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Dozens and Dozens of Distros: Is It Too Much of a Good Thing?

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Linux

Well it was another relatively quiet week here in the Linux blogosphere, despite the arrival of a certain Saucy Salamander in town.

Linux Girl and the other regulars down at the blogosphere's Punchy Penguin Saloon had braced themselves for the worst as the Big Day approached, but the launch festivities appeared to be relatively subdued this time around. Perhaps more important, the tequila supplies held up nicely, so good cheer was easily maintained.

It was actually another topic that generated some heated conversation over the course of the week -- a perennial one, at that, picked up once again by a recent poll.

"Poll Says Too Many Distros" was the title of the piece that broke the news, which has been the topic of more than a few lively conversations since.

rest here




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