Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Development

Digia spins off Qt as subsidiary

Filed under
Development
KDE

Digia has spun off a subsidiary called “The Qt Company” to unify Qt’s commercial and open source efforts, and debuted a low-cost plan for mobile developers.

The Linux-oriented Qt cross-platform development framework has had a tumultuous career, having been passed around Scandinavia over the yearsfrom Trolltech to Nokia and then from Nokia to Digia. Yet, Qt keeps rolling along in both commercial and open source community versions, continually adding support for new platforms and technologies, and gaining extensive support from mobile developers.

Read more

Qt Creator 3.2.1 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

We are happy to announce Qt Creator 3.2.1. This release contains a range of bugfixes, including fixes for:

a freeze when using the current project or the all projects locator filters via keyboard shortcut
a deployment error in the OS X packages which led to the Clang code model plugin not loading
a crash when opening the context menu on C++ macro parameters
For a full list of fixes, please see our change log.

Read more

Wayland Is Still In Ubuntu 14.10

Filed under
Development
Ubuntu

Still packages and found within the Ubuntu Utopic (14.10) archive are the various Wayland packages. Right now within Ubuntu Universe is Wayland 1.5, the Weston 1.5 compositor release, and various other Wayland-related packages like for VA-API acceleration, the basic GLMark2 benchmark for Wayland, etc. Granted, most of these packages were just supplied by the upstream Debian base and are of no special interest to Canonical. The Wayland packages for Utopic can be found by this package search.

Read more

BattBorg: power your Raspberry Pi with almost any kind of battery

Filed under
Development
Linux

The BattBorg supports most off-the-shelf batteries or battery packs between 7-36V and offers up to 14 hours of battery life for the Model B+ from 8xAA rechargeables…
“The BattBorg is a power converter for your Raspberry Pi which allows you to power the Raspberry Pi off batteries,” explains PiBorg’s Tim Freeburn. “It will work with most batteries/battery packs that are between 7-36V so it’s great for 12V car batteries, 8xAA battery packs, and so on. We’re including an AA battery holder in two of the kits as rechargeable AA’s are inexpensive, and readily available at most shops, and Ebay.”

Read more

Compiler wars: LLVM and GCC compete on speed, security

Filed under
Development
GNU

LLVM has also recently inspired a project named Vellvm, where the design of the program and its output are both formally verified. The compiler's input and production can then be independently proven as consistent to defend against introduced bugs. The CompCert compiler already does this, but only for C; a formally verified version of LLVM could in theory do this for any language.

Read more

Raspberry Pi-powered in-car computer project shifts up a gear

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews

After watching classic TV shows such as Knight Rider and Street Hawk in his youth, IT professional and Raspberry Pi enthusiast Derek Knaggs was inspired to create a low-cost in-car computer using a Raspberry Pi.
The Pi sits in the centre console of his Ford Focus, wired to the display of an Xtrons DVD player (optional) as well as two TFT screens in the rear headrests. Control is via a Xenta wireless keyboard with mouse touchpad, while a smartphone can be used as a wireless hotspot to give the Pi an internet connection on the move.
Having recently added a reverse camera to his already top-notch project, we caught up with Derek to learn more about it…

Read more

LLVM 3.5 Is Finally Available For Download

Filed under
Development
BSD

LLVM 3.5 is now available for fans just not looking for a more liberally licensed compiler but for those dependent upon AMD's GPU LLVM compiler back-end and the other innovative use-cases provided by the LLVM stack.

While no official announcement has yet to hit the mailing lists, LLVM 3.5 and its sub-projects doing 3.5 releases are now available via the download page. LLVM 3.5 brings many new features ranging from better support of new C++ standards to improved back-end compiler targets. Benchmarks on conventional x86_64 Linux targets have shown LLVM/Clang 3.5 performing well but the in-development GCC 5.0 still performing better.

Read more

GCC 5.0 Outruns LLVM 3.5 Compiler By A Bit On Core-AVX2

Filed under
Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks

In anticipation of the LLVM 3.5 release that brings a number of new compiler features -- including possible performance improvements from our benchmarking done earlier today -- here's some benchmarks comparing LLVM Clang 3.5 RC3 to a recent SVN snapshot of the GCC 5.0 compiler that's presently under development.

GCC 5.0 is still under heavy stage one development and isn't anticipated for release likely until H1'2015, so there's still a ways to go with the GNU Compiler Collection, but these brief benchmarks today should provide some nice perspective for how it's shaping up against LLVM Clang 3.5. Of course, as GCC 5.0 nears, we'll have plenty more compiler benchmarks over the months ahead.

Read more

INTERMEDIATE RESULTS OF THE ICON TESTS: BREEZE

Filed under
Development
KDE

The introduction of the new Breeze icon set in KDE let us again wonder, what aspects of an icon set actually takes what impact on the usability of it. We investigated Oxygen and Tango Icons for the LibreOffice project before, but our focus then was on checking all icons of the standard tool bar. This time we focus on different icon sets and will use 13 common actions to compare them.
With this series we are going to test at least 10 different free icon sets: Breeze, Oxygen, Tango, Faenza, Nuvola, Nitrux, Elementary, Crystal Project, Humanity and Treepata. These icon sets differ on various aspects: use of color and details, flat or not and sometimes even on the metaphor used.

Read more

LLVM Clang 3.5 Brings Some Compiler Performance Improvements

Filed under
Development
BSD

If all goes well, LLVM 3.5 will be released today. While we have already delivered some LLVM/Clang benchmarks of the 3.5 SVN code, over the days ahead we will be delivering more benchmarks of the updated compiler stack -- including looking at its performance against the in-development GCC 5.0. For getting this latest series of compiler benchmarking at Phoronix started, here's some fresh numbers of LLVM Clang 3.4 compared to a recent release candidate of LLVM Clang 3.5.

This article is using a CompuLab Intense-PC with Intel Core i7 3517UE Ivy Bridge processor for LLVM Clang 3.4 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 benchmarking. The host system was Ubuntu 14.04 x86_64 and was running off the Linux 3.17 development kernel. Both compilers were built in their optimized release mode (--disable-assertions --enable-optimized) for the core-avx-i CPU. Aside from switching out LLVM Clang 3.4 for LLVM Clang 3.5 RC4, no other system changes were made.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Initial impressions of PCLinuxOS 2014.08

I spend more time looking at the family trees of Linux distributions than I do looking at my own family tree. I find it interesting to see how distributions grow from their parent distribution, either acting as an extra layer of features which regularly re-bases itself or as a separate fork. New distributions usually tend to remain similar in most ways to their parent distro, using the same package manager and maintaining similar philosophies. When I look at the family trees of Linux distributions one project stands out more than others: PCLinuxOS. Read more

Speed or torque? Linux desktop vs. server distros

So allow me to clarify: I believe the time has come when a major, dedicated, server-only Linux distribution is needed. This distribution does not maintain any desktop packages or dependencies -- and is not a distro that merely offers a different default package set for desktop and server use cases. Read more

Open source training and the Red Hat Challenge Labs

Open source training is a powerful tool, and the skills and experiences learned can be immediately applied to numerous real-world working situations. The use of a stable and flexible foundation means open source can be adapted to situations as required, making challenges easy to overcome. Red Hat Challenge@Labs is a strong starting point for students, as they have the opportunity to design solutions for real problems and issues—and, if they're successful, pitch them to industry experts. Read more Also: Red Hat Announces General Availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11

Fedora Notifications, 0.3.0 Release

Just as a heads up, a new release of the Fedora Notifications app (FMN) was deployed today (version 0.3.0). Frontend Improvements Negated Rules - Individual rules (associated with a filter) can now be negated. This means that you can now write a rule like: "forward me all messages mentioning my username except for meetbot messages and those secondary arch koji builds." Disabled Filters - Filters can now be disabled instead of just deleted, thus letting you experiment with removing them before committing to giving them the boot. Limited Info - The information on the "context" page is now successively revealed. Previously, when you first visited it, you were presented with an overwhelming amount of information and options. It was not at all obvious that you had to 'enable' a context first before you could receive messages. It was furthermore not obvious that even if you had it enabled, you still had to enter an irc nick or an email address in order for things to actually work. It now reveals each section as you complete the preceding ones, hopefully making things more intuitive -- it warns you that you need to be signed on to freenode and identified for the confirmation process to play out. Truncated Names - Lastly and least, on the "context" page, rule names are no longer truncated with a ..., so you can more easily see the entirety of what each filter does. Read more