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Mandriva Axes Vincent Danen

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MDV

Well, I received some horrid news today.

As of December 31st, my contract with Mandriva will be terminated and I will no longer be working for Mandriva. We’ve got a new CEO now, and he’s determined there is to be no remote contractors, and as a result I’ve been booted from the camp, so to speak. Over the last 8.5 years, I’ve seen CEOs come and go, restructures, other remote contractors get the boot, I’ve lived through the bankruptcy protection, been denied raises due to financial circumstances. Pre-bankruptcy protection I endured getting paid piecemeal as they could afford it… in short, I’ve literally put blood, sweat, and tears into my job for this company and have endured where others did not… I’ve stayed on when others left, and I’ve managed to avoid the axe when others got cut.

Well, that changed this morning.




Important edit

"EDIT: Over the last 2 hours there has been a flurry of communication. Thank you *so* much to those folks who commented here and have sent me emails. It is very much appreciated. I am not, however, leaving. Apparently it was a mistake that my name was on the chopping block. So, for the time being at least, I am not going anywhere. The phone call from our new CEO ensures me that my contract is not being terminated."

Thank goodness.

re: edit on danen

well, that is good news. I wonder if Adam's pink slip was a mistake too.

Nope

srlinuxx: unfortunately not, nope. :\

Adam Williamson
Mandriva
Community manager | Newsletter editor | Bugmaster | Proofreader | Packager

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