Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

5 years after the bust, a sober, new reality

Filed under
Sci/Tech

AT FIRST GLANCE, 18-month-old Jobster seems to have re-created the 1999 dot-com office cliché. The online recruiting startup occupies a loft in Pioneer Square with exposed brick, a wide-open floor plan, a ping-pong table and a dog running loose.

But the similarities between this young company and the dot-coms that fell before it end there.
The difference, as founder Jason Goldberg puts it, is:

"Web 1.0: arrogance. Web 2.0: humility."

Five years after the technology bubble burst and two years into its recovery, the hubris that shaped the 1990s tech startup is noticeably absent.

So are the five-figure signing bonuses, piles of stock options, lavish launch parties, $800 Herman Miller office chairs and the flawed assumption that a New Economy driven by technology was somehow immune from the old rules of business.

As the tech economy revs up again, a post-recession character emerges:

Drunken optimism is out; sober reality is in.
Job hopping is out; loyalty is in.
Living to work is out; working to live is in.
Greed is out; gratitude is in.

In short, the old-economy workplace is new again.

It's reflected in everything from more cautious hiring to smaller pay raises and fewer stock grants. It shows up in slower business growth, saner work schedules, and an almost violent rejection of the jackpot mentality that dominated tech companies when the economy was in full boil.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Why OpenStack is the wrong cloud for Red Hat to be building its future on

Just because one can make money from OpenStack doesn't mean one should. Red Hat, on its recent earnings call, gladly assumed the title of "Red Hat of OpenStack," meaning the "vendor that does certification and confidently allow[s] both hardware and software vendors to participate in the ecosystem." In a similar vein, I've called OpenStack Red Hat's "Linux moment," a chance to productize the growing cloud movement. Read more

Linux 4.10.7

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.7 kernel. All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.9.19 Linux 4.4.58

11 reasons why Android is winning

You know the smartphone has supplanted every other consumer technology when all anyone really wants in a car now is a “smartphone on wheels.” In a world where most smartphone users have Android-based models, Google is aiming to reach the next billion users coming online — with Android as the nexus of activity. Whether it’s as a Google Home oracle/assistant, Android Auto smart car integration, TensorFlow machine learning or DayDream virtual reality, the Internet search behemoth now aims to become the search engine for your life. Add to that a serious focus on developer tooling and solutions such as Firebase and Android Studio 2.3, and it’s clear that Google is ramping its current ubiquity up to a whole new level. Here are 11 reasons why Android isn’t just for phones anymore. Read more

Qt Creator 4.3 Beta released

Qt Quick Designer now integrates a QML code editor. This allows you to use views like the Properties editor and the Navigator also for text based editing. When you use the split view, you directly see the effects of what you are doing. The graphical editor got support for adding items and tab bar to stacked containers like StackedLayout and SwipeView, a tool bar with common actions, and support for HiDPI displays. Read more Also: Qt Creator 4.3 Beta Rolls Out QML Code Editor & CMake Server-Mode