Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Clementine 1.2 reaching to the clouds

Filed under
Software




More in Tux Machines

Cinnamon 2.6 to Land in Linux Mint in a Couple of Days

The new Cinnamon 2.6.x branch is in the works and the developers have already released a few updates for it, but it's still not available for Linux Mint users. That will change very soon, according to the Linux Mint project leader. Read more

Android M Vs Android Lollipop: The Differences In Google's New Android 6.0

As expected Google has today announced Android 6.0 which it has codenamed ‘Android M’. Google repeated this trick last year when it unveiled Android (5.0) Lollipop, referring to it as ‘Android L’ right until launch. Far more important, however, is what Android M brings to the table – in short: what’s the difference? Well, just like Apple’s upcoming iOS 9. Android M will also focus primarily on optimisation with speed and battery life central to the experience. That said there is still a lot of key differences between Android M and Android Lollipop, the first of which is a potential game changer… Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • openSUSE Linux-Powered Educational Pilot Program to Become Nationwide in Indonesia
    The openSUSE Project, through Douglas DeMaio, had the great pleasure of informing us that approximately 45,000 students from an Indonesian province are currently testing a pilot program powered by openSUSE Linux.
  • Atomic Mode-Setting Still Baking For Samsung's Exynos DRM Driver
    Developers working on the open-source Exynos DRM driver for supporting the display block found on Samsung's Exynos ARM SoCs are up to their 9th version of patches for providing atomic mode-setting support.
  • Calibre eBook Editor and Converter Refines DOCX Export
    A new version of the famous Calibre eBook editor, viewer, and converter has been released, and the developer has further improved the DOCX functionality that was made available a short while ago.
  • FocusWriter Review - The Ultimate Tool for Procrastinating Writers
    Surprisingly, a lot of people who want to write expect to start perfectly, so they think that if they have the proper tools right from the beginning, then it will actually be easier to take up writing. This is the reason there are quite a few applications out there that focus on stuff like writing goals, for example, and that try to provide the minimum number of features that a writer might need.
  • Google Summer Of Code progress with okular
    Layers feature is almost done. A list of layers is being generated in the left sidebar and toggling visibility of layers is also working.
  • After 17 Years Mandriva Being Liquidated
    It's with a heavy heart that I report that Mandriva Linux is no more. Mandrake Linux, as it was known in the beginning, was the Linux distribution that freed my computer from the lock-in and insecurity of proprietary alternatives. While saddened, no one is really surprised at this last whimper. Mandriva suffered financial issues for nearly the entirety of its existence, even filing bankruptcy at least once. Fortunately, with projects like Mageia and OpenMandriva, Mandrake Linux will live on in more than just our memories.
  • Tribute to Mandrake
    Good news everyone, a new version of OpenMandriva is ready to see the world in a few days, 2014.2 will soon bemaking its way to you. Listen out for details, features – and torrents!
  • Mandrake, Mandriva, Mageia, OpenMandriva… FOSS is FOSS!
    Yesterday we learned that Mandriva, the company, was shutting down. I read a lot of sad comments on Twitter about it and realized that few of those guys seemed to be aware that actually Mandriva, the company, wasn’t doing a Linux distribution anymore for several years. The Mandriva Linux distribution, which earlier forked as PCLinuxOS, Mageia and others, is now OpenMandriva.
  • New calibre packages – finally
    During the previous couple of weeks I enjoyed several long weekends due to national holidays, and so it happened that I could spend some time re-visiting the calibre.SlackBuild and updating it so that it was able to compile a package for Calibre 2.x.
  • F22 release & upgrades, Flock & FUDCon
  • Appstream data for RPMFusion - now available!
    I've been working on generating appstream data for RPMFusion packages recently. At the moment, since only Fedora packages provide appstream data, only they can be installed using Gnome software - for RPMFusion packages, a user must use another package manager - DNF and so on. Considering that a lot of the packages in RPMFusion are media player front-ends and things, it'd make it a lot easier for users if these were also listed in Gnome software. I spent a number of hours today writing appstream data files for the RPMFusion packages - both in the free and non free repositories. I believe I've written appstream data files for all packages that could be listed in Gnome software now. (They're hosted here in the Github repository I set up for this purpose). I had already generated initial RPM packages for the free and non free repositories and submitted review tickets to RPMFusion. They're still unassigned, so if you are a package maintainer with a few free cycles, please consider reviewing them. They are really simple reviews.
  • Ubuntu Phone Update This Month Brings Many Improvements
    This month's Ubuntu Phone Update sent over-the-air is bringing a number of new features and improvements for Ubuntu smartphone users over the next few days.
  • Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE 1) Will Reach EOL in January 2016. How To Upgrade To LMDE 2.0
    As you may already know, the Linux Mint Team is maintaining both the Linux Mint systems, based on Ubuntu, and the Linux Mint Debian Edition systems, based on Debian.
  • Get Started With Tizen Development On Linux Mint 17
    The Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) have created a Getting started guide that has been tested on Linux Mint 17, and most of it should also work for Ubuntu. It shows you the prerequisites that you need as well as showing you step by step Instructions on how to install the Tizen SDK. You get to setup a test device and get familiar to the new environment that you will be soon calling your new home.
  • Speed Truck for the Samsung Z1 Smart Phone
    The Speed Truck was the third most downloaded game from the Tizen store during April 2015. The file size is only 0.65MB which takes not take up too much space, version 1.2.0. You can drive your BigFoot truck across the desert and compete against other truck racers whilst keeping an eye on your trucks health and the time limit. There will be power ups along the way to help you to enhance your speed against other players.
  • Open Source Platform Emojidex Offers “Emojis-As-A-Service”
    Like them or not, emojis are turning into the mobile era’s lingua franca. Now a project called emojidex is offering “emojis-as-a-service,” with a platform that lets developers share new emojis with each other and add them to their websites and apps.
  • First Look Media Publishes Warrant “Canary,” Releases Software for Managing Canaries
  • Twitter open-sources Kit and Digits developer tools for Android
    In advance of Google I/O later this week, Twitter is making both Twitter Kit and its telephone sign-on tool Digits open source on GitHub for Android developers.
  • Twitter Open Sources Twitter Kit and Digits for Android
  • Hands on Embedded Linux Development Training
    This 3-day seminar focuses on how Linux has been adapted for use in embedded environments, with specific emphasis on the ARM architecture. Through extensive hands-on lab work, you learn how to install a cross-development environment, build a compact version of Linux for an embedded device, install the build on the target system, and test its operation. You’ll create and test programs that exercise I/O as well as networking applications .
  • Performance and Scalability Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference
    Core counts keep rising, and that means that the Linux kernel continues to encounter interesting performance and scalability issues. Which is not a bad thing, since it has been well over ten years since the “free lunch” of exponential CPU-clock frequency increases came to an abrupt end. This microconference will therefore look at futex scaling, address-space scaling, improvements to queued spinlocks, additional lockless algorithms, userspace per-CPU critical sections, and much else besides.
  • Google Promotes Chrome 44 to the Beta Channel with Smoother Video Playback
    On May 27, Penny MacNeil from the Google Chrome development team was happy to announce the promotion of the Google Chrome 44 web browser from the Dev channel to the Beta one for all supported platforms, including Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows.
  • Mozilla Firefox 39.0 to Offer Built-in Malware Protection for Downloads on Linux and Mac
    Today we are happy to inform you that Mozilla has published some details about the next major version of its popular, cross-platform, and free web browser, Mozilla Firefox 39.0.
  • LibreOffice Viewer for Android released
  • RMS, free software and where I fail the goal
    Maybe my memory is blurred due to the fact, that the seperation of firmware from the Linux kernel, and proper firmware loading got implemented only years later. I remember the discussion about the pwc driver and its removal from Linux. Maybe the situation wasn't better at that time but the firmware was just hidden inside the Linux driver code?
  • Openness and Innovation for Smart Cities
    Apps implementation and open government data use and re-use, are examples of it, and Open & Smart Government are nowadays trends where technology has an important role. In this paper we explore this perspective, with special focus in the open innovation within the city.
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Over 30% of Official Images in Docker Hub Contain High Priority Security Vulnerabilities
    Docker Hub is a central repository for Docker developers to pull and push container images. We performed a detailed study on Docker Hub images to understand how vulnerable they are to security threats. Surprisingly, we found that more than 30% of official repositories contain images that are highly susceptible to a variety of security attacks (e.g., Shellshock, Heartbleed, Poodle, etc.). For general images – images pushed by docker users, but not explicitly verified by any authority – this number jumps up to ~40% with a sampling error bound of 3%.