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Games: Google Stadia, Forge and Fight, Relic Hunters Legend, Port Valley

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Gaming
  • Google Stadia Gaming Platform Needs Min 25Mb/s Internet Speed

    Google has released the specifications of its upcoming game streaming platform known as Google Stadia. The game streaming platform from the tech giant will use custom made processor and an ultra-fast graphics card in its forthcoming console.

    While the CPU will be a 2.7GHz x86 custom-made chip with hyper-threading and 9.5 MB L2+L2 cache, AMD will handle the graphical duties with a 10.7 Teraflops GPU with 56 compute units and HMB2 memory. Stadia machine will have 16GB of RAM along with 484GB/s of high transfer speed. Additionally, an SSD will be used for maximum performance to increase the load-time.

  • Forge and Fight might be the most hilarious prototype I've played recently

    Always keen to see what new types of experiences developers are looking to offer, I often try out game prototypes. Forge and Fight is one where you make your own weapon and it's pretty amusing.

    Since it's a prototype, it's obviously quite basic. However the promise with this one is very clear! Pick a handle and then basically stick anything on it and swing it around at your enemies! How about a fancy looking sword? Sure you could do that—or you could swing around multiple Scythes attached by a chain link with a flamethrower, a couple of spike balls and a boxing glove because why the hell not.

  • The shoot and loot RPG 'Relic Hunters Legend' is looking good in the latest trailer

    ...it's coming to Linux and certainly still seems to be that way as the trailer even has the Linux "tux" logo included and the current FAQ clearly mentions Linux as a platform...

  • Port Valley, a "not so classic" point & click adventure now has a Linux demo

    From developer WrongPixel, Port Valley is an in development point & click adventure that's "not so" classic apparently.

    Honestly, I had never heard of this before or at least I don't remember hearing about it at all. Turns out a few days ago it gained a Linux demo and it does seem to work quite nicely. Seems like a very interesting point and click game, one the developer said is only aiming to borrow some mechanics from the past while showing the genre "still has a lot to say".

Games: Overland, Lutris, Dead Cells and Fossilize

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Gaming
  • The impressive squad-based survival strategy game Overland to release this autumn

    Overland from Finji is a beautiful looking and impressive squad-based strategy game and they've now announced a release window.

  • The open source game manager Lutris had another sweet update recently

    What's that, too many launchers or no easy way to manage GOG games on Linux? Lutris might solve this problem for you.

    Giving you the ability to install and manage games from Steam, GOG, Humble Store, Emulators and more it's a pretty handy application to keep around. This latest release is mostly improving on existing features like downloading the default Wine version when not already available, preventing duplicated entries when importing games from a 3rd party, one search bar to rule them all, improved log handling performance, using your discrete GPU by default on compatible systems and more.

  • Dead Cells - Rise of the Giant free DLC to release this week, over 1 million copies sold

    Ready for just one more run? The Dead Cells - Rise of the Giant free DLC is releasing this week (March 28th) as Motion Twin celebrate good sales.

    The developer spoke at GDC and they went on to mention that Dead Cells has now officially sold over 1 million copies! Around 60% of that was on PC too, so the indie market for good games is still alive and well by the looks of it.

  • Fossilize Is Valve's Latest Open-Source Vulkan Project

    Valve Software has been backing work on Fossilize as an open-source project providing a serialization format for persistent Vulkan object types.

    Valve has been backing Hans-Kristian Arntzen to work on this Vulkan project while it has also seen commits by their in-house Vulkan guru Dan Ginsburg. The Fossilize library and Vulkan layer is intended so these persistent Vulkan persistent object types can be backed by the pipeline cache, a Vulkan layer to capture the cache, and the ability to replay the cache on different devices without having to run the application itself.

Games: Lutris, Flux Caves, Cities: Skylines

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Gaming
  • Lutris 0.5.1 Brings Improved GOG Integration, Various Fixes

    Released at the start of February was the big Lutris 0.5 release with an enhanced GTK interface, GOG.com support, and much more for this open-source gaming platform. Lutris 0.5.1 is now available with some much needed fixes.

  • In the puzzle game Flux Caves you will be pushing around blocks to play with large marbles

    If you like puzzle games and marbles today is your lucky day as I came across Flux Caves, which merges them into one game.

    It's early-on in development but it has a pretty great idea. It's like piecing together an oversized marble-run, with each level having various tubes and other special blocks missing that you need to slot into place.

  • Cities: Skylines is another game having a free weekend on Steam right now

    As a reminder, it recently turned four years old and it's showing no signs of slowing down with multiple thousands on it every day. If you do decide to give it a go, I highly recommend the Clouds & Fog Toggler mod from the Steam Workshop to give you a really clear view.

    That's another thing that I love about Cities: Skylines, there's a huge amount of extra content available for it like maps, mods, scenarios and more. The mod selection is incredibly varied too from simple tools to automatically bulldoze abandoned or burned down buildings to adding in entirely new ways to play.

How to set up Fedora Silverblue as a gaming station

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Red Hat
Gaming
HowTos

This process starts with a clean Fedora 29 Silverblue installation with a user already created for you.

First, go to https://flathub.org/home and enable the Flathub repository on your system. To do this, click the Quick setup button on the main page.

Read more

Gaming: DeviluitionX, Walmart, Stadia, Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, Baba Is You, Epic, We. The Revolution and More

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Gaming
  • DeviluitionX: Enjoying The 23 Year Old Diablo Game Atop An Open-Source Engine

    The latest open-source game engine project working to re-implement a legendary commercial game is DeviluitionX. This new effort is an open-source re-implementation of Blizzard's Diablo game from 1996 while now working on Linux and other operating systems nicely.

    The DeviluitionX effort has already reached "a fully playable state on Linux / macOS / Windows, with only minor issues remaining." DeviluitionX does require the game assets from the official Diablo release, which is now available easily from GOG.com following the recent Diablo release on that DRM-free platform.

  • Walmart Is Planning Its Own Gaming Streaming Service: Report

    Google recently entered the $140 billion gaming industry by launching Stadia, a cloud-gaming service. The company garnered a lot of attention from tech enthusiasts as it showcased the service that supports 4K resolutions and gaming at 60fps.

  • Exclusive: Walmart is Talking to Developers and Publishers About a Potential Streaming Service

    Google made headlines this week when it announced its arrival into the video game space with a new streaming venture called Stadia. But according to sources, another major corporation is investigating the video game streaming business too, and it's none other than Walmart.

    Multiple sources familiar with Walmart's plans, who wish to remain anonymous, confirmed to USG that the retail giant is exploring its own platform to enter in the now-competitive video game streaming race. No other details were revealed other than it will be a streaming service for video games, and that Walmart has been speaking with developers and publishers since earlier this year and throughout this year's Game Developers Conference.

  • Google Has Killed 147 Projects, Will Stadia Join Them?
  • In Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, music is your weapon and it's coming to Linux

    One Kickstarter I completely missed is Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, a musical themed quirky RPG where music is your weapon. The campaign is over and it managed to smash the funding goal, with Linux noted as a release platform.

    Based on the Deathbulge comic from Dan Martin (who is involved too of course in this), over two thousand backers pledged their support to give the developers just under sixty thousand dollars to bring the game to life. It smashed some stretch goals, including bringing in guest artists and having more character classes.

  • Baba Is You is an excellent rule-breaking puzzle game, some thoughts

    Baba Is You, a recent puzzle game release from Hempuli Oy offers a pretty different take on the genre and I have some thoughts. Note: My key was provided by the developer directly. Also, likely spoilers contained within.

    Baba is honestly like no other puzzle game I can think of, one where you are literally changing the rules of the game to progress through each level and it's a magical experience. Truthfully, I thought it would be quite a simple game considering the mechanics but I've been massively surprised overall.

  • Epic Games new 'Epic Online Services' will support Linux and it's free for developers to use

    Building upon the work they've done with Fortnite, it's going to offer support for: Parties, an in-game Overlay, Matchmaking, Player reports, Achievements, leaderboards, stats and so on. Don't get too excited though, as right now it's only offering Game analytics (telemetry about players) and a support ticket system with everything else "Coming soon".

  • We. The Revolution sounds pretty awesome and it's out now

    Set in the blood-soaked and paranoid world of the French Revolution, We. The Revolution from Polyslash is officially out with Linux support.

    As much as I wanted to have some thoughts on it, given how incredibly interesting it sounds, I can't. GOG's Linux team sent over a copy but I'm not quite sure what's going on with the GOG release at this point. It advertises Linux support yet it has no Linux download even though supposed to have one, so there's some kind of delay on GOG's side with it. Update: Now actually live on GOG too.

  • 2D indie platformer fighter 'Super Powered Battle Friends' looks interesting in the new trailer

    One thing we don't have enough of on Linux, is good platform fighting games and Super Powered Battle Friends is looking pretty good.

    Last time I wrote about it, there wasn't an official trailer to properly show it off.

  • CodeWeavers have released CrossOver 18.5 pulling in Wine 4.0 and FAudio

    For those who want to help with Wine development without contributing code, CodeWeavers host the Wine project and contribute to its development along with their own CrossOver product.

Announcing CrossOver 18.5.0 and Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Announcing CrossOver 18.5.0

    CrossOver 18.5 includes the FAudio library to provide superior audio support for games. FAudio is a reimplementation of XAudio2, a low-level audio library for Windows. This improvement broadens CrossOver’s game compatibility and resolves a wide variety of audio bugs on both macOS and Linux.

    CrossOver 18.5 resolves several Office 2010 bugs related to activation and licensing. The first involves a change which disrupted the activation status of Office 2010 bottles upgraded from CrossOver 17.x and earlier to CrossOver 18.x. Users who experienced persistent activation requests on earlier releases of CrossOver 18 should be able to successfully activate Office 2010 on CrossOver 18.5. We have also resolved a bug which caused Office 2010 to attempt and fail configuration on every launch for some users.

    On Linux, CrossOver 18.5 supports the very latest release of Office 365 and resolves a sign-in bug impacting Office 365 Home users.

    Finally, CrossOver 18.5 includes preliminary support for OneNote 2016 on Linux.

  • CrossOver 18.5 Released - Based On Wine 4.0 While Pulling In FAudio

    CodeWeavers, the main sponsor/contributor to the Wine project, announced the release today of their commercial CrossOver 18.5 software for more easily running Windows games and applications on Linux and macOS.

  • The GOG Spring Sale is now live, tons of titles discounted with flash deals each day

    Someone please lock away my wallet, as the GOG Spring Sale is live and it's full of discounted Linux games.

    For this huge sale, GOG are also doing Flash Deals so every 24 hours a couple of games will get a higher than usual discount so you will need to keep going back for the best.

  • Valve show off their new Steam Library design and a new Events page

    At GDC today, Valve did their presentation and they finally showed off the new design coming for the Library page and more.

    For those with a growing backlog of games, the Steam Library as it is right now is so basic it's just incredibly unhelpful. Going by what they've shown off, it's actually looking a serious amount better. Firstly, it has a home page for your Steam Library, to go over some recent games and recently updated titles, as well as show a slice of your friends list. That's a pretty handy feature, especially if you have a game you play regularly enough it will probably be quicker and easier to get going the next time.

  • You can now try XCOM 2 free until March 25th, also on a big sale

    Firaxis Games have put their strategy game XCOM 2 up to play for free between now and March 25th, so if you've been on the fence this is a great opportunity.

    It's quite easily my absolute favourite strategy game on Linux, much more interesting than the first of the newer XCOM games (although that's still damn fun too). It does have a few niggles and some performance issues here and there but that's not down to Feral Interactive's port as it's not much different on Windows.

  • Humble Store are giving away Tacoma during their Indie Mega Week sale

    Humble Store has another free game from you to grab with Tacoma, along with their Indie Mega Week sale now live.

    I enjoyed my Tacoma play-through, done in a single sitting and I think it's worth grabbing and actually playing. You can see my previous thoughts here. You can grab your free copy here, which requires subbing to their newsletter.

Games: Stadia Scepticism, Epic, Linux Gaming Report and More

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Gaming
  • Stadia is about the future of YouTube, not gaming

    Yesterday, Google announced plans for a new game-streaming service called Stadia. Besides the logo, the controller, and a single game — Doom Eternal — the announcement left us with more questions than answers. Primary in my mind has been the query of why Google needs to be in the gaming business at all. Isn’t it enough to dominate web search, ads, and browsers, smartphone operating systems, and maps? What part of our lives does Google not want to know about? And then it dawned on me that we might be looking at it from the wrong perspective: what if Stadia isn’t a case of Google aggressively entering a new business sphere, but rather a defensive one to protect its existing kingdom?

  • Google Stadia's Grand Vision for Gaming Clashes With America's Shitty Internet

    Slow speeds, usage caps, and overage fees could mar the long-awaited arrival of game streams.

  • Slow Broadband, Usage Caps Could Mar Google Stadia's Game Streaming Ambitions

    I can remember being at E3 in 2000 and being pitched on the idea of a sort of "dumb terminal" for gaming. As in, you wouldn't need a computer or game console in your home, since all of the actual game processing would be accomplished in the cloud then streamed to your TV via broadband. Most of these early pitches never materialized. Initially because cloud computing simply wasn't fully baked yet, but also thanks to America' shoddy broadband.

    Cloud-based game streaming is something the industry has continued to push for, though nobody has yet to truly crack the market. Onlive probably tried the hardest, though again a lack of real cloud horsepower and sketchy residential broadband prevented the service from truly taking off.

    Undaunted, Google took to the stage at the Game Developers Conference to unveil Stadia, a looming game streaming platform that will let gamers play top-shelf games on any hardware with a Chrome browser. Google insists that the service, when it launches this summer, will be able to drive games at up to 4K resolution and 60 frames per second seamlessly between multiple devices with no need for game consoles, high-end PCs, loading times, or installs. The whole presentation is available here:

  • Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney on PC store moderation: ‘We’re not in the porn business’

    Last year, Valve announced a hands-off approach to Steam that would allow anything onto the platform “except for things that we decide are illegal, or straight up trolling.” In addition to the Rape Day controversy, that policy has pushed Valve to take hardline stances on content revolving around child exploitation, school shootings, and most recently around tributes memorializing the New Zealand shooter. Sweeney, it seems, does not see the value it trying to protect content that pushes up against that amorphous line.

  • Linux Gaming Report and Purism Librem 15 | Choose Linux 5

    Jason goes deeper down the rabbit hole by exploring the state of Steam gaming on 9 different Linux distributions. Find out how Fedora compares to Pop!_OS.

    Plus, first impressions of Purism’s brand new Librem 15 v4 laptop.

  • Objects in Space released for Linux on Steam, needs you to disable Steam Play

    While the Linux version has been up on GOG for a little while, Steam was left a bit behind. Now the Linux version on Steam has been officially announced and released but there's an issue with Steam Play.

  • First-person roguelike 'Barony' released the Myths & Outcasts DLC recently, also now on GOG

    Barony is a game I hadn't honestly touched in a very long time, which all changed with the Myths & Outcasts DLC that released last month giving new ways to play. It's also now on GOG, so that's great.

  • Chasm, the adventure platformer from Bit Kid just had a big update giving more variety

    Chasm, the crowdfunded adventure platformer continues to see great post-release support with the latest big free update out now.

    While it's not a personal favourite of mine (I much prefer Dead Cells honestly), it's still a reasonably good game overall. In fact, it's far better than a lot of action/adventure platformers and it does look great.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive now has much better queue times for Danger Zone

    Following on from the tweak to Danger Zone to focus more on duos, Valve are still tweaking their Battle Royale mode in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive as well as the game as a whole.

    Firstly, for Danger Zone you should now see much better queue times for matchmaking. Before this patch, I could easily see queue times around 3 to 5 minutes (often the latter) even with a lot of people online which is not ideal and frankly that makes me (and no doubt others) get bored and look to play something else. Since this patch has dropped, I've played a good 30-40 matches and not a single one has hit even 2 minutes queue time (under 1 minute mostly now!) which is a pretty huge improvement.

Games: SteamOS, Oxygen Not Included, Kingdom Rush Origins, Stadia and WineVulkan

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Gaming
  • SteamOS is alive with a new beta and updated drivers, also a new Steam Client Beta is out

    Valve haven't given up on their home-grown Linux distribution yet, with SteamOS seeing another beta update. Additionally, there's another Steam Client Beta update about.

    As far as updates to SteamOS go, the last time they actually announced anything was with the 2.170 update back in January but they have actually been doing multiple newer builds since then you can see here. Just today, they officially announced the SteamOS 2.183 beta and the gist of it is this...

  • Oxygen Not Included from Klei Entertainment to leave Early Access in May with new content

    Oxygen Not Included, the incredible space-colony sim from Klei Entertainment is leaving Early Access in May and they've detailed some of what's coming and future plans.

    Before I get started, I just want to mention how much I love Oxygen Not Included. It fills me with wonder as much as it charges me with rage at times, especially when all my people are sick and throwing up everywhere or urinating in our clean water. It has a fantastic style to it too, although Klei games always look good (Don't Starve being another example of this). It's quite amusing to rename your people too, makes it quite hilarious when someone you know well goes around wrecking the place. Every game is a new challenge, every cavern you dig into might have something awesome and it's just good fun.

  • Kingdom Rush Origins expanded again recently, the Forgotten treasures expansion is out

    Kingdom Rush Origins, the excellent tower defense game from Ironhide Game Studio is seeing some great updates, with another campaign named Forgotten treasures now up.

  • Google Announces Stadia Cloud Gaming Service Powered by Linux and Vulkan

    Google announced today during the GDC (Game Developers Conference) 2019 conference a new cloud-based video game streaming platform called Stadia.
    With Stadia, Google aims to take on Nvidia's GeForce NOW and Valve's Steam Link game streaming services by offering users select and original titles developed in-house, as well as instant access to your games library, which you'll be able to stream virtually anywhere in up to 4K HDR resolutions at 60 frames per second.

    "To build Stadia, we’ve thought deeply about what it means to be a gamer and worked to converge two distinct worlds: people who play video games and people who love watching them. Stadia will lift restrictions on the games we create and play—and the communities who enjoy them," said Phil Harrison, Vice President and GM, Google Stadia.

    Stadia promises to be an advanced game streaming powered by Google's globally connected network of data centers that combine server class CPU, GPU, RAM, and storage to deliver 24/7 gaming to players around the world and unlimited resources to game developers who want to create original and gorgeous games.

  • Wine Has Landed The Necessary Patches For Vulkan 1.1 Support

    The "WineVulkan" code within Wine for exposing the Vulkan API to Windows games/applications now supports the requirements to last year's Vulkan 1.1 base specification

Pop OS 18.10 Linux Gaming Report: System76 Nails It For Nvidia And AMD Users

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OS
Gaming

Pop!_OS is, in my opinion, a seriously underappreciated Ubuntu-based operating that distinguishes itself in a couple major areas -- in addition to its utter simplicity and slick installer. It was created primarily to be the accompanying OS for the variety of custom Linux desktops and laptops produced by System76, and they've added some features I prefer not to live without regardless of what hardware I'm using.

First, Pop!_OS is one of the only distros I've tried that elegantly handles Hybrid graphics (that's Intel CPU + Nvidia GPU as seen in laptops like the ThinkPad X1 Extreme) out of the box. Moreover, System76 ships two versions of Pop!_OS: one designed for Intel/AMD, and one designed for Nvidia GPUs. The Nvidia ISO installs the proprietary driver so that users don't need to add a repository by hand and install it later.

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Some Quick Graphics/Game Tests With GNOME 3.32 On Clear Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME
Gaming

For about one week already Intel's rolling-release Clear Linux distribution has been shipping with GNOME 3.32. Here are some quick graphics and gaming benchmarks comparing GNOME 3.30.2 to 3.32.0.

Using a Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics card, I tested Clear Linux between its releases having GNOME Shell 3.30 and the move to GNOME Shell 3.30.2. On both builds of Clear Linux, Linux 5.0.1 was in use along with X.Org Server 1.20.4 (they aren't yet defaulting to a Wayland session), and Mesa 19.1-devel.

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Puppy Linux 8.0 Released

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The 6 Best Linux Bandwidth Monitoring Tools in 2019

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NuTyX 11 available with cards 2.4.96

I'm very please to announce the new NuTyX 11 release. The NuTyX 11 is a complete recompilation of all the available binaries on NuTyX. Since everything has been recompiled, most of the packages have been update as well. The base of NuTyX comes with the new kernel LTS 4.19.28 and the very new kernel 5.0.3. The toolchain is completely rebuild around glibc 2.29, gcc 8.3.0 and binutils 2.32. The graphical server is now in xorg-server 1.20.4, the mesa lib in 18.3.4, gtk3 3.24.3, qt 5.12.1. The python 3.7.2 and 2.7.16 are updated as well Read more Also new: Feren OS 19.03 Run Through