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Graphics: Second RC of Mesa 19.1.0, NVIDIA 430.14 Driver for Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.1.0-rc2
    Hello, list.
    
    The second release candidate for Mesa 19.1.0 is now available.
    
    Remind that right now there are two bugs blocking the final release:
    
    #110302 - [bisected][regression] piglit egl-create-pbuffer-surface and egl-gl-colorspace regressions
    #110357 - [REGRESSION] [BISECTED] [OpenGL CTS] cts-runner --type=gl46 fails in new attempted "41" configuration
    
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (1):
          radv: Do not use extra descriptor space for the 3rd plane.
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
          anv: Fix limits when VK_EXT_descriptor_indexing is used
    
    Dave Airlie (1):
          kmsro: add _dri.so to two of the kmsro drivers.
    
    Dylan Baker (1):
          meson: Force the use of config-tool for llvm
    
    Eric Engestrom (1):
          travis: fix syntax, and drop unused stuff
    
    Gert Wollny (1):
          softpipe/buffer: load only as many components as the the buffer resource type provides
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (1):
          Update version to 19.1.0-rc2
    
    Józef Kucia (1):
          radv: clear vertex bindings while resetting command buffer
    
    Kenneth Graunke (5):
          i965: Fix BRW_MEMZONE_LOW_4G heap size.
          i965: Force VMA alignment to be a multiple of the page size.
          i965: leave the top 4Gb of the high heap VMA unused
          i965: Fix memory leaks in brw_upload_cs_work_groups_surface().
          iris: Use full ways for L3 cache setup on Icelake.
    
    Leo Liu (1):
          winsys/amdgpu: add VCN JPEG to no user fence group
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (4):
          anv: rework queries writes to ensure ordering memory writes
          anv: fix use after free
          anv: Use corresponding type from the vector allocation
          vulkan/overlay: keep allocating draw data until it can be reused
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          st/mesa: fix 2 crashes in st_tgsi_lower_yuv
    
    Rob Clark (1):
          freedreno/ir3: fix rasterflat/glxgears
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (1):
          radv: fix setting the number of rectangles when it's dyanmic
    
    Timothy Arceri (1):
          Revert "glx: Fix synthetic error generation in __glXSendError"
    
    Tomeu Vizoso (2):
          panfrost: Fix two uninitialized accesses in compiler
          panfrost: Only take the fast paths on buffers aligned to block size
    
    git tag: mesa-19.1.0-rc2
  • Mesa 19.1-RC2 Released For Testing With The Latest Intel & Radeon Driver Fixes

    We are coming up on the Mesa 19.1 quarterly feature release hopefully by the end of the month while out today is the second release candidate for evaluating this next big update to these OpenGL and Vulkan driver implementations.

  • NVIDIA 430.14 driver released, DiRT 4 and Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus (Steam Play) get improvements

    NVIDIA today pushed out the 430.14 stable driver, it comes with a few notable improvements but it's quite a small release overall.

    This time around they named two titles specifically seeing driver improvements. They noted that DiRT 4 with Vulkan, a more recent Linux port from Feral Interactive should see improvements with Vulkan. Additionally, Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus when played in Steam Play should see performance improvements thanks to "support for presentation from queue families which only expose VK_QUEUE_COMPUTE_BIT" and it also adds support for the Quadro P2200.

  • NVIDIA 430.14 Linux Driver Improves Vulkan Performance For DiRT 4, Steam Play Games

    NVIDIA released the 430.14 Linux driver today as their first non-beta driver build in this 430 branch.

    This new driver builds on the earlier 430.09 beta driver like better VDPAU interoperability while now having some performance optimizations around DiRT 4 that is powered on Linux by Vulkan. There are also various other Vulkan driver improvements to help Steam Play games like Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus.

Nvidia 430.14 Linux Driver Improves Performance for DiRT 4

  • Nvidia 430.14 Linux Driver Improves Performance for DiRT 4 and Wolfenstein II

    Nvidia has released today new long-lived stable graphics drivers for Linux, BSD, and Solaris systems to add a bunch of various enhancements, bug fixes, and performance improvements for some games.
    The Nvidia 430.14 display driver is now available for Linux-based operating system with performance improvements for the DiRT 4 video game, which was ported last month by UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive to Linux and Mac platforms, as well as for the Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus first-person shooter video game, which is available as a Steam Play title.

    The Nvidia 430.14 display driver also adds new functionality to the Nvidia VDPAU driver, including support for decoding HEVC YUV 4:4:4 streams, new per-decoder profile capability, support for accessing YUV 4:4:4 surfaces, support for creating YUV 4:4:4 video surfaces, and support for allocating VDPAU video surfaces with explicit frame or field picture structure.

Nvidia 430.14 Linux Driver Improves Performance for DiRT 4

  • Nvidia 430.14 Linux Driver Improves Performance for DiRT 4 and Wolfenstein II

    The Nvidia 430.14 display driver is now available for Linux-based operating system with performance improvements for the DiRT 4 video game, which was ported last month by UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive to Linux and Mac platforms, as well as for the Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus first-person shooter video game, which is available as a Steam Play title.

    The Nvidia 430.14 display driver also adds new functionality to the Nvidia VDPAU driver, including support for decoding HEVC YUV 4:4:4 streams, new per-decoder profile capability, support for accessing YUV 4:4:4 surfaces, support for creating YUV 4:4:4 video surfaces, and support for allocating VDPAU video surfaces with explicit frame or field picture structure.

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