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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • C Programming Language - Introduction

    This tutorial is the first part of a C programming language course on Linux. C is a procedural programming language that was designed by American computer scientist Dennis Ritchie. Please note that we'll be using Linux for all our examples and explanation. Specifically, we'll be using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

  • DSF 2019 Board Election Results

    I'm pleased to announce the winners of our 2019 DSF Board of Directors election.

    [...]

    This year we had 17 great candidates and while not everyone can get elected each year I hope they all consider running again in the 2020 election.

    Another item of note with this election is that our Board is now comprised of two thirds women, which is a first for the DSF.

  • coloured shell prompt
  • Create multiple threads to delete multiple files with python

Programming Leftovers

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Development

Git v2.20.0

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Development
OSS

The latest feature release Git v2.20.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 962 non-merge commits since v2.19.0 (this is by far the largest release in v2.x.x series), contributed by 83 people, 26 of which are new faces.

Read more

Also: Git 2.20 Brings Many Fixes, Updates To Windows Port

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Compare and delete files with the same content with python

    Welcome back to this new chapter of the delete duplicate application project, in the previous chapter this python program has successfully deleted the duplicate files inside the nested folders, however it has not really delete the file with the same content but instead just deletes the duplicate file with the same name as the selected one. Thus in this chapter we are going one step further to only delete the file with the same content and leave the one with the same name alone. First of all we will include the full path to the file which we have selected as the forth parameter when we create a new remove thread instance.

  • Python Django JWT — djangorestframework-jwt Example

    Adding JWT authentication in Python and Django is quite easy thanks to some mature libraries and packages like Django REST framework, djangorestframework-jwt and django-rest-framework-simplejwt.

  • It was twenty years ago …

    For the next few years I assisted Doug here and there, and then formally took over in late 2001.

    It’s been a really good and rewarding experience, and I hope to be able to help with this for a few more years to come.

  • Using LSTMs to join words (Portmanteaus): Part 1
  • Using LSTMs to join words (Portmanteaus): Part 2

Programming With Python and Node.js in GNU/Linux

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Development

Need a Linux Distro for Deep Learning Applications? Try Ubuntu

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Development
Ubuntu

If your target market is finance, healthcare, or manufacturing, you know AI, ML, and DL solutions in demand for use cases ranging from fraud detection and cancer screenings to industrial automation. There are also interest and backing for applications including language translation, chatbots and service bots, facial recognition, and self-driving cars. A major challenge that the developer has to overcome with these applications, however, is dealing with massive quantities of unstructured data including image, voice, and sound.

NVIDIA CUDA, which enables general computing on graphical processing units (GPUs), allow developers to increase the speed of their applications. You can use these graphics cards to Ubuntu with traditional PCI slots on motherboards or with external Thunderbolt adapters. In fact, NVIDIA’s DGX Systems for deep learning run on Ubuntu.

Canonical, which produces Ubuntu with the help of its community, has also worked with Google to develop Kubeflow, which simplifies the process of installing AI tools and framework, as well as making it easier to use GPUs.

In addition, Ubuntu’s extensive libraries, tutorials and examples related to AI, ML, and DL make it the preferred OS choice for these applications. Ubuntu is also known for the support it offers for the most recent versions of free open source platforms and software.

Read more

Also: Fresh Snaps from November 2018

Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • The Case for Data-Driven Open Source Development

    Every year the number of Open Source companies and developer communities continues to grow. Open Source is becoming the de facto standard for software development as companies realize the cost, agility and innovation benefits. In addition to embracing Linux, Microsoft recently open sourced its entire patent portfolio to all member of the Open Invention Network. Companies are not only hiring engineers based on their Open Source Software (OSS) knowledge but also allocating 100 percent of their time to external projects. As a result, these projects quality and feature sets improve significantly which further accelerates their adoption in the enterprise. Very successful Open Source projects such as Kubernetes have helped define best practices for contributions (both technical and non-technical), communication (both online and offline), openness (Summits, Special Interest Groups, etc.) and governance (maintainer-ship, Technical Advisory Board, etc.). No need to reinvent the wheel, there are well-established frameworks for companies to work with.

    There is, however, one major problem that needs to be addressed: the lack of standardized metrics, datasets, methodologies and tools for extracting insights from Open Source projects is real.

  • In support of Coraline Ada Ehmke

    Last night, the linux.org DNS was hijacked and redirected to a page that doxed her. Coraline is doing extremely valuable work with the Contributor Covenant code of conduct, which many free software projects have adopted already.

  • Focusing on the simple things

    Which I guess shows that I could've spent the time thinking about an interesting concept on more pragmatic things, like testing the surveil script on another machine.

    Finally, I'm looking for a way to do testing; and I'm wondering of a good way to test that the command-line interface functions as expected as well.

  • Introducing PySide2 (Qt for Python) Snap Runtime

    Lately at Crossbar.io, we have been PySide2 for an internal project. Last week it reached a milestone and I am now in the process of code cleanup and refactoring as we had to rush quite a few things for that deadline. We also create a snap package for the project, our previous approach was to ship the whole PySide2 runtime (170mb+) with the Snap, it worked but was a slow process, because each new snap build involved downloading PySide2 from PyPI and installing some deb dependencies.

  • Quick Tip: SQLAlchemy for MySQL and Pandas

    For years I’ve used the mysql-python library for connecting to mysql databases. It’s worked well for me over the years but there are times when you need speed and/or better connection management that what you get with mysql-python. That’s where SQLAlchemy comes in.

    Before diving into this, if you are doing things that aren’t dependent on speed (e.g., it doesn’t matter if it takes 1 second to connect to the database and grab your data and close the database) then you can easily ignore this tip. That said, if you have multiple connections, that connect time can add up.

    For example, I recently had an issue where it was taking 4.5+ seconds to connect to a database, run analysis and spit out the results. That’s not terrible if its something for you only but if its a production system and speed is a requirement, that might be too long (and it IS too long).

  • Mopidy-MPRIS 2.0 released

    I’ve released Mopidy-MPRIS 2.0, the first major update to Mopidy-MPRIS in about 3.5 years.

    Mopidy-MPRIS is a Mopidy extension that makes Mopidy controllable from other programs on the same machine through D-Bus. This makes it possible to control Mopidy from various widgets in GNOME/KDE/etc, as well as with keyboard media keys.

  • I'm moving to the Red Hat OpenJDK team

    I'm very excited to announce that I've moved roles within Red Hat: I am now part of the OpenJDK team!

  • DataExplore – free Python based data plotting and analysis software

    DataExplore is an open source desktop application for data analysis and plotting intended for use in both research and education. It’s targeted at non-programmers who want to perform fairly advanced table manipulation methods. It also offers fast, dynamic plot creation from selected data suitable for publication. A variety of table analysis tools are provided.

    The software seeks to bridge the gap between graphical interface and command driven or programmatic approaches to data analysis. If you find it daunting to use RStudio, DataExplore might be a perfect fit.

    The software is written in Python and is based on the PyData suite of Python libraries. It works with Python 2.7 and <=3.4. It relies on pandas and matplotlib.

    The program allows quick visualization of data, table manipulation tools and supports large data tables. One advantage is the ability to load and work with relatively large tables as compared to spreadsheets. The focus is on data manipulation rather than data entry though cell editing and row/column changes are supported.

  • Automatic continuous development and delivery of a hybrid mobile app

    This makes Node.js an appealing option. Node.js is a JavaScript runtime built on the Chrome V8 JavaScript engine. It can make the API development backend very fast and easy, and it integrates fully with web technologies. You can develop a Cordova plugin, using your Node.js backend, internally in your hybrid app, as I did with the nodejs-cordova-plugin. This plugin, following the Cordova guidelines, integrates a mobile-compatible version of the Node.js platform to provide a full-stack mobile app.

  • Test and Code: 56: Being a Guest on a Podcast - Michael Kennedy
  • Episode #189: War Stories of the Developer Evangelists
  • EuroPython 2019: Venue and location selected
  • Create the about scene for pygame project
  • Seaborn Library for Data Visualization in Python: Part 2
  • Supercell opening new coding school (without teachers or classes)

    Instead, the project has been modelled on pioneering French school École 42. The three-year study program relies on peer-to-peer learning, with students organised into teams and tasked with various projects to demonstrate their skills.

    [...]

    However, the initial applications are only open to those aged between 18 and 30. Given the industry's ongoing battle against ageism, GamesIndustry.biz has reached out to Supercell to see if this will be expanded in future.

  • Supercell clashes games skill shortage with free new coding school

    Applications for the program opened this month, with the first 100 successful applicants due to start in September 2019. The course takes a total of three years to complete and is inspired by Paris-based nonprofit school Ecole 42.

Programming: PHP 7.3.0, Rust 2018, and Python

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Development
  • PHP 7.3.0 Release Announcement

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.3.0. This release marks the third feature update to the PHP 7 series.

  • PHP 7.3.0 Released With Improved Performance, Foreign Function Interface

    PHP 7.3 is out today as the first big update in a year to the PHP7 programming language.

    PHP 7.3 introduces the Foreign Function Interface (FFI) to access functions/variables/structures from C within PHP, a platform independent function for accessing the system's network interface information, an is_countable() function was added, WebP is now supported within the GD image create from string, updated SQLite integration, and a range of other improvements.

  • Rust 2018 is here… but what is it?

    This post was written in collaboration with the Rust Team (the “we” in this article). You can also read their announcement (coming soon) on their blog.

    Starting today, the Rust 2018 edition is in its first release. With this edition, we’ve focused on productivity… on making Rust developers as productive as they can be.

  • PyCon 2019 proposal submission deadline is fast approaching!

    The busy holiday season is upon us and before you know it the new year will be here. January 3rd AoE is the deadline to submit proposals. We've added a draft feature to proposals so you can begin your proposal submission now and come back to make final edits before the January 3rd deadline.

  • Dataquest: An Intro to Deep Learning in Python

    Deep learning is a type of machine learning that’s growing at an almost frightening pace. Nearly every projection has the deep learning industry expanding massively over the next decade. This market research report, for example, expects deep learning to grow 71x in the US and more than that globally over the next ten years. There’s never been a better time than now to get started.

  • Oliver Bestwalter for tox webinar next week

    Python has long distinguished itself with a culture of testing. In the last decade, two libraries have combined to give powerful testing in isolation — pytest and tox. The latter combines easily with pytest to give you a clean environment across test runs, including across multiple versions of Python.

    tox certainly counts as one of those things lots of PyCharm customers know they should know, but don’t yet know. To make it easy to break the ice we’ve invited Oliver Bestwalter to introduce tox in a PyCharm webinar. Oliver is the maintainer of tox and advocate for release automation in projects.

  • PyCharm 2018.3.1 Released with Various Bug Fixes

    PyCharm IDE released version 2018.3.1 one day ago with various bug fixes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 16.04 and higher.

GCC 7.4 Released

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Development
GNU
  • GCC 7 Release Series

    The GNU project and the GCC developers are pleased to announce the release of GCC 7.4.

    This release is a bug-fix release, containing fixes for regressions in GCC 7.3 relative to previous releases of GCC.

  • GCC 7.4 Released With 100+ Bug Fixes

    For those still on the GCC7 stable series rather than the current GCC8 series that soon will be succeeded by GCC9, GCC 7.4 is available today.

    With GCC 7.4 being the first GCC7 update since v7.3 from this past January, there are a lot of regression/bug fixes. In fact, GNU Compiler Collection developers report that more than 100 bugs have been fixed in this latest stable point release.

Qt 5.12 LTS Released

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Development

I’m really happy to announce that we will now fully support Qt for Python, making all of the Qt APIs available to Python developers. The tech preview is currently available for you to test, while the official release will follow shortly after Qt 5.12. Qt for Python originates from the PySide project that we have been hosting on qt-project.org for many years. Qt for Python supports most of Qt’s C++ APIs and makes them accessible to Python programmers. In short: Python developers now can also create complex graphical applications and user interfaces. You can find more details in the Qt for Python blog posts.

Read more

Also: Qt 5.12 Released With Many Improvements, Joined By Qt Creator 4.8

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Security: Updates, Best VPNs for GNU/Linux, and Google+ Chaos Again

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Best VPNs for Linux
  • After a Second Data Leak, Google+ Will Shut Down in April Instead of August
    Back in October, a security hole in Google+’s APIs lead Google to announce it was shutting down the service. Now, a second data leak has surfaced, causing the company to move the shutdown up by four months. This new data leak is quite similar to the first one: profile information such as name, email address, age, and occupation was exposed to developers, even for private profiles. It’s estimated that upwards of 52 million users were affected by this leak. The good news is that while the first hole was open for three years, this one was only an issue for six days, from November 7th to the 13th, 2018.

Linux and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Initial i.MX8 SoC Support & Development Board Possibly Ready For Linux 4.21
    While the i.MX8 series was announced almost two years ago and the open-source developers working on the enablement for these new NXP SoCs hoped for initial support in Linux 4.17, the Linux 4.21 kernel that will be released in the early months of 2019 is slated to possibly have the first i.MX8 support in the form of the i.MX8MQ and also supporting its development/evaluation board.
  • AeonWave: An Open-Source Audio Engine Akin To Microsoft's XAudio2 / Apple CoreAudio
    An open-source audio initiative that's been in development for years but flying under our radar until its lead developer chimed in is AeonWave, which supports Windows and Linux systems while being inspired by Microsoft XAudio and Apple's CoreAudio.
  • Take Linux Foundation Certification Exams from Anywhere
    2018 has seen a new wave of popularity for the open source community and it has sparked more interest in potential engineers, system administrators, and Linux experts. 2019 is around the corner and now is a good time to look up Linux certification examinations that will enable you to progress in your career. The good news we have for you is that the Linux Foundation has made certification examinations available online so that IT enthusiasts can get certificates in a wide range of open source domains.

Games Leftovers

  • The Linux version of Civilization VI has been updated with cross-platform multiplayer support
    Just in time for the holidays, Linux gamers finally have version parity with other platforms. Expect to be able to spend just one more turn playing with friends on other operating systems.
  • John Romero has announced a free unofficial spiritual successor to The Ultimate DOOM's 4th episode
    John Romero, one of the co-founders of id Software has revealed he's been working on SIGIL, a free megawad for the original 1993 DOOM. [...] These boxes, will contain music from Buckethead, along with a custom song written expressly for SIGIL. A tempting purchase for any big DOOM fan, I especially love the sound of a 16GB 3-1/2-inch floppy disk-themed USB. You have until December 24, 2018 to order one and I imagine stock will go quite quickly.
  • Unvanquished Open-Source Game Sees Its First Alpha Release In Nearly Three Years
    Unvanquished had been easily one of the most promising open-source games several years back with decent in-game visuals/art, a continually improving "Daemon" engine that was a distant mod of ioquake3 while leveraging ETXReaL components and more, and all-around a well-organized, advancing open-source game project. Their monthly alpha releases stopped almost three years ago while today that's changed just ahead of Christmas. The Unvanquished developers announced Unvanquished Alpha 51 today as their first release in two years and eight months after having made fifty monthly alpha releases. While this is the fifty-first alpha, the developers say they should soon be ready for the beta drop.
  • Unvanquished, the free and open source shooter has a huge new release now out
    After being quiet for some time, the Unvanquished team is back and they have quite a lot to show off in the new release of their free and open source shooter. This is their first new release since April 2016, so the amount that's changed is quite striking! Hopefully, this will be the start of regular release once again, since they used to do monthly releases a few years ago and it was fun to watch it grow.
  • Valve adds even more gamepad support to their latest client beta
    Valve are continuing to support as many devices as possible with a new Steam client beta now available. Since there's no gamepad to rule them all, it makes sense for Valve to support as many as they can. Even though I love the Steam Controller, I do understand that it's not going to be a good fit for everyone. Now, Steam will support the PowerA wired/wireless GameCube Style controllers, PowerA Enhanced Wireless Controller and the PDP Faceoff Wired Pro Controller to boost their already rather large list of supported devices.
  • The turn-based tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark is coming along nicely
    After a few months in Early Access, the tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark has come along nicely and it's quite impressive. It became available on Steam back in August, this was with same-day Linux support as promised from developer 6 Eyes Studio after their successful Kickstarter.
  • Citra, the Nintendo 3DS emulator now has 'Accurate Audio Emulation'
    Citra, the impressive and quickly moving Nintendo 3DS emulator has a new progress report out and it sounds great. They've made some great progress on accurate audio emulation, with their new "LLE (Accurate)" option. They say this has enabled games like Pokémon X / Y, Fire Emblem Fates and Echoes and more to work. There's a downside though, that currently the performance does take quite a hit with it so they're still recommending the "HLE (Fast)" setting for now. They go into quite a lot of detail about how they got here, with plenty of bumps along the way. Most of the work towards this, was done by a single developer who suffered a bit of a burn-out over it.
  • Mindustry, an open source sandbox Tower Defense game that's a little like Factorio
    Available under the GPL, the developer originally made it for the GDL Metal Monstrosity Jam which happened back in 2017 and it ended up winning! Seems the developer didn't stop development after this, as they're currently going through a new major release with regular alpha builds.
  • Have graphical distortions in Unity games with NVIDIA? Here's a workaround
    It seems a lot of Unity games upgrading to later versions of Unity are suffering from graphical distortions on Linux with an NVIDIA GPU. There is a workaround available.

Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 Released With Just Over 800 Patches On Top Of Wine

Released on Friday was Wine 4.0-RC1 while coming out over the weekend was the Wine-Staging re-base that is carrying still over 800 patches on top of the upstream Wine code-base. Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 is available with 805 patches over what's found in the "vanilla" Wine code-base. But prior to the Wine 4.0 RC1 milestone there were a fair number of patches that were promoted upstream including ntoskrnl, WindowsCodecs, user32, and DXGI changes. Read more