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Vivaldi, Opera and Chrome

Filed under
Web
  • Vivaldi Browser Adds Privacy-Focused Search Engine Qwant as New Search Option

    Vivaldi Technologies informed Softpedia today that they've added a new search engine to the growing list of search options of their Chromium-based Vivaldi web browser.

    We're talking about Qwant, a search engine designed from the ground up by a French-based company to respect users' privacy when searching the World Wide Web for anything that interest them every single day. Qwant achieves its privacy goal by not storing any cookies, nor your search history.

  • Vivaldi's New Qwant Privacy-Focused Search Engine, Microsoft Makes PowerShell Core a Snap, Red Hat Ansible Engine 2.6 Now Available, Apache Software Foundation's Annual Report and More

    Vivaldi Technologies has added a new privacy-focused search engine called Qwant to its Vivaldi web browser. Qwant doesn't store cookies or search history. Softpedia News quotes CEO and co-founder of Vivaldi Jon von Tetzchner: "We believe that the Internet can do better. We do not believe in tracking our users or in data profiling." You need version 1.15 of Vivaldi in order to enable Qwant.

  • Opera 55 Web Browser Enters Beta with Support for Installing Chrome Extensions

    The Chromium-based Opera web browser continues development with two upcoming versions, Opera 55 and Opera 56, and the former recently entered beta testing with a bunch of goodies.

    Based on Chromium 68.0.3440.42, Opera 55 beta introduces a revamped settings page that promises to help users better and easier configure their favorite web browser by splitting the settings into two categories, namely basic and advanced. Also, users will now be able to search for specific settings via the integrated search bar.

  • Google Chrome on Android will stop background tabs after 5 minutes to improve performance

    What once was dominated by Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, Google Chrome has done a great job at dominating the overall web browser market. Various reports project Chrome’s usage numbers between 50% to just over 62%, and this has actually been both a blessing and a curse. Google has been under the investigation from both Russia and Europe for their actions and their practices just may have to change in the near future. Still, even with the popularity of the Chrome browser, users have a number of complaints. Google engineers have been working on improving these lately and Chrome for Android will soon stop background tabs after 5 minutes of inactivity.

  • Google Chrome To Stop Background Tab Loading After 5 Mins Of Inactivity

Browsers: Firefox, Browsh and Chrome

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
  • Mozilla VR Blog: This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 12

    This week we landed a bunch of core features: in the browsers space, we landed WebVR support and immersive controllers; in the social area, added media tools to Hubs; and in the content ecosystem, we now have WebGL2 support on the WebGLRenderer in three.js.

  • Robert Kaiser: VR Map - A-Frame Demo using OpenStreetMap Data

    The prime driver for writing my first such demo was that I wanted to do something meaningful with A-Frame. Previously, I had only played around with the Hello WebVR example and some small alterations around the basic elements seen in that one, which is also pretty much what I taught to others in the WebVR workshops I held in Vienna last year. Now, it was time to go beyond that, and as I had recently bought a HTC Vive, I wanted something where the controllers could be used - but still something that would fall back nicely and be usable in 2D mode on a desktop browser or even mobile screens.

  • Firefox Test Pilot: The Evolution of Side View

    Side View is a new Firefox Test Pilot experiment which allows you to send any webpage to the Firefox sidebar, giving you an easy way to view two webpages side-by-side. It was released June 5 through the Test Pilot program, and we thought we would share with you some of the different approaches we tried while implementing this idea.

  • Browsh – A Modern Text Browser That Supports Graphics And Video

    Browsh is a modern, text-based browser that supports graphics including video. Yes, you read that right! It supports HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, photos, WebGL content and of course video as well. Technically speaking, it is not much of a browser, but some kind of terminal front-end of browser. It uses headless Firefox to render the web page and then converts it to ASCII art. According to the developer, Browsh significantly reduces the bandwidth and increases the browsing speed. Another cool feature of browsh is you can ssh from, for example an old laptop, to a regular computer where you have Browsh installed, and browse HTML5 webpages without much lag. Browsh is free, open source and cross-platform.

  • The most ambitious browser mitigation yet for Spectre attacks comes to Chrome

    Google’s Chrome browser is undergoing a major architectural change to enable a protection designed to blunt the threat of attacks related to the Spectre vulnerability in computer processors. If left unchecked by browsers or operating systems, such attacks may allow hackers to pluck passwords or other sensitive data out of computer memory when targets visit malicious sites.

Mozilla and Chrome: Lockbox, New Site for Thunderbird and SeaMonkey Add-ons and More

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla Announces Firefox Lockbox, a Face ID-Compatible Password Manager for iOS

    After it made sure Firefox is one of the most popular web browsers on the desktop, Mozilla continues their quest to conquer the mobile world with new and innovative apps.

    Today, Mozilla announced that it had developed two new apps for Apple's iOS and Google's Android mobile operating systems, Firefox Lockbox for iOS and Notes by Firefox for Android. The two apps are currently available for testing through the company's Mobile Test Pilot Experiments initiative.

    The Firefox Lockbox for iOS promises to be a password manager that you can take anywhere, so you won't have to reset your new passwords when you forget them. While the app can sync passwords across devices, it's only compatible with passwords save through the Firefox web browser via a Firefox Sync account.

  • New Site for Thunderbird and SeaMonkey Add-ons

    When Firefox Quantum (version 57) launched in November 2017, it exclusively supported add-ons built using WebExtensions APIs. addons.mozilla.org (AMO) has followed a parallel development path to Firefox and will soon only support WebExtensions-based add-ons.

    As Thunderbird and SeaMonkey do not plan to fully switch over to the WebExtensions API in the near future, the Thunderbird Council has agreed to host and manage a new site for Thunderbird and SeaMonkey add-ons. This new site, addons.thunderbird.net, will go live in July 2018.

    Starting on July 12th, all add-ons that support Thunderbird and SeaMonkey will be automatically ported to addons.thunderbird.net. The update URLs of these add-ons will be redirected from AMO to the new site and all users will continue to receive automatic updates. Developer accounts will also be ported and developers will be able to log in and manage their listings on the new site.

  • A Vision for Engineering Workflow at Mozilla (Part Three)

    This is the last post in a three-part series on A Vision for Engineering Workflow at Mozilla.

  • Why Isn't Debugging Treated As A First-Class Activity?

    One thing developers spend a lot of time on is completely absent from both of these lists: debugging! Gitlab doesn't even list anything debugging-related in its missing features. Why isn't debugging treated as worthy of attention? I genuinely don't know — I'd like to hear your theories!

    One of my theories is that debugging is ignored because people working on these systems aren't aware of anything they could do to improve it. "If there's no solution, there's no problem." With Pernosco we need to raise awareness that progress is possible and therefore debugging does demand investment. Not only is progress possible, but debugging solutions can deeply integrate into the increasingly cloud-based development workflows described above.

  • Bug futures: business models

    Recent question about futures markets on software bugs: what's the business model?

    As far as I can tell, there are several available models, just as there are multiple kinds of companies that can participate in any securities or commodities market.

  • Are You a Fan of Google Chrome’s New Look?

    Perhaps it’s just me, but I don’t think the look of Google Chrome has altered all that much since it blinked into life in 2009.

    But that will shortly change.

    Rumour has it that Google plans to debut a new-look Google Chrome ahead of the browser’s 10th birthday in September.

    And if you’re a spoiler fan, the new look is already available for testing.

    Now, we’re not talking a revamp based on the old ‘boxy’ Material Design here. Oh no. The visual rejig Is based on the rounder, softer and more tactile Material Design 2 (on full display in Android P and arriving piecemeal to the Chrome OS desktop).

PHP 7.3.0 Alpha 3 Released

Filed under
Development
Web
  • PHP 7.3.0 alpha 3 Released

    The PHP team is glad to announce the release of the third PHP 7.3.0 version, PHP 7.3.0 Alpha 3. The rough outline of the PHP 7.3 release cycle is specified in the PHP Wiki.

    For source downloads of PHP 7.3.0 Alpha 3 please visit the download page. Windows sources and binaries can be found on windows.php.net/qa/.

    Please carefully test this version and report any issues found in the bug reporting system.

  • PHP 7.3 Alpha 3 Released

    The third alpha of this year's PHP7 update, PHP 7.3, is now available for evaluation.

    PHP 7.3 has been crafting improved PHP garbage collection, WebP support within the image create from string function, and a variety of other features and improvements. PHP 7.3 is looking very good in early benchmarks.

    PHP 7.3 Alpha 3 introduces a lot of bug fixes from core PHP to various extensions, min_proto_version/max_proto_version options added to OpenSSL for maximum/minimum TLS version protocol values, and various other code improvements.

When Firefox Meets Chrome and Former Mozilla CEO Meets Chromium

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • How to Install Firefox in Chrome OS
  • Brave should have its own User-Agent, but here is how you detect it anyway

    The User-Agent string is the name that web browsers and other web clients send to web servers to identify their make and model to the server. This data is primarily used for statistical and troubleshooting purposes. The Brave web browser isn’t brave enough to have their own User-Agent and instead tries to camouflage as Google Chrome.

    Brave is a very opinionated web browser. This makes it easy to reliably detect it even without a unique User-Agent, and I’ll spend most of the article advocating for why Brave should have their own User-Agent. You can skip to the last two sections if you’re only interested in the detection code.

    Brave actually had a User-Agent of its own in the first few months of its existence, but removed it in April 2016. The history books (git commit logs) show that Brave removed the “Brave/Version” component from their User-Agent string to make it more difficult to fingerprint the browser.

  • How Larry Page Inspired Young Sundar Pichai Into Making Chrome A Success Story

    When Google Chrome was first launched in 2008, Firefox and Internet Explorer users had a good laugh looking at the new browser since it had no extensions, no theme support, nothing that competitors provided to users. But, slowly, people started turning to Google Chrome, and they liked it instantly. It was the fastest of all, pages loaded immediately, and people believed it could evolve into something big (the minimalist design helped there).

    Presently, Google Chrome stands at the top in browsers market with 60.98% market share against IE and Firefox who hold 12% and 11% share, respectively.

Brave Does Tor

Filed under
Security
Web
  • Brave Introduces Beta of Private Tabs with Tor for Enhanced Privacy while Browsing

    Today we’re releasing our latest desktop browser Brave 0.23 which features Private Tabs with Tor, a technology for defending against network surveillance. This new functionality, currently in beta, integrates Tor into the browser and gives users a new browsing mode that helps protect their privacy not only on device but over the network. Private Tabs with Tor help protect Brave users from ISPs (Internet Service Providers), guest Wi-Fi providers, and visited sites that may be watching their Internet connection or even tracking and collecting IP addresses, a device’s Internet identifier.

    Private Tabs with Tor are easily accessible from the File menu by clicking New Private Tab with Tor. The integration of Tor into the Brave browser makes enhanced privacy protection conveniently accessible to any Brave user directly within the browser. At any point in time, a user can have one or more regular tabs, session tabs, private tabs, and Private Tabs with Tor open.

  • Brave Browser Goes Beyond Private Browsing With Tor-powered Tabs

    The ad blocking browser Brave is presently counted as one of the top net surfing browsers of 2018, primarily for its steady privacy and secure browsing experience. It is now advancing towards perfecting private browsing

    An update (Brave 0.23) launched on Thursday for its desktop clients has integrated Private tabs with Tor to defend users from leaving digital footprints on the internet.

Web: WebAssembly, Firefox and WebCatalog

Filed under
Web
  • Remote UIs with WebGL and WebAssembly

    A frequently requested feature by Qt customers is the possibility to access, view and use a Qt-made UI remotely.

    However, in contrast to web applications, Qt applications do not offer remote access by nature as communication with the backend usually happens via direct functions call and not over socket-based protocols like HTTP or WebSockets.

    But the good thing is, with right system architecture with strong decoupling of frontend and backend and using the functionality of the Qt framework, it is possible to achieve that!

  • Level Up with New Productivity Features in Firefox for iOS

    Today, we’re announcing new features in Firefox for iOS to make your life easier. Whether you’re a multi-tasker or someone who doesn’t want to waste time, we’re rolling out new features to up your productivity game.

  • WebCatalog Allows You To Run Webapps From The Desktop In Linux

    WebCatalog is a cross-platform application designed to transfer different webapps to the desktop. The idea is not something new or has not been done before, there is Mozilla Prism to testify that it has been trying to do something like that since 2009. Now, the software we are dealing with has an updated design and an interesting catalog of applications.

curl survey 2018 analysis

Filed under
Software
Web

This year, 670 individuals spent some of their valuable time on our survey and filled in answers that help us guide what to do next. What's good, what's bad, what to remove and where to emphasize efforts more.

It's taken me a good while to write up this analysis but hopefully the results here can be used all through the year as a reminder what people actually think and how they use curl and libcurl.

Read more

Malware in Microsoft, Bugs in Android Apps

Filed under
Android
Google
Microsoft
Web
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More in Tux Machines

KDE Applications 18.08 Software Suite Enters Beta, Adds Apple Wallet Pass Reader

With KDE Applications 18.04 reached end of life with the third and last point release, the KDE Project started working earlier this month on the next release of their open-source software suite, KDE Applications 18.08. KDE Applications is an open-source software suite designed as part of the KDE ecosystem, but can also be used independently on any Linux-based operating system. To fully enjoy the KDE Plasma desktop environment, users will also need to install various of the apps that are distributed as part of the KDE Applications initiative. KDE Applications 18.08 is the next major version of the open-source software suite slated for release on August 16, 2018. As of yesterday, July 20, the KDE Applications 18.08 software suite entered beta testing as version 18.07.80, introducing two new libraries, KPkPass and KItinerary. Read more

NetBSD 8.0 Released

  • Announcing NetBSD 8.0
    The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 8.0, the sixteenth major release of the NetBSD operating system.
  • NetBSD 8.0 Officially Released With USB3 Support, Security Improvements & UEFI
    While it's been on mirrors for a few days, NetBSD 8.0 was officially released this weekend. NetBSD 8.0 represents this BSD operating system project's 16th major release and introduces USB 3.0 support, an in-kernel audio mixer, a new socket layer, Meltdown/Spectre mitigation, eager FPU support, SMAP support, UEFI boot-loader support for x86/x86_64 hardware, and a variety of long sought after improvements -- many of which are improving the security of NetBSD.
  • NetBSD 8.0 Released with Spectre V2/V4, Meltdown, and Lazy FPU Mitigations
    The NetBSD open-source operating system has been updated this week to version 8.0, a major release that finally brings mitigations for all the Spectre variants, Meltdown, and Lazy FPU security vulnerabilities, as well as many stability improvements and bug fixes. Coming seven months after the first and last point release of the NetBSD 7 series, NetBSD 8.0 is here with mitigations for both the Spectre Variant 2 (CVE-2017-5715) and Spectre Variant 4 (CVE-2018-3639) security vulnerabilities, as well as for the Meltdown (CVE-2017-5754) and Lazy FPU State Save/Restore (CVE-2018-3665) vulnerabilities.

Neptune 5.4

We are proud to announce version 5.4 of Neptune . This update represents the current state of Neptune 5 and renews the ISO file so if you install Neptune you don't have to download tons of Updates. In this update we introduce a new look and feel package called Neptune Dark. This comes together with an modified icon theme optimized for dark themes called Faenza Dark. We improved hardware support further by providing Linux Kernel 4.16.16 with improved drivers and bugfixes. Read more

Plasma 5.14 Wallpaper “Cluster”

The time for a new Plasma wallpaper is here, so for 5.14 I’m excited to offer up “Cluster”. But first, please allow me to gush for a moment. In tandem with Inkscape, this is the first wallpaper for KDE produced using the ever excellent Krita. For graphic design my computer has a bit of beef to it, but when I work with Inkscape or GIMP things always chug just a bit more than I feel they should. Whenever I’ve had the distinct pleasure of opening Krita, even on my lesser powered laptop, it’s always been productive, rewarding, and performant. I’m looking forward to using Krita more in future wallpapers. *claps for Krita* Read more