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When will Microsoft sue Google over Linux?

Microsoft once made the mistake of broad-brushing Linux as an intellectual property quagmire. It made Microsoft headlines, but few friends: lawyers didn't believe it, customers didn't want to hear it, and competitors dared it to sue.

Years later, Microsoft still hasn't sued, but instead plods away at convincing the world, one patent cross-licensing agreement at a time, that everyone, everywhere owes it money for alleged violations of its IP in Linux.

This week, Microsoft made its boldest move to date, signing yet another patent cross-licensing agreement with Amazon, calling out that this agreement allows Amazon to use Linux. Yes, Amazon sells its Linux-based Kindle device, but the agreement also covers Amazon's use of Linux (presumably for the service, EC2, etc.), representing, as ZDNet's Adrian Kingsley-Hughes writes, "the clearest indication so far from Microsoft that if you use Linux-based ow[e] them money."

Oh, really?

If Microsoft has such an ironclad case in this matter, there's just one thing to do:

Sue Google.

Is Microsoft behind Google legal challenge?

Is Microsoft behind Google legal challenge?

Internet search giant Google says complaints to the European Commission that it is using its dominanent position to reduce rivals' visibility are funded indirectly by Microsoft.
Google computer screen (Getty)

Google claims the complaints against them in part derive from a lobbying body whose largest funder is Microsoft.


Foundem is a member of Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace (ICOMP), a Brussels-based lobbying group primarily funded by Microsoft, who have been historically critical of Google's power.

MS should know what a monopoly is

and what it isn't.

It isn't like there aren't other browsers out there for people to use. no one is forced to use only Google search engine. Google doesn't make deals with OEM's to only allow Google as the only search engine that can be used in a browser. That is something Microsoft would do.

If MS doesn't like it's search rankings for it's lame Bing product, do like the other companies who have a choice do and pay for the extra service.

or, maybe MS doesn't use Bing either and is tired of seeing themselves not being what people really want.

Big Bear


The last time someone surveyed data from IPs, most were still using Google. Dogfood doesn't taste good at Microsoft and some ex-employees move to Macs or experiment with GNU/Linux at home.

My brother is migrating to Linux (Mandriva) today.

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