numbered list items above is now a task per project that you have to repeat from scratch. So imagine a matrix with all of those down one side and dozens of projects across the top - the full Cartesian product of these little administrative tasks is a tedious and exhausting pile of work.

    If you’re lucky enough to start every project close to perfect already, you can skip some of this work, but that partially just front-loads the tedium; plus, projects tend to start quite simple, then gradually escalate in complexity, so it’s helpful to be able to apply these incremental improvements one at a time, as your project gets bigger.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 47: Roman Calculator and Gapful Numbers

    These are some answers to the Week 47 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

    Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a couple of days (February 9, 2020). This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

    I have really very little time to complete this blog post in time for the deadline. My explanations will be minimal, sorry about that.

  • The Spyder Development Community and Quansight Labs Announce the Release of Spyder 4

    The Spyder Project and Quansight Labs announced the release of Spyder 4, the latest version of the most popular open source Scientific Python development environment. Spyder 4 boasts new features that users have been eagerly awaiting.

    Spyder 4 provides users an enhanced coding experience like general purpose editors and IDEs, while strengthening its specialized focus on scientific programming in Python. 

Java and Python Programming

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Development
  • How To Solve Error: “No Main Class Found in NetBeans”
  • A review of Processing books

    Processing is the free and open Java development environment that targets artists who are intrigued by generative code. In essence it is the Java language with a friendly development interface and built-in libraries to get you started.

    There are plenty of ways to learn Processing, including the tutorials on the organisation's website, and the built-in examples that come with the distribution. But if you prefer a printed book, keep reading. This article will review nine available publications, so you can make an informed purchase decision.

    For the sake of completeness I will also append information on two books I haven't had a chance to read.

  • The Digital Cat: Dissecting a Web stack

    Having recently worked with young web developers who were exposed for the first time to proper production infrastructure, I received many questions about the various components that one can find in the architecture of a "Web service". These questions clearly expressed the confusion (and sometimes the frustration) of developers who understand how to create endpoints in a high-level language such as Node.js or Python, but were never introduced to the complexity of what happens between the user's browser and their framework of choice. Most of the times they don't know why the framework itself is there in the first place.

    The challenge is clear if we just list (in random order), some of the words we use when we discuss (Python) Web development: HTTP, cookies, web server, Websockets, FTP, multi-threaded, reverse proxy, Django, nginx, static files, POST, certificates, framework, Flask, SSL, GET, WSGI, session management, TLS, load balancing, Apache.

    In this post, I want to review all the words mentioned above (and a couple more) trying to build a production-ready web service from the ground up. I hope this might help young developers to get the whole picture and to make sense of these "obscure" names that senior developers like me tend to drop in everyday conversations (sometimes arguably out of turn).

  • Restoring intuition over multi-dimensional space

    We would not be human if we did not curse things. As beings that are confined in a three-dimensional world, we tend to blame space whenever we have a problem to visualize data that extend to more than three dimensions. From scientific books and journal papers to simple blog articles and comments the term: “curse of dimensionality” is being repeated like a mantra, almost convincing us that any object, whose nature extends to something more than just “3D” is out of reach to our brains.

    This article is going to discuss neither data visualization nor seek to conform to the common opinion that highly-dimensional space is incomprehensible.

    Quite opposite: the highly-dimensional space is not incomprehensible. It is just weird and less intuitive. Fortunately, take advantage of some mathematical tools and use them as a “free ticket” to gain more intuition. More precisely, we will present three “routes” we can use to get a better feeling on how things play out in “ND space.”

    [...]

    In this article, we have looked into three aspects of the multidimensionality of space. As we couldn’t visualize it (we didn’t even try…), we took advantage of some mathematical mechanisms to gain a bit more insight into the strange behavior of this world. Although not backed with any ultimate proofs, we hope that the mathematical reasoning just presented can spark some inspiration, intuition, and imagination, which is something that is often needed when having to cope with N-dimensions.

  • Airflow By Example

    Apache Airflow is a very interesting, popular and free tool to create, manage and monitor workflows, for example if you want to do ETL (Extract / Transform / Load) on data.

    This sort of enterprise software often may seem complicated or overly unrelated to our everyday experience as developers but ... is it, really? How about if I just want to watch some TV shows? And experiment with some enterprise-level software at the same time?

    Let's do that by learning how to use Airflow to watch TV.

Programming: Wind River's CI/CD, Mint, Python and Java

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Development
  • Wind River Launches CD Platform for Embedded Systems

    Glenn Seiler, vice president for open source strategy for Wind River, said the CD platform is based on an open source instance of the Jenkins continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) platform. The company envisions organizations downloading the platform as source code that Wind River will update regularly for use on top of the Wind River Linux platform, he said.

    Wind River is taking advantage of containers, Kubernetes, the Puppet IT automation framework and a repository to ease deployment of its CD platform, added Seiler. The company is committed to providing updates to that platform, which Wind River uses internally, at least every three weeks, said Seiler.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Mint

    Mint is a programming language for the front-end web that aims to solve the common issues of Single Page Applications (SPAs) at a language level.

     It is a compiler and a framework combined to provide great developer experience while allowing users to write safe, readable and maintainable code, according to the developers behind the project.

    The common issues that it attempts to fix are regard reusable components, styling routing, global and local state handling, and synchronous and asynchronous computations that might fail.

    “It was born out of the frustration of the JavaScript language and ecosystem (NPM) and the Elm language and it’s not so open development practices,” Mint said on its website. “Mint aims to combine the developer experience of Elm and the expressiveness of React to create the perfect language for building single-page applications.”

  • PyPy and CFFI have moved to Heptapod

    It has been a very busy month, not so much because of deep changes in the JIT of PyPy but more around the development, deployment, and packaging of the project.

  • Your Guide to Reading Excel (xlsx) Files in Python

    In this brief Python tutorial, we are going to learn how to read Excel (xlsx) files using Python. Specifically, we will read xlsx files in Python using the Python module openpyxl. First, we start by the simplest example of reading a xlsx file in Python. Second, we will learn how to read multiple Excel files using Python.

  • CausalNex: An open-source Python library that helps data scientists to infer causation rather than observing correlation

    CausalNex is a Python library that allows data scientists and domain experts to co-develop models that go beyond correlation and consider causal relationships. ‘CasualNex’ provides a practical ‘what if’ library which is deployed to test scenarios using Bayesian Networks (BNs).

  • Programming languages: Java developers flock to Kotlin and ditch Oracle JDK for OpenJDK [Ed: CBS tabloid ZDNet does puff pieces for Snyk now. A Microsoft-connected attack dog -- one  which badmouths FOSS and now pretends to have a 'study' (self-promotion stunt) on programming trends...]

    The vast majority of developers who use a JVM (Java Virtual Machine) language still use Java, but a sizable chunk of the population is shifting to Kotlin, a JVM-compatible language developed by JetBrains, which Google is encouraging developers to use for Android development.  

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • The 15 Best Vim Plugins for Programmers and Developers in 2020

    Now, before we dive into the most used and popular Vim plugins, let us first understand what Vim really is. Basically, Vim is just another text editor that we can use to write and edit the text just like Sublime Text, which we commonly use for Windows or Mac, or even Notepad that we use for Windows. Vim allows efficient text editing and it is sometimes even considered as an entire IDE for programmers. Editing existing code for software engineers become very time consuming and mundane. Since Vim is all about efficiency, it allows us to handle repetitive tasks using existing keyboard shortcuts or even customize and create our own.

  • RISC OS Seeing SDL2 Support Brought Up

    A few weeks ago was RISC OS CPU feature detection merged to SDL2 (and also SDL 1.2) while being merged this week was basic support for compiling on RISC OS and support for creating windows on RISC OS when the SDL no frame flag is set. This RISC OS + SDL support is being worked on by Cameron Cawley who has worked on other RISC OS software support from ScummVM to different open-source tools.

  • C++20 Being Wrapped Up, C++23 In Planning

    An ISO C++ Committee meeting just wrapped up in Prague and it was voted to send the draft international standard for C++ out for final approval and publication.

    This means that C++20 is now effectively complete and will be formally published in a few months. Prior to firming up C++20, they improved the context-sensitive recognition of module/import, added new rangified algorithms, added ranges::ssize, and resolved other issues.

  • 25 years of Delphi and no Oracle in sight: Not a Visual Basic killer but hard to kill

    On this day 25 years ago, Borland Software trotted out version 1.0 of the Delphi application development product, making the announcement at the Software Development '95 event in San Francisco.

    That year, the current version of Windows was 3.11 (or NT 3.5), with Windows 95 in beta. There was high demand for custom business applications and developers had plenty of tools to choose from: Microsoft Visual C++ 1.52 for 16-bit applications, Visual C++ 2.0 for 32-bit, Borland's Pascal or C++, various database-oriented tools like PowerBuilder or Microsoft Access, and many more.

  • Python 3.7.5 : The httpx python package.

    Today I will present a new python packet that can help you in developing web applications.
    This is the next generation HTTP client for Python and is named httpx.
    This python package comes with a nice logo: a butterfly.
    The official webpage can be found at this webpage.
    The development team come with this intro:
    HTTPX is a fully featured HTTP client for Python 3, which provides sync and async APIs, and support for both HTTP/1.1 and HTTP/2.
    I install it on my Fedora 31 distro with the pip3 tool.

GNU: GnuCash, GNU World Order and GNU Compiler Collection (GCC)

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Development
GNU
  • GnuCash : free and open-source accounting app for Linux

    Are you looking for an accounting app for your business? If you do, try out GnuCash, an open-source, free-to-use financing platform for Linux. It is the ideal solution for small businesses. Nevertheless, you can also use it for your personal use.

    In this article, we will take a closer look at GnuCash, its installation, and what it has to offer.

  • GNU World Order 340

    Thoughts about licensing. Coffee. Then thoughts about Java.

  • GCC 10 Adds Late Support For -std=c++20 To Target C++20

    With C++20 now effectively complete, GCC developers have made a rather late change for GCC 10 that is also long overdue and that is introducing the -std=c++20 switch for targeting C++20. 

    The GNU Compiler Collection has been working on C++20 support for a while and has much of it ironed out. But up until now -std=c++2a had to be used for specifying this support that was pretty much a given C++2A would be called C++20. With this C++ revision going to publication in the next few months, it will surely be known as C++20 in making it out before the end of the calendar year. 

Python Programming

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Development

Programming: Outreachy, PHP, and Python

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Development
  • Anisa Kuci: Outreachy post 4 - Career opportunities

    As mentioned in my last blog posts, Outreachy is very interesting and I got to learn a lot already. Two months have already passed by quickly and there is still one month left for me to continue working and learning.

    As I imagine all the other interns are thinking now, I am also thinking about what is going to be the next step for me. After such an interesting experience as this internship, thinking about the next steps is not that simple.

    I have been contributing to Free Software projects for quite some years now. I have been part of the only FLOSS community in my country for many years and I grew up together with the community, advocating free software in and around Albania.

    I have contributed to many projects, including Mozilla, OpenStreetMap, Debian, GNOME, Wikimedia projects etc. So, I am sure, the FLOSS world is definitely the right place for me to be. I have helped communities grow and I am very enthusiastic about it.

  • PHP 7.4 Slated To Land In Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    PHP 7.4 should be landing in the Ubuntu 20.04 archive in the next week or so.

    PHP 7.4 was released at the end of November with some really great features. Ubuntu developers now feel comfortable enough with PHP 7.4 that they intend to land it for the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release, which also pans out well since that provides them with an extra year of upstream support compared to shipping PHP 7.3.

    PHP 7.4 brings the interesting FFI for accessing C structures / functions / variables from native PHP code, Opcache preload, more performance improvements, support for typed properties, and much more... It's quite a hefty annual update to PHP7 and I'm quite glad that it is indeed set to be bundled for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • PHP Development on Fedora with Eclipse
  • How to Get the Column Names from a Pandas Dataframe – Print and List

    The post How to Get the Column Names from a Pandas Dataframe – Print and List appeared first on Erik Marsja.

    In this short post, we will learn 6 methods to get the column names from Pandas dataframe. One of the nice things about Pandas dataframes is that each column will have a name (i.e., the variables in the dataset). Now, we can use these names to access specific columns by name without having to know which column number it is.

    To access the names of a Pandas dataframe, we can the method columns(). For example, if our dataframe is called df we just type print(df.columns) to get all the columns of the pandas dataframe.

  • PyCharm 2020.1 EAP 3

    We have a new Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm that can be now downloaded from our website.

    We have concentrated on fixing the issues that needed to be fixed and making lots of improvements so the final PyCharm 2020.1 will be everything you hoped for. Here is a rundown of some of the things you can expect from this build.

  • Python Basics: How To Print in Python?

    It’s quite common to make mistakes when you try to print something using Python considering you’re new to Python scripting.

    No matter what program you write, you will always be needing to print something or the other (most of the time).

    So, in this article, I’ll be explaining how to print something in Python and list out some common mistakes that you can avoid.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora and Red Hat: Test Day This Thursday, Report on State of Enterprise Open Source 2020 and More

  • Fedora 32 Gnome 3.36 Test Day 2020-02-20

    Thursday, 2020-02-20 is the Fedora 32 Gnome Test Day! As part of changes Gnome 3.36 in Fedora 32, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • The State of Enterprise Open Source 2020: Enterprise open source use rises, proprietary software declines

    Last year we set out to determine how IT leaders think about open source, why they choose it and what they intend to do with it in the future. The result was The 2019 State of Enterprise Open Source: A Red Hat Report, and the findings were clear and confirmed what we see happening in the industry. Enterprise open source has become a default choice of IT departments around the world and organizations are using open source in categories that have historically been more associated with proprietary technology. Headed into the second year of the survey, we had a new directive in mind. We wanted to dive deeper into how IT leaders’ intentions and usage have changed. We surveyed 950 IT leaders in four regions. Respondents had to have some familiarity with enterprise open source and have at least 1% Linux installed at their organization. Respondents were not necessarily Red Hat customers and were unaware that Red Hat was the sponsor of this survey. This allowed us to get a more honest and broad view of the true state of enterprise open source.

  • Manage application programming interfaces to drive new revenue for service providers

    Telecommunications service providers have valuable assets that can be exposed, secured, and monetized via API-centric agile integration. They can derive additional value from new assets, developed internally or through partners and third parties and integrated in a similar way with OSS and BSS systems. Service providers can open new revenue paths if they enhance the value they deliver to customers and to their partner- and developer-ecosystems. APIs can help them accomplish this goal. Services that providers can potentially offer with APIs include direct carrier billing, mobile health services, augmented reality, geofencing, IoT applications, and more. Mobile connectivity, for example, is key to powering IoT applications and devices, giving service providers an inside track to provide APIs to access network information for IoT services. In mobile health, APIs can serve as the link between the customer and healthcare partners through the user’s smartphone. Embracing this API-centric approach, service providers can realize increased agility by treating OSS/BSS building blocks as components that can be reused again and again. They may also innovate faster by giving partners controlled access to data and services, expand their ecosystem by improving partner and third-party collaboration, and generate more revenue through new direct and indirect channels.

today's howtos

  • Autostart Tmux Session On Remote System When Logging In Via SSH

    It is always a good practice to run a long running process inside a Tmux session when working with remote systems via SSH. Because, it prevents you from losing the control of the running process when the network connection suddenly drops. Just in case the network connection gets dropped for any reason, the processes inside the Tmux session will keep running on the remote systems, so you can re-attach to the Tmux session using “tmux attach” command once the network connection is back online. What if you forgot to start the Tmux session in the first place? No matter how careful you’re, sometimes you may forget to start Tmux session. Here is a simple way to avoid this problem. You can autostart Tmux session on the remote systems when logging via SSH. This is especially helpful if you lost the network connection when upgrading a remote Linux server via SSH from your local system.

  • Setup Static IP on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Desktop and Server Operating System

    In this article, I am going to show you how to configure a static IP on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS server and desktop operating systems. So, let’s get started.

  • Amiga floppy recovery project scope

    The main goal of my Amiga project is to read the data from my old floppy disks. After a bit of hiatus (and after some gentle encouragement from friends at FOSDEM) I'm nearly done, 150/200 disks attempted so far. Ultimately I intend to get rid of the disks to free up space in my house, and probably the Amiga, too. In the meantime, what could I do with it?

  • Part 1: How to Enable Hardware Accelerators on OpenShift

    Managing hardware accelerator cards like GPUs or high-performance NICs in Kubernetes is hard. The special payload (driver, device-plugin, monitoring stack deployment and advanced feature discovery), updates and upgrades, are tedious and error-prone tasks, and often third-party vendor knowledge is needed to accomplish these steps. The Special Resource Operator (SRO) is a template for exposing and managing accelerator cards in a Kubernetes cluster. It handles the hardware seamlessly from bootstrapping to update and upgrades fully managed. The first part will describe the SRO in general where the second part will describe the building blocks in SRO and how to enable a different hardware accelerator step by step.

  • Everthing you need to know about tmux – Windows

    What are tmux Windows? tmux window is the entity that holds panes and resides within the tmux session. Think of a window in tmux as a tab in your notebook. Tabs (windows) help organize your work and group your individual pages (panes) based on some topic of your choice. By default, when tmux starts, a session is initialized. Within this session, tmux initializes a single window (by default) which occupies the entire area of the terminal. This window will contain one single pane (by default).

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: MX Linux 19.1 Run Through, Late Night Linux, Linux Headlines and More

  • MX Linux 19.1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at MX Linux 19.1.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 83

    Joe has been playing with a PinePhone for a week and gives an honest appraisal. Plus Will’s simple solution to his Mac woes, switching to Linux and a community crowdfunder in the news, and a packed KDE Korner.

  • 2020-02-17 | Linux Headlines

    Two separate VPN companies have recently open-sourced client software, and updates to some beloved projects.

  • Change Desktop Environments on Linux

    Let's go over what it takes to switch your desktop on Linux change it from KDE, GNOME, XFCE, MATE, Cinnamon, LXQt, etc.

Second Shortwave Beta

Today I can finally announce the second Shortwave Beta release! I planned to release it earlier, but unfortunately the last few weeks were a bit busy for me. Read more