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GNOME dev proposes vote on split from GNU Project

A senior member of the GNOME Desktop Project has proposed that the project hold a vote on whether it should remain a part of the GNU Project.

Senior GNOME developer Philip Van Hoof made the proposal in a post to the GNOME Foundation's mailing list.

His post was part of a long thread that began back in November when Lucas Roche informed members that the GNOME Foundation Board had received complaints from community members about some of the posts on Planet GNOME.

The GNU Project was set up by Richard Stallman in the early 1980s as part of his moves to develop a fully free operating system. Stallman has also founded the Free Software Foundation.

GNOME was started in 1997 by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero in order to develop a free desktop environment for use on Linux.

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GNOME considering split from GNU Project

digitizor.com: The GNOME community is considering a split from the GNU Project. The whole issue started after a message from Lucas Rocha regarding Code of Conduct and Foundation Member Membership for Planet GNOME. Mandriva’s Frederic Crozat brought up the issue of people, who have drifted away from the GNOME project, being still present in Planet GNOME.

This lead Richard Stallman, the founder of the GNU Project, to comment that if these people are working on product which are not free, they should not be allowed to post in Planet GNOME.

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