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Ubuntu — Traitors of Linux, Open Source Software and The Community

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Ubuntu

What do you think? Is Ubuntu becoming too commercialized? Now featured on Ubuntu’s website: Ubuntu TV. It looks pretty cool, but that’s not what this is about. I want opinions. I want to know what you think. For me, it was Ubuntu that pulled me away from depending on –and actively using– commercialized software. And now, I am questioning if Ubuntu has become a traitor.

Linux: the concept of using open source software. The vision of being able to use a computer efficiently and effectively without having a dependency on Microsoft software. After many years of having this ‘fatal attraction’ it was Ubuntu that enabled this fantasy become a reality.

rest here




Shame

Shame on you Ubuntu!

boobuntu?

boobuntu?

Really???

It seems to me that the community itself is getting exactly what it asked for. I came to linux about 6 yrs ago. It was exactly what I had been looking for, something fun to learn and returned control of my PC to me. I took the time to hang out in the forums and IRC channels to learn the basic differences between my old OS and the new one. I searched for answers and learned how to ask questions when I was lost. I loved it! Linux is awesome!!

For the next year or two I kept hearing the cry: "if only we could buy systems with linux pre-installed, people would flock to the OS" ; "it's only because MS is sold exclusively on new systems that we don't have the leading spot in the OS war." It made some sense, but when Dell offered systems with Ubuntu pre-installed, what did the freetards do? They ignored Dell's gamble and continued to pretend they were too poor to make a purchase, or they decried the choice of linux being installed. I bought one of Dell's laptops, and you know what? It was an absolute joy to use with everything working out of the box, exactly what the community had said it wanted, but didn't support with purchases. So, now Dell has all but discontinued linux support and the community whines about that.

Ubuntu, however, continues in the direction of making linux usable by the masses by listening to the demands of the ex-windows users. So over time everything that I left windows because of has crept into linux, from the removal or hiding at least of the CLI, to now the addition of commercial and perhaps proprietary software.

But linux was never really about "free", rather "free choice." We still have that. If Ubuntu isn't what you personally want in an OS, choose another. We have hundreds to choose from. My personal favorite is PCLinuxOS, which I continued to support even while using Ubuntu on my laptop. Ubuntu has become the commercial face of linux on the desktop, it's the only way to compete in a commercial world. That doesn't make them a traitor, it makes them successful.

Well said.

Well said.

Dell Mini 1018

Yes, I also bought a Dell Mini with Ubuntu preinstalled with it and I love it.

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