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Fake News From Fossbytes and Techworm

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Software
Sci/Tech

Artificial intelligence/Machine learning

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OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Is your AI being handed to you by Google? Try Apache open source – Amazon's AWS did

    Surprisingly, the MXNet Machine Learning project was this month accepted by the Apache Software Foundation as an open-source project.

    What's surprising about the announcement isn't so much that the ASF is accepting this face in the crowd to its ranks – it's hard to turn around in the software world these days without tripping over ML tools – but rather that MXNet developers, most of whom are from Amazon, believe ASF is relevant.

  • Current Trends in Tools for Large-Scale Machine Learning

    During the past decade, enterprises have begun using machine learning (ML) to collect and analyze large amounts of data to obtain a competitive advantage. Now some are looking to go even deeper – using a subset of machine learning techniques called deep learning (DL), they are seeking to delve into the more esoteric properties hidden in the data. The goal is to create predictive applications for such areas as fraud detection, demand forecasting, click prediction, and other data-intensive analyses.

  • Your IDE won't change, but YOU will: HELLO! Machine learning

    Machine learning has become a buzzword. A branch of Artificial Intelligence, it adds marketing sparkle to everything from intrusion detection tools to business analytics. What is it, exactly, and how can you code it?

  • Artificial intelligence: Understanding how machines learn

    Learning the inner workings of artificial intelligence is an antidote to these worries. And this knowledge can facilitate both responsible and carefree engagement.

  • Your future boss? An employee-interrogating bot – it's an open-source gift from Dropbox

    Dropbox has released the code for the chatbot it uses to question employees about interactions with corporate systems, in the hope that it can help other organizations automate security processes and improve employee awareness of security concerns.

    "One of the hardest, most time-consuming parts of security monitoring is manually reaching out to employees to confirm their actions," said Alex Bertsch, formerly a Dropbox intern and now a teaching assistant at Brown University, in a blog post. "Despite already spending a significant amount of time on reach-outs, there were still alerts that we didn't have time to follow up on."

Scientific Linux 7.3 Released

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Red Hat
Sci/Tech
  • Scientific Linux 7.3 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3

    After two Release Candidate (RC) development builds, the final version of the Scientific Linux 7.3 operating system arrived today, January 26, 2017, as announced by developer Pat Riehecky.

    Derived from the freely distributed sources of the commercial Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 operating system, Scientific Linux 7.3 includes many updated components and all the GNU/Linux/Open Source technologies from the upstream release.

    Of course, all of Red Hat Enterprise Linux's specific packages have been removed from Scientific Linux, which now supports Scientific Linux Contexts, allowing users to create local customization for their computing needs much more efficiently than before.

  • Scientific Linux 7.3 Released

    For users of Scientific Linux, the 7.3 release is now available based off Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3.

The code that took America to the moon was just published to GitHub, and it’s like a 1960s time capsule

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OSS
Sci/Tech

When programmers at the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory set out to develop the flight software for the Apollo 11 space program in the mid-1960s, the necessary technology did not exist. They had to invent it.

They came up with a new way to store computer programs, called “rope memory,” and created a special version of the assembly programming language. Assembly itself is obscure to many of today’s programmers—it’s very difficult to read, intended to be easily understood by computers, not humans. For the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC), MIT programmers wrote thousands of lines of that esoteric code.

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Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

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OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

    Machine learning has come of age in public health reporting according to researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. They have found that existing algorithms and open source machine learning tools were as good as, or better than, human reviewers in detecting cancer cases using data from free-text pathology reports. The computerized approach was also faster and less resource intensive in comparison to human counterparts.

  • Machine learning can help detect presence of cancer, improve public health reporting

    To support public health reporting, the use of computers and machine learning can better help with access to unstructured clinical data--including in cancer case detection, according to a recent study.

FOSS and Artificial Intelligence

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OSS
Sci/Tech

RoboPhone: Sharp to Sell Real Android Phones in Japan

Filed under
Android
Sci/Tech

The Osaka-based electronics maker said Tuesday it would introduce a new mobile communication device in 2016 that is a tiny android robot. It will come with features of a smartphone including email, Internet connectivity, camera and a 2-inch display. Still to be decided is whether the device will use Google Inc.’s Android mobile operating system or another operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux-on-Sitara embedded computer triplets offer mini-PCIe expansion

VS Vision Systems has launched a trio of embedded systems that run Debian or OpenWrt on a TI AM3352. and offer mini-PCIe wireless options and optional VPN. VS Vision Systems GmbH has tapped the tried-but-true, low-power Texas Instruments Sitara AM3352 SoC for its new line of fanless, Linux-driven Baltos iR embedded computers. The 154 × 104 × 50mm Baltos iR 5221 has two more Fast Ethernet ports than the Baltos iR 3220, and adds a USB 2.0 OTG port and CANBus port, but is otherwise identical. The 115 × 73 × 25mm Baltos iR 2110 is a more stripped down version that lacks the other devices’ mini-PCIe and SIM card slots, among other features. The systems are said to support remote monitoring and control applications, as well as general embedded computing. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space
    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved. In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."
  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson
    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September. Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.
  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages
    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts. Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.
  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04
    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop. I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.
  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)
    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

more of today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing