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A Look at the New Gentoo Based Sabayon 19.03 and Gentoo Based ChromeOS

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  • Sabayon 19.03 overview | The beginner-friendly Gentoo-based Linux distribution.

    In this video, i am going to show an overview of Sabayon 19.03 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Google I/O 2019 schedule goes live with sessions on Stadia, Dark Mode, Linux on Chrome OS, and more

    Google I/O is one of the biggest developer conferences held by Google every year, wherein they announce upcoming changes to Google services and how developers should react in order to prepare themselves for these changes. Google I/O 2019 is scheduled to begin on May 7, 2019 at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California (USA), and now, Google has posted the initial schedule for the conference.

    As expected, I/O 2019 will kick off with the main Google keynote at 10AM PDT, and will be hosted by key Google executives, including Mr. Sundar Pichai, in all likelihood. As it does every year, this event will provide an overview of upcoming changes to Google products and services, including Android and its next version, Android Q. This event will be livestreamed, so you won’t be missing out on too much if you did not manage to score a ticket.

  • 4K Video Editing on Chromebooks May Be Possible Soon

    If Google’s Stadia project ends up delivering the way it promises, there will be a totally viable gaming solution for Chromebooks. For photo and graphic editing, there are options like Pixlr, Gravit Designer on the web and Photoshop or Lightroom on Android. Add to that a very workable solution in GIMP and Inkscape in Linux and you have most of your photo and graphic editing needs met.

More Gentoo

  • Gentoo-Based Sabayon Linux Is Still Alive, New Release Adds Full Disk Encryption

    After a few months of silence, the Gentoo-based Sabayon Linux operating system has finally received a new release with up-to-date images that bring not only updated components from the Gentoo Linux repositories, but also new features and much-needed improvements.

    Backed by a brand-new build infrastructure and powered by Linux kernel 4.20, Sabayon Linux 19.03 release is here with full disk encryption support via the Calamares graphical installer, which replaces Anaconda as default installer, support for 32-bit UEFI systems, Dracut as a replacement for genkernel-nex as initramfs generation utility, and Python 3 by default.

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