Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google

Chrome and Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • The False Teeth of Chrome's Ad Filter.

    Today Google launched a new version of its Chrome browser with what they call an "ad filter"—which means that it sometimes blocks ads but is not an "ad blocker." EFF welcomes the elimination of the worst ad formats. But Google's approach here is a band-aid response to the crisis of trust in advertising that leaves massive user privacy issues unaddressed.

    Last year, a new industry organization, the Coalition for Better Ads, published user research investigating ad formats responsible for "bad ad experiences." The Coalition examined 55 ad formats, of which 12 were deemed unacceptable. These included various full page takeovers (prestitial, postitial, rollover), autoplay videos with sound, pop-ups of all types, and ad density of more than 35% on mobile. Google is supposed to check sites for the forbidden formats and give offenders 30 days to reform or have all their ads blocked in Chrome. Censured sites can purge the offending ads and request reexamination.

    [...]

    Some commentators have interpreted ad blocking as the "biggest boycott in history" against the abusive and intrusive nature of online advertising. Now the Coalition aims to slow the adoption of blockers by enacting minimal reforms. Pagefair, an adtech company that monitors adblocker use, estimates 600 million active users of blockers. Some see no ads at all, but most users of the two largest blockers, AdBlock and Adblock Plus, see ads "whitelisted" under the Acceptable Ads program. These companies leverage their position as gatekeepers to the user's eyeballs, obliging Google to buy back access to the "blocked" part of their user base through payments under Acceptable Ads. This is expensive (a German newspaper claims a figure as high as 25 million euros) and is viewed with disapproval by many advertisers and publishers.

  • Going Home
  • David Humphrey: Edge Cases
  • Experiments in productivity: the shared bug queue

    Over the next six months, Mozilla is planning to switch code review tools from mozreview/splinter to phabricator. Phabricator has more modern built-in tools like Herald that would have made setting up this shared queue a little easier, and that’s why I paused…briefly

  • Improving the web with small, composable tools

    Firefox Screenshots is the first Test Pilot experiment to graduate into Firefox, and it’s been surprisingly successful. You won’t see many people talking about it: it does what you expect, and it doesn’t cover new ground. Mozilla should do more of this.

Google's Bogus Ad 'Blocker' for Chrome

Filed under
Google

Google Summer of Code 2018

Filed under
Development
Google
OSS

New Chrome Beta

Filed under
Google
  • Chrome 65 Beta: CSS Paint API and the ServerTiming API

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 65 Now In Beta With The CSS Paint API

    Google released the latest beta of the Chrome/Chromium web-browser today. Chrome 65 Beta isn't as exciting as some past browser updates, but there are still some new additions to note.

  • Chrome Adding Shorter Shortcut For Bookmarks: Windows and Linux Only.

    Improvements to accessibility are always welcome additions to any software and web browsers are no exception. Clearly, we are fans of Chrome and that includes Google’s browser in all its forms across every available platform. So, we celebrate with all the non-Chrome OS users when developers bring refinements to the world’s most popular window to the web.

Google ignores licence-violating clones of VLC

Filed under
GNU
Google

Cloned versions of the popular VideoLAN media player, better known as VLC, with ads embedded and in violation of the VLC licence, have been residing on the Google Play Store for a long time with the search company doing nothing about them, it is claimed.

The website Torrent Freak reported that a clone of VLC, named 321 Media Player, had been downloaded between five and ten million times and earned a 4.5 score from 101,000 reviews.

A second clone, known as Indian VLC Player, has more than 500,000 downloads.

Read more

Acer Chrome OS Tablet spotted at Bett Education Expo

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Google’s offering two open source operating systems, Android and Chrome OS, has drawn some criticism and market confusion. But this didn’t stop Chrome OS from carving out a sizeable market chunk for itself, primarily in the education field. With growing Android App support, it now appears to be expanding on to tablets as well. A photo has emerged in a now-deleted tweet that appears to be an Acer tablet running Chrome OS.

At the recently concluded Bett education and technology show in London, Acer officially unveiled three Chrome OS devices: two Chromebooks and a Chromebox. However, one of the attendee at the event, Alister Payne, managed to get a photo of one more Chrome OS device from Acer. The photo, posted on Twitter by @Alister_Payne, clearly shows what would be the first Chrome OS tablet. There’s a visible Acer logo on the bottom bezel. The tweet has now been deleted, but not before ChromeUnboxed, preserved it.

Read more

Browsers: Firefox on Amazon, Firefox 59, and New Chrome

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Get Firefox on your Amazon Fire TV, now with Turbo Mode

    Amazon Fire TV users! Here at Mozilla, we believe you should have the ability to watch what you want or view the web how you want. Firefox for Fire TV, our browser for discovering and watching web video on TV, is here on Amazon Fire TV and Fire TV stick. You can launch popular video websites, like YouTube or Vimeo, load any website address and search the web for videos to play full screen on your TV, all from the comfort of your couch.

  • Firefox 59 Might Ship With Working Wayland Support

    Besides Firefox 59 being the release doing away with GTK2 support, this next Mozilla web-browser release might be the one to achieve working native Wayland support.

    For seven years there has been Bug 635134 for tracking a Firefox Wayland port so the web-browser would play nicely on this next-gen alternative to the X.Org Server.

  • Google Chrome 64 Rolls Out to Desktops with Meltdown and Spectre Patches

    Google has promoted its Chrome 64 web browser to the stable channel today for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms, finally bringing the patches for the Meltdown and Spectre timing attacks.

    Chrome 64 has been in beta phase for the past six weeks, though it's been in development since the end of October 2017. It's the first release of the web browser to ship with security fixes to address the Meltdown and Spectre timing attacks. Google has detailed these patches earlier this month.

  • Google Chrome 64 is rolling out to Windows, Mac and Linux

    Google has started to roll out the latest version of its browser, Chrome 64, to Windows, Mac and Linux devices. The update will arrive to users throughout the next few days or weeks and comes with some handy features and important mitigation related to the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities.

  • Chrome 64 rolling out to Mac, Windows, Linux w/ CPU mitigations, improved pop-up blocker, sitewide audio muting
  • Chrome 64, GCC 7.3, Librem 5 Phone Progress and More

    Chrome 64 is now available for Linux, Mac and Windows, featuring a stronger ad blocker and several security fixes, including mitigations for Spectre and Meltdown. See the release updates for more info.

  • Google: Chrome 64 is out now, giving you tougher pop-up blocker, Spectre fixes

    Google has released Chrome 64 for Windows, Mac, and Linux, bringing a stronger pop-up blocker, over 50 security fixes, and more mitigations for the Spectre attack.

    As Google promised last year, Chrome 64 introduces a stronger pop-up block to protect against sneaky tactics that lead users to unwanted content through redirects.

    The abusive experiences that the blocker targets are practices often used by shadier sections of the web, including ads or parts of a page that create bogus site warnings and error messages, 'close' buttons that that do something other than close a page element, and play buttons that open third-party sites offering to download an app.

Proprietary Chrome Has New Release

Filed under
Google
Web

Top 4 open source alternatives to Google Analytics

Filed under
Google
OSS

If you have a website or run an online business, collecting data on where your visitors or customers come from, where they land on your site, and where they leave is vital. Why? That information can help you better target your products and services, and beef up the pages that are turning people away.

To gather that kind of information, you need a web analytics tool.

Many businesses of all sizes use Google Analytics. But if you want to keep control of your data, you need a tool that you can control. You won’t get that from Google Analytics. Luckily, Google Analytics isn’t the only game on the web.

Here are four open source alternatives to Google Analytics.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.

FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs)

  • FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown
    Landing in FreeBSD today was the mitigation work for the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities. It's taken a few more weeks longer than most of the Linux distributions to be re-worked for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation as well as DragonFlyBSD, but with FreeBSD Revision 329462 it appears their initial fixes are in place. There is Meltdown mitigation for Intel CPUs via a KPTI implementation similar to Linux, the Kernel Page Table Isolation. There is also a PCID (Process Context Identifier) optimization for Intel Westmere CPUs and newer, just as was also done on Linux.
  • FreeBSD outlaws virtual hugs
  • AsiaBSDCon 2018 Conference Programme

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more