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Games: SpatialOS Controversy, Steam Play, SuperTuxKart

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  • Epic and Improbable are taking advantage of Unity with the SpatialOS debacle, seems a little planned

    As an update to the ongoing saga between Improbable and Unity in regards to SpatialOS, Epic Games have now jumped in to take advantage of it. To be clear, I don't consider myself biased in any way towards any game engine, especially as I am not a game developer.

    As a quick overview of what happened:

    - Improbable put out a blog post, claiming Unity overnight blocked SpatialOS and made Unity out to be a real bad company. Improbable then open source their Unity GDK.

    - Unity made their own response, mentioning that they told Improbable a year ago about the issues. Let's be real here, revoking the Unity licenses of SpatialOS wouldn't have been a quickly-made decision. Unity have also mentioned repeatedly now about making their TOS (terms of service) a lot clearer.

  • Steam Play recently hit 500 Windows games rated as Platinum on ProtonDB

    Here's a fun statistic for you today! Steam Play, Valve's fork of Wine which includes DXVK has recently hit 500 titles rated as "Platinum" when going by ProtonDB reports.

    So that's 500 games, that aren't supported by the developer on Linux that should for the most part be click and play from within the Steam client on Linux. If we include games trending towards a Platinum rating, it's even higher at 569. That's pretty impressive considering Steam Play hasn't been out for too long. It's worth mentioning though of course, that Wine has been around for a long time.

  • SuperTuxKart 0.10 Beta Released With Initial Networking Support

    The Tux-themed MarioKart-inspired SuperTuxKart animated racing game is out with its v0.10 Beta 1 release that delivers on initial LAN/Internet-based multiplayer support.

    Today's SuperTuxKart 0.10 Beta 1 release brings initial WAN/LAN networking support for being able to race against others with this preliminary networking implementation.

    The networking implementation is light enough that a Raspberry Pi 3 is powerful enough to act as a SuperTuxKart game server.

SuperTuxKart’s Online Multiplayer is Ready for Testing

More on SpatialOS' cloud-based multiplayer Game Development Kit

  • Improbable snubs Unity, partners with Epic for $25M “open engine” fund [Updated]

    Unity Engine games developed with SpatialOS' cloud-based multiplayer Game Development Kit (GDK) are now in violation of Unity's terms of service, according to SpatialOS maker Improbable. The decision imperils the operation of many in-development game projects, including some that have already been released to the public.

    Since its open beta release in 2017 (in partnership with Google), SpatialOS has allowed developers to easily integrate mass-scale multiplayer into their games by running a persistent version of the game in the cloud. But Improbable now says that a recent change in Unity's terms of service means the SpatialOS is essentially blocked from working with the Unity Engine.

    The newly updated clause 2.4 of the Terms of Service now specifically excludes "managed service[s] running on cloud infrastructure" which "install or execute the Unity Runtime on the cloud or a remote server." Though the terms of service were changed on December 5, Improbable says Unity confirmed directly to them this week that the update "specifically disallow[s] services like Improbable’s to function with their engine. This was previously freely possible in their terms, as with other major engines."

    As a result, Improbable says, "this change effectively makes it a breach of terms to operate or create SpatialOS games using Unity, including in development and production games." That list of imperiled games includes Bossa Studios MMO Worlds Adrift, VR MMO MetaWorld, and Klang Games' upcoming MMO Seed, among others.

SuperTuxKart 0.10 beta

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