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KDE 3.4.1 is Coming Your Way

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KDE
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KDE 3.4.1 is on it's way. It was tagged on May 23 and your favorite distro's developers are toiling away to make a version available for your desktop. It should be released to the general public in less than a week and perhaps your distro will release their version at the approximate same time. Besides starting on the 4.0 branch of kde, developers have been working hard on improving their stable branch. What's new this release?

Some Highlighs include:

  • kdelibs

    • Many bug fixes to khtml such as
      • Apply CSS padding to tables
      • Fix submitted position for scrolled imagemaps
      • Fix links with WBR tags
      • Load external CSS style-sheet with correct charset
      • Various crash fixes
    • kio-http
      • Prevent endless busy loop
    • kssl
      • store SSL passwords in the KDE wallet and reuse as needed
  • kdeaddons
    • Rellinks: Disable the toolbar by default
  • kdeadmin
    • kuser: Fix crash when adding user
  • kdebase
    • konsole
      • Allow xterm resize ESC code to work
      • Fix incorrect schema in detached sessions
      • Fix compile errors on amd64 with gcc4
    • konqueror
      • If Shift is pressed when menu opens show 'Delete' instead of 'Trash'
      • Fix address bar encryption color stays when using back/forward
      • Added hidden option to not show archives as folder in sidebar
    • kicker
      • Fixed K menu entries sort logic
      • Hide sort buttons in systemtray configuration
    • kdesktop: Fix SVG images don't have 'set as wallpaper' entry in context menu when dragged to desktop
    • kinfocenter: Fix OpenGL graphics card detection
  • kdegraphics
    • kpdf
      • Ask when overwriting files
      • Do not leak memory when reloading a document
      • Make Page Up and Page Down work on presentation mode
      • Show context menu when in FullScreen even if no document is open
    • ksnapshot: Rescale screenshot preview when resizing window
  • kdemultimedia
    • akode_plugins
      • Fix crash when playing musepack(MPC) files on AMD64
      • Fix some cases where streaming of Ogg Vorbis failed
    • JuK: Selecting the undo command now undoes only the last change again
  • kdenetwork
    • Kopete
      • Fix crash when KDE logout
      • Fix crash when drag & drop temporary contact to the list
      • Fix crash when ignoring messages from non-buddies
      • Resize correctly wide photos
      • Connecting problems and other sending problems with MSN & Yahoo & ICQ
  • kdeutils
    • Ark: Dead lock in "Add to archive" action when providing invalid archive format
    • kgpg: No "Import Missing Signatures From Keyserver" for own key
    • kfloppy: better error messages during low-level formatting

This is but a partial list of improvements and bug fixes. For a full list please click here.

Screenshots in the Tuxgallery.

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