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The next step towards Mageia 6 is here, announcing sta2

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MDV

Everyone at Mageia is delighted to announce the release of our latest development milestone, our second stabilisation snapshot (sta2). We are now one step closer to the release of Mageia 6!

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More Mageia 6

  • A New Development Build Of Mageia 6 Emerges

    Mageia 6 is running months behind schedule while today the project was able to announce their second stabilization snapshot.

    Mageia 6 STA2 is now available as the second stabilization snapshot for this Mandriva-derived Linux distribution. This new release incorporates eight months worth of bug fixes and polishing. Mageia 6 STA2 also now provides Xfce live ISO images.

  • The Road to Mageia 6 Linux Continues, Second Development Build Adds New Updates

    It's been a little over eight months since the upcoming Mageia 6 Linux operating system got its first development build, and a new one is now available for early adopters and public testers with some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and applications.

    Before we delve into the new updates of the Mageia 6 Sta2 release, we'd like to tell you the big news. Starting with this development build, you can now download a 32-bit variant of the OS with the lightweight Xfce desktop environment if you want to install Mageia 6 on computers from 10 years ago.

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today's leftovers

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