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Linus, LibreOffice, and Linux

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Today in Linux news, Linus Torvalds posted pictures of him actually flying in real world fighter jets and expressed frustration at new Gmail spam filtering. Caolán McNamara posted a screenshot of LibreOffice running on Wayland and The Document Foundation announced the publication of ODF 1.2 as ISO 26300. Attila Orosz reviewed Antergos and Dedoimedo put SteamOS 2.0 Beta through some tests.

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Canonical Clarifies IP Policy, No One Else Happy

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In the continuing saga of Canonical versus contributors' rights, a clarification was issued today. Most consensus is that Canonical's "trump clause" fixes the largest part of the intellectual property dispute, but still leaves issues unresolved. The Free Software Foundation and the Software Freedom Conservancy played key roles and have issued their own statements. Bradley M. Kuhn, Matthew Garrett, and Jonathan Riddell weigh in as well.

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Fedora Atomic Workstations in Planning Stages

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Container technology has lead to several other areas of development and one of them being an atomic operating system that sandboxes applications and delivers updates in a single image. Red Hat started their Project Atomic to provide applications in a containerized format and produced Atomic Host as the tiny OS on which they'd run. It didn't take long before planners began speaking of doing similar for Fedora and now developers are in the early planning stages of bringing this idea to fruition.

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GNOME is Better and the Practically of Linux

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In Linuxville today Eric Griffith demonstrated why GNOME is better than KDE and Attila Orosz explained what you need to know about systemd. Reviews of Semplice 7, Mint 17.2, and Mangaka caught my eye and Matt Hartley compared Linux to OS X saying, "I believe Linux is a more practical solution than OS X."

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More GNOME: GNOME Foundation AGM 2015

GTG Preferences -- REMADE!

GNOME's Gnote Note-Taking App Gets New Features, Under-the-Hood Improvements

Tin Hats Ready, RMS No Problems Linux Used for Evil

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Security and privacy seemed to be my theme this week and tonight's news brings more. Richard Stallman, "software freedom fighter," told Swapnil Bhartiya, "A program must not restrict what jobs its users do with it." In related news, the same RMS was included in the Business Insider "12 most influential programmers working today" list. Back to the NSA, Michael Larabel said you should be wearing tin foil hats if you're worried about them working on KDBUS. The NSA also uploaded code to Github for sysadmins to "lock down" their Linux machines.

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NSA Code:

  • MIT Introduces Supercomputers to Accumulo

    When the National Security Agency (NSA) in the U.S. released the Accumulo project into open source territory in 2008, there were not a lot of details about the size and capability of the hardware it was running, although it is safe to say that the NSA found ways to make it scale across some of their larger machines. However, as one might imagine, scale alone did not define a successful NSA database system—the security also had to be robust and guaranteed.

  • NSA releases network security tool -- will IT admins use it?

    The NSA has released a network security tool that it claims is designed to help organizations "fortify their networks against cyber attacks". But, after being revealed to be spying on just about anyone it wants to, from US citizens to leaders of allied governments, while undermining major tech firms in the process, IT administrators will likely be very skeptical of adopting it.

  • Wow, another NSA leak: Network security code appears on GitHub

    The NSA today revealed it has uploaded source code to GitHub to help IT admins lock down their networks of Linux machines.

    The open-source software is called the System Integrity Management Platform (SIMP). It is designed to make sure networks comply with US Department of Defense security standards, but the spy agency says it can be adapted by admins to meet individual security needs as well.

Google Not Scoffing at AI, Files Patent Applications

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Linus Torvalds was interviewed by Slashdot last week and his comments on artificial intelligence has been making the rounds since. He basically said AI would not lead to human-like robots because the neural network would remain limited. Despite that, Google has "applied for at least six patents on fundamental neural network and AI." In other news, Kali Linux 2.0 is expected at DEFCON 23 and the Free Software Foundation has approved another Linux OS for its "fully free" list. Docker 'Tinkerer Extraordinaire' said Open Source is hostile to women and Megatotoro posted Pisi Linux is still alive and kicking.

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Red Hat Used by NSA Spies, SELinux Possibly Bypassed

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SELinux is a product of the NSA and some worried when it was added to Red Hat, Fedora, and later many other distributions. Even before Snowden revealed the massive government spying, having the NSA anywhere near Linux activated certain Spidey-senses. Now we learn that SELinux may have had an exploit for bypassing the security enforcements. Italian software company Hacking Team, who admits to providing "technology to the worldwide law enforcement and intelligence communities," has been selling technology to governments (most with bad human rights records) to assist in gathering surveillance data on citizens, groups, journalists, and other governments. Recently Hacking Team was hacked and their information has been leaked onto the Internet. Besides the SELinux exploit, it's been reported that the FBI, U.S. Army, and the Drug Enforcement Agency are or were customers of Hacking Team's services.

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Fedora Pinos to do for Video what PulseAudio did for Audio

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There were quite a few interesting headlines in the reader tonight. First up, Linux Mint 17.2 was released and openSUSE Tumbleweed is back on a roll. Christian Schaller recently said that Fedora is planning to do for video what PulseAudio did for audio. Several reviews warrant a mention and RedMonk published their bi-annual programming language rankings report. Sourceforge is forming a community panel and Linus Torvalds was interviewed over at Slashdot.

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OpenMandriva 2014.2 and openSUSE 42

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Today in Linux news Kate Lebedeff announced the release of OpenMandriva Lx 2014.2, a major update to 2014.1 released September 2014 and the first to support UEFI. In other news, Douglas DeMaio announced openSUSE 42, the next release of the gecko emblazoned Linux due in November. Elsewhere, Jack Germain reviewed Makulu 9 Aero and Alap Naik Desai reported Friday Microsoft hinted at a Linux OS at Microsoft Ignite in Chicago last month.

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Red Hat 7.2, Kubuntu's Riddell Resigns, and OSS Users

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Attendees were treated to a peak into upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 with Denise Dumas today during Red Hat Summit 2015. Elsewhere, Jonathan Riddell resigns his post at Kubuntu and Bodhi Linux founder Jeff Hoogland describes the four basic types of Open Source users. Lastly, Linux Voice wants to know which company does the most for Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Red Hat Fedora
  • Fedora LiveUSB Creator artwork
    As my first job as Red Hat design intern I received from Mo a task to create some icons for Fedora LiveUSB Creator. The liveusb-creator is a cross-platform tool for easily installing live operating systems on to USB flash drives. A Live USB system stored on flash memory, sometimes called a stick, lets you boot any USB-bootable computer into a Fedora operating system environment without writing to that computer’s hard disk.
  • LINE Messenger on Linux
  • Bodhi in Fedora 23 is Ready
  • Got the issue resolved and back to work after exams :)
    And also according to the feedback it has also been suggested to use a footer similar to the one in getfedora.org. Hence the modified design of the footer is also depicted in the mockups below. And as always feedback on these are welcome.
  • Please sign off your patches
    One aspect of open source that appeals to many people is the idea that anyone can contribute. All it takes is a great idea, a little bit of work, and you can have fame, glory, and more conference t-shirts than you know what to do with. The reality is often not quite as simple for many reasons. A common complication is software licencing. There are plenty of other locations talking about open source software licencing and the complications there of so this one will be narrowly focused and have a simple request: When submitting patches for the Linux kernel, whether to official kernel mailings lists or to Fedora, please remember sign off your patches.

Open source is the only way to operate, Accuvant researchers to release open source RFID access tool

  • VA Secretary: Open source is the only way to operate
    Veterans Affairs Department Secretary Bob McDonald voiced his support for open source technology July 30, as he outlined a broad reform plan that includes streamlining information technology and taking a more "holistic" look at customer service. "We have over 200 databases with customer information. That means if you want to change your address, you have to go to at least nine places to change your address at VA," said McDonald during a morning keynote July 30 at a conference in Bethesda, Md.
  • Accuvant researchers to release open source RFID access tool
    Security researchers have long known about the vulnerabilities of the RFID readers that many buildings use instead of door locks, but facilities managers have been slow to upgrade to more secure systems. To draw attention to the problem, at next week's Black Hat conference, Accuvant researchers will be releasing an open source piece of hardware that can be used to circumvent these readers.
  • OpenDaylight Project Picks Up Steam

LaaS (Linux as a Service) -- What you can expect when you build a Linux server in the cloud

Now, before I go any further with this, I should say that LaaS (Linux as a Service) is really not one of the acknowledged ?aaS acronyms. Linux servers in the cloud are generally considered PaaS (platform as a service) or IaaS (infrastructure as a service) offerings depending on how much control you need to exert over their configuration (the more you have to do, the more likely they're IaaS). The distinction may not matter unless you're setting up multiple systems in the cloud that need to interract with each other. In fact, Amazon doesn't even use these terms to describe its EC2 offerings. Read more

Migrate from Proprietary Software to Linux to Create Cost Savings

Amongst the top IT trends of the moment is the development of Linux Containers. Financial and technical investors, Linux software programmers and customers believe that Linux Containers will transform the way organisations manage their Linux environments from deployment to maintenance. A recent survey by Red Hat and Techvalidate says that 56% of the respondents plan to use Linux containers as vehicles for rolling out web and eCommerce over the next two years. The respondents included a number of Fortune 500 companies and public sector organisations. Any development in the world of e-Commerce is definitely worth taking a look. Read more