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Kernel Log: 2.6.29 development kicks off, improved 3D support

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Linux

Following the release of Linux 2.6.28 on Christmas Eve, the start of the hectic merge window phase of development for the next version was delayed for a few days of peace on earth, before business as usual, with Linus Torvalds begining to collect changes for 2.6.29 on the 28th of December. The 5400 odd patches so far adopted in 2.6.69 already include a number of major new features, such as kernel-based mode setting for Intel graphics hardware, the merger of the Sparc and Sparc64 directories, a V4L/DVB driver for the STB0899 chip and extensive changes to the XFS file system.

As part of the "What's coming in 2.6.xx" series, the Kernel Log will, as for 2.6.28, be reporting on new features integrated over the next few days and weeks. It is not yet clear how long the merge window will remain open. On this occasion and following the delays over the holiday period, Torvalds wants to allow a little more than the usual two week period for adopting major new features.

Chris Mason, the driving force behind Btrfs, has now released an experimental version of the file system, as a patch for the current main development tree; some kernel developers have, however, criticised parts of the code, and it currently looks unlikely that the file system will be included in 2.6.29, for development to continue as part of the main development tree.

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