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Mozilla: Localisation, DNS over HTTPs (DoH) and Restricting Notification Permission Prompts in Firefox

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  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – October 2019

    Shina is from Pune, Maharashtra, India. Her journey started with the Mozilla Pune community while she was in college in 2017, with Localization in Hindi and quality assurance bugs.

    She’s been an active contributor to the community and since then has helped a lot of newcomers in their onboarding and helping them understand better what the Mozilla Community is all about.

  • Asking Congress to Examine the Data Practices of Internet Service Providers

    At Mozilla, we work hard to ensure our users’ browsing activity is protected when they use Firefox. That is why we launched enhanced tracking protection this year – to safeguard users from the pervasive online tracking of personal data by ad networks and companies. And over the last two years, Mozilla, in partnership with other industry stakeholders, has been working to develop, standardize, and deploy DNS over HTTPs (DoH). Our goal with DoH is to protect essentially that same browsing activity from interception, manipulation, and collection in the middle of the network.

    This dedication to protecting your browsing activity is why today we’ve also asked Congress to examine the privacy and security practices of internet service providers (ISPs), particularly as they relate to the domain name services (DNS) provided to American consumers. Right now these companies have access to a stream of a user’s browsing history. This is particularly concerning in light of to the rollback of the broadband privacy rules, which removed guardrails for how ISPs can use your data. The same ISPs are now fighting to prevent the deployment of DoH.

  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Restricting Notification Permission Prompts in Firefox

    In April we announced our intent to reduce the amount of annoying permission prompts for receiving desktop notifications that our users are seeing on a daily basis. To that effect, we ran a series of studies and experiments around restricting these prompts.

    [...]

    Most of the heavy lifting here was done by Felix Lawrence, who performed a thorough analysis of the data we collected. You can read his full report for our Firefox Release study. I will highlight some of the key takeaways:

    Notification prompts are very unpopular. On Release, about 99% of notification prompts go unaccepted, with 48% being actively denied by the user. This is even worse than what we’ve seen on Nightly, and it paints a dire picture of the user experience on the web. To add from related telemetry data, during a single month of the Firefox 63 Release, a total of 1.45 Billion prompts were shown to users, of which only 23.66 Million were accepted. I.e, for each prompt that is accepted, sixty are denied or ignored. In about 500 Million cases during that month, users actually spent the time to click on “Not Now”.

    Users are unlikely to accept a prompt when it is shown more than once for the same site. We had previously given websites the ability to ask users for notification every time they visit a site in a new tab. The underlying assumption that users would want to take several visits to make up their minds turns out to be wrong. As Felix notes, around 85% of prompts were accepted without the user ever having previously clicked “Not Now”.

    Most notification prompts don’t follow user interaction. Especially on Release, the overall number of prompts that are already compatible with this intervention is very low.

    Prompts that are shown as a result of user interaction have significantly better interaction metrics. This is an important takeaway. Along with the significant decrease in overall volume, we can see a significantly better rate of first-time allow decisions (52%) after enforcing user interaction on Nightly. The same can be observed for prompts with user interaction in our Release study, where existing users will accept 24% of first-time prompts with user interaction and new users would accept a whopping 56% of first-time prompts with user interaction.

Tracking Diaries with Matt Navarra

  • Tracking Diaries with Matt Navarra

    In Tracking Diaries, we invited people from all walks of life to share how they spent a day online while using Firefox’s privacy protections to keep count of the trackers that tried to follow them.

    Whenever you’re online, a multitude of third parties attempt to record what you’re doing, largely without your knowledge or consent. Creepy! That’s why Firefox has turned the tables, letting you block and see the trackers. Read on to find out how many trackers tried to trail Matt Navarra throughout his day, and how he felt about it.

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