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Qt WebBrowser 1.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

We have recently open sourced Qt WebBrowser!

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Also: Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Open-Sourced

How To Setup A Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Linux Computer

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Linux
Server
Web
HowTos

Welcome to small tutorial series of hosting website on Linux machine. This series of articles will teach how to setup a web server on Linux computer and make it available online. The website we'll host on our personal computer can be accessed from around the globe. In this article(Part 1), we are going to install all the required tools to setup web server. So let's get started and start our own setup web server. ​

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Web browsers for GNU/Linux

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Web
  • Best Graphical Web Browsers for Linux

    Web Browsers is one of the top most contributor of Computer desktops. As we know, we can’t do any work in system without browser help like, for browsing something, checking mails, net banking access, chatting, etc.., here I’m going to show you modern web browsers which is in active, under development and widely using in Linux Desktops.

  • Latest Vivaldi Browser Snapshot Improves Tab Hibernation on GNU/Linux Distros

    Today, July 11, 2016, Vivaldi released a new snapshot version for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows, bringing multiple fixes and improvements.

Web Browsers

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • WebVR Shell: Google Is Making Every Website On The Web Viewable In VR

    Boosting its efforts in the virtual reality technology, Google has brought the WebVR APIs to its Chrome web browser. In near future, one should expect a richer web full of VR-enabled websites that a person can explore using a VR headset.

  • Context Graph: It’s time to bring context back to the web

    The largest button on a modern browser is the back button. Trips to the web are short. Enter a search, get a result, click back, then try again. This feels backwards (forgive the pun!). What if there was a better forward button? One that helps you understand a topic better or find alternative solutions to a problem you’re solving? What if web browsers were immediately useful instead of demanding input when you launched them? Browsers could do so much more, through a better understanding of your behavior and by using the experience of people at human-scale to give you content that enriches your life, regardless of whom you know or where you live.

  • Mozilla Is Looking To Build A Recommendation System: Context Graph

    If Mozilla didn't already have their hands full with enough projects, the latest they are looking to engage in is a recommendation system to potentially upset the likes of Facebook and Google when it comes to looking for similar sites/resources.

  • This Coder Shows How To Play Games Inside A PDF File

    A GitHub user named Omar Rizwan has found a way to put games in PDF files. He even coded his own game after taking help from a tutorial. Rizwan has put the details of this Horrifying PDF Experiments on his repository.

Servo Nightly for GNU/Linux

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Moz/FF
Web

OPNFV project

Filed under
Linux
Web

[Network Functions Virtualisation=NFV]

  • Linux's NFV crew: Operators keen to ditch clunky networks, be cool like Facebook

    Network operators have a jealous eye on the likes of Facebook and Google and want to ditch their clunky networks to compete for "cooler" consumer services, the head of the open-source network function virtualisation (NFV) project has said.

    Heather Kirksey is director of the collaborative Linux foundation's OPNFV project – the open source software platform intended to promote the uptake of new products and services using Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV).

  • Nokia, Intel collaborate on open source hardware

    Just a week after Nokia (NYSE:NOK) announced an agreement to help China Mobile move to a more flexible cloud network infrastructure, Nokia said it is teaming up with Intel to make its carrier-grade AirFrame Data Center Solution hardware available for an Open Platform Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV) Lab.

  • OPNFV Summit: Key Takeaways

    The open source multi-VIM MANO, Cloudify, is giving a sneak preview of its Telecom Edition today at the OPNFV Summit in Berlin. Cloudify is an open source orchestrator used by a growing group of large telecoms and Tier 1 network operators that are pursuing network functions virtualization (NFV).

Web browsers

Filed under
Web
  • browser ktrace browsing

    The key to understanding how modern browsers work is to observe them in action. For this, we can use ktrace. I’ve posted a few ktrace snippets before, but here’s some new ones to aid in our understanding. Even if we don’t learn anything, deciphering ktrace and kdump output is a pretty useful skill. I use ktrace to verify software I write does what I think I expect. Using ktrace on other people’s software is like a never ending set of practice exercises.

  • Let's give Firefox Nightly some love!

    After a decade working on making Mozilla Web properties available in dozens of languages, creating communities of localizers around the globe and building Quality Assurance tools, dashboards and APIs to help ship our software and websites internationally, I recently left the Localization department to report to Doug Turner and work on a new project benefiting directly the Platform and Firefox teams!

  • Internet Explorer use in freefall as people flock to Google Chrome

    USE OF MICROSOFT'S Internet Explorer has taken a nosedive after its market share dropped by over 20 per cent year on year.

    This is only semi-surprising given that it has been superseded by Microsoft Edge in Windows 10, or Skynet as it's sometimes known.

    However, Edge has claimed only a 4.99 per cent share this month and the combined totals of Microsoft browsers stand at 38.7 per cent, down 21.44 per cent on this time last year.

  • FireFox OS for IoT, NextCloud announcement, and more news

FOSS in Networking

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web
  • Accelerating and Maintaining NFV Adoption: Prodip Sen, HP and OPNFV
  • Cisco Looks to Open Source for 'Badder Ass' Internet

    Big Communications Event -- Cisco needs open source to build a "badder ass" Internet -- a network with sufficient performance, reliability and security for major business applications, a company executive said.

  • ETSI Open Source MANO group delivers first code package

    The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) announced that its new ETSI Open Source MANO group has delivered its Release 0 code package, a month ahead of schedule. The institute said OSM Release 0 integrates the seed code supplied by Telefonica, RIFT.io, Canonical and others into a documented package of running code. Release 0, which is available now for download from the OSM project website, meets the commitment made at MWC 2016 to deliver working code that enables end-to-end service instantiation and represents a number of significant steps forward since the MWC demo.

  • ETSI Open Source MANO group releases initial code package
  • AT&T: OPNFV Can Bring Open Source Sanity

    The Big Communications Event -- It will be up to one open source group, the Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV), to provide a "fair playing field" to sort the multiple industry open source initiatives around orchestration, an AT&T executive said here Wednesday.

  • Telecom Companies Collaborate Through OPNFV to Address Unique Business Challenges

    Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) is an emerging alternative to using dedicated hardware appliances, particularly for service providers, where quick, flexible responses to traffic pattern shifts and user demand changes are essential. It implements network tasks like access security, load balancing, and packet filtering as software modules suitable for virtualized cloud environments.

  • Securing the Cloud With SDN

    It’s becoming clear that rising network security threats will drive increasing integration between network virtualization (NV) and security, as we’ve long predicted here. This means that software-defined networking (SDN) will become a key technology for securing the cloud.

  • Telstra Shares PEN Plans

    Just one year after Telstra completed its acquisition of Pacnet, the Australian-based service provider is taking big steps to expand its global footprint using its PEN platform built on SDN.

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More in Tux Machines

Introduction to Modularity

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Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

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The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more

Xubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Released, Upgrade Path from Xubuntu 14.04 LTS Now Open

The first point release of the Xubuntu 16.04 LTS computer operating system has been officially published as part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement earlier in the week. Read more