Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Associated Press to impose online licensing fees

Filed under
Web

The Associated Press will begin charging newspapers and broadcasters to post its stories, photos and other content online, a pricing shift that reflects the growing power of the Internet to lure audiences and advertisers from more established media.

Tom Curley, AP president and CEO, announced the change today at the annual meeting of the 156-year-old news cooperative.

Most of the 15,000 news outlets that buy AP's news, sports, business and entertainment coverage — The Seattle Times among them — have been allowed to "re-purpose" the same material online at no extra cost since 1995. At that time, graphical Web browsers were just beginning to transform the Internet from an esoteric computer network to a mass medium.

The new pricing policy, effective Jan. 1, begins to shift some of the funding of AP to the growing online market, as technological advances and digital devices continue to make it ever easier for people to get their news whenever and however they want it.

"The need for online licensing is clear," Curley said during a speech at the meeting in the Masonic Auditorium, attended by member publishers, editors and broadcasters. "For The Associated Press to endure during this digital transition, we must be able to preserve the value and enforce the rights of our intellectual property across the media spectrum."

About 300 commercial Web sites, including popular destinations such as Yahoo Inc.'s Yahoo, Time Warner Inc.'s AOL and Microsoft Corp.'s MSN, already have been buying AP content, said Jane Seagrave, the news cooperative's director of new media markets.

But price increases are often a prickly issue for the AP because it's a not-for-profit cooperative that is owned by its customers — the traditional media that form its membership.

The AP expects to offset the costs of the new online licensing fees by temporarily reducing its annual membership rate increases, Chairman Burl Osborne said.

These rates — known within the AP as "assessments" — have climbed by an average of 2.75 percent annually over the past decade.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

This Is How the New Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon Theme Looks Like

Linux Mint project leader and maintainer Clement Lefebvre dropped some exciting news today about what users should expect from the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" operating system. Read more

The May 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the May 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. In the May 2016 issue: * Netflix On PCLinuxOS: 18 Months Later * TubiTV: A Free Streaming Alternative * ms_meme's Nook: PCLinuxOS Is The Top * PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: jlane01 * GIMP Tutorial: Make A Folded Map * Game Zone: Zombasite * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner * Tip Top Tips: Update Your BIOS The Easy Way * PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions * And much more inside! This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Paul Arnote. Download the PDF (8.1 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-05.pdf Download the EPUB Version (4.9 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201605epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (9.0 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201605mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

A step ahead on Drupal 8 with easy accessibility design

The biggest mistake is bigger than Drupal: They don't consider it at all. This isn't a platform thing, it's a problem that is endemic to the web. Big companies get dragged into accessibility via legal threats. Small companies don't even think about it. Just the act of raising accessibility as an issue, and asking your team to keep it in mind throughout the design and development process is a big deal. You have to start somewhere. Read more