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Sci/Tech

Stellarium 0.20.3 Released with Tons of Changes [Ubuntu PPA]

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech
SciFi

Free-software planetarium Stellarium 0.20.3 was released a day ago with numerous changes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04 via PPA.

Stellarium 0.20.3 fixed nutation and, with it, season beginning times, included many changes in AstroCalc tool, Oculars and Satellites plugins, and updated DSO catalog.

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LabPlot 2.8 Released

Filed under
KDE
Software
Sci/Tech

In 2.8 we made it easier to access many online resources that provide data sets for educational purposes. These data sets cover a variety of different areas, such as physics, statistics, medicine, etc., and are usually organized in collections.

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“It Just Works”: An Interview with Dexai Robotics

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Sci/Tech

The simulators wind up using a lot of computational power, which is one of the reasons why we use System76. Portability is another. I really like the fact that I can run the full software stack on a laptop that I can always have with me. Previously, we had desktops sitting around in a lab environment, and people were often having to sign into them and borrow them. We needed a solution for new hires to have a computer they can rely on at all times.

A co-worker mentioned that she bought a machine from you guys back in 2019. After she recommended it, I did a little bit of digging online for the best Linux laptops available, and you all were named a fair amount in those searches—so I ordered one. I was pleasantly surprised with how it just worked right out of the box. I wasn’t fiddling with drivers, I wasn’t dealing with bootloader problems and figuring out how to get a working desktop environment up; I just opened it up and installed a bunch of software and I was ready to go.

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CAELinux 2020: Linux for engineering

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Sci/Tech

CAELinux is a distribution focused on computer-aided engineering (CAE) maintained by Joël Cugnoni. Designed with students and academics in mind, the distribution is loaded with open-source software that can be used to model everything from pig livers to airfoils. Cugnoni's latest release, CAELinux 2020, was made on August 11; readers with engineering interests may want to take a look.

CAELinux's first stable version was released in 2007 and was based on PCLinuxOS 2007. The distribution was created to make the GPL-licensed finite element analysis tool Salome-Meca easier to obtain. CAELinux 2020 is now the eighth release of the distribution, which is based on Xubuntu 18.04 LTS, and has expanded its focus over the years into an impressive array of open-source CAE-related tools.

The minimum requirements for CAELinux 2020 are a x86-64 platform with 4GB of RAM for "simple analysis." For professional use, the project recommends 8GB of RAM or more with a "modern AMD/NVidia graphic card." The entire distribution can be run from an 8GB USB memory drive, with the option to install it to disk (35GB minimum). For those users (like me) who wanted to run the distribution as a virtual machine, the project recommends the commercial VMware Player over the open-source VirtualBox project due to "some graphical limitations" of VirtualBox.

There are too many different software packages unique to the CAELinux distribution to cover them all in a single article. Since the distribution is built on top of Xubuntu, CAELinux comes with all of the standard tools available in the base distribution. In addition to the standard packages, however, CAELinux bundles CAE pre/post processors, CAD and CAM software, finite element solvers, computational fluid dynamics applications, circuit board design tools, biomedical image processing software, and a large array of programming language packages. A review of the release announcement provides a full list of the specific open-source projects available, including a few web-based tools that merely launch the included browser to the appropriate URL.

It would be impossible for me to claim familiarity with the full range of tools provided, but I was familiar with many. For example, FreeCAD has been written about at LWN, and CAMLab was used in our article on open-source CNC manufacturing. I have personally used other bundled packages like FlatCAM for isolation routing of homemade circuit boards and Cura to slice 3D models for printing. What was particularly neat about exploring the distribution was getting introduced to new open-source software that matched my interests. I discovered KiCad EDA's PCB Calculator utility (simple, but handy), and I am looking forward to checking out CAMotics as another CAM alternative for my CNC router.

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Cantor 20.08

Filed under
KDE
Sci/Tech

Our developers are adding some usability improvements to Cantor and some initial results from GSoC projects are now available with the 20.08 release.

For example, now you can collapse, uncollapse, and remove all results from the worksheet; exclude entries from the worksheet commands processing; add actions for selected texts; zoom widgets; get tooltips for almost all settings options; use the new horizontal rule entry; and more.

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Cantor - File Browser Panel

Filed under
KDE
Sci/Tech

this is the fourth post about the progress in my GSoC project and I want to present some user experience improvements related to the handling of panels in Cantor and to present a new panel "File Browser" that I implemented recently.

The status of Cantor's panels was not saved when the user closed the application. Potential rearangements and size changes done on panels were gone and the user had to do the changes again upon the next start. Very bad UX, of course. Now, the state is saved and even more, the state is saved for every backend in Cantor. So, if you have a Python session in Cantor, open some panels and arrange them at your will, close and reopen Cantor with a Python session again - the previous state of the panels appears on start.

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Also: GSoC ’ 20 Progress: Week 5 and 6

scikit-survival 0.13 Released

Filed under
Software
GNOME
Sci/Tech

Today, I released version 0.13.0 of scikit-survival. Most notably, this release adds sksurv.metrics.brier_score and sksurv.metrics.integrated_brier_score, an updated PEP 517/518 compatible build system, and support for scikit-learn 0.23.

For a full list of changes in scikit-survival 0.13.0, please see the release notes.

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What Operating System Is the Best Choice for Software Engineers?

Filed under
OS
Development
GNU
Linux
Sci/Tech

GNU/Linux is, hands down, the most highly acclaimed operating system for software engineering. It comes with an absolute ton of development tools and has unprecedented performance with regard to software development.

Linux, in case you are not aware, is a free, open-licensed operating system. This means that it is very developer-friendly and can be, to a certain extent, customized to your own desires.

But, it is not for everyone.

Linux comes with a large selection of distributions (called distros in the trade). Each one, unsurprisingly, has the Linux Kernel at its core, with other components built on top. Many Linux users will tend to switch between these distros until they find the perfect 'recipe' for their needs and tastes.

We will highlight a few of these towards the end of the article.

What are some of the pros of using Linux for software development?

1. One of the main benefits of Linux, not to mention the Linux ecosystem, according to software engineers, is the amount of choice and flexibility it provides. This really does make it the jewel in the crown of operating systems.

2. Linux is free and open-sourced. This means you don't have to fork out tons of cash on licenses for the OS and other apps used on it.

3. It is easy to install directly on your computer, or you can boot Linux from an external drive like a USB flash drive or CD. You can also install it with or inside Windows if you need both.

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Stellarium 0.20.2 Released as 20 Year Anniversary Celebration

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

Free open-source astronomy software Stellarium 0.20.2 was released a few days ago as the 20 year anniversary celebration.

Stellarium 0.20.2 contains many changes in AstroCalc tool and core of Stellarium, changes in scripting engline and Script Console, Oculars and Satellites plugins, updated DSO catalog, see release note for details.

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Qualcomm’s Linux-driven robotics kit taps Snapdragon 865

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

The 96Boards-compatible “Qualcomm Robotics RB5 Platform” runs Linux and ROS 2 on a Qualcomm QRB5165 based on the 15-TOPS Snapdragon 865 with optional 5G and cameras including RealSense and ToF.

Qualcomm and Thundercomm have followed up on last year’s Qualcomm Robotics RB3 Platform with a similarly 96Boards form-factor Qualcomm Robotics RB5 Platform that supports 5G communications and input from up to 7x concurrent cameras. The Linux and ROS 2 driven development kit advances from a Snapdragon 845 to new custom robotics SoC called the Qualcomm QRB5165 based on the Snapdragon 865. (In other news, Qualcomm announced a 5G-ready Snapdragon 690 SoC for mid-range phones.)

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More in Tux Machines

Videos/Shows: AppImages, Ubuntu Budgie 20.10, Vim Tabs, KDE Plasma 5.20

Pop!_OS 20.04 Review: The Best Ubuntu-based Distro!

The Linux distro world is getting better each day, thanks to developers’ immense dedication. The OS sure has come a long way from people calling it “Complex to use” to “User/Beginner Friendly.” One of the best beginner-friendly distros recommended by almost everyone is Ubuntu. Another distro that has recently taken the Linux universe by storm with its new release is Pop!_OS 20.04; it is developed by System 76, a company that manufactures Laptops and ships them with Linux. Pop!_OS is a distro based on Ubuntu that has gained popularity lately. After using it extensively for three weeks, it has now become one of my favorite distros of all time. Here’s my review of the same. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install Zorin OS 15.3

    The latest release of Zorin OS has hit the internet. The new release is known as Zorin OS 15.3, and it is packed with the latest features and improvements. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install a fresh copy of Zorin OS 15.3! Please note that to use Zorin OS 15.3, you must have a computer with a decently fast CPU, at least 20 GB of hard drive storage, and at least 1 GB of RAM.

  • Introduction to using firewalld on Oracle Linux 8

    This video provides an introduction to using the firewalld utility. For additional videos on Oracle Linux check out oracle.com/goto/oraclelinuxlearning.

  • How to Install pip on Ubuntu 20.04 - RoseHosting

    We'll show you how to install the pip package manager for both Python 3 and Python 2 on an Ubuntu 20.04 VPS.

  • How To Install Nextcloud on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Nextcloud on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Nextcloud is an open source self-hosted file sync and share application (Calendar, Contacts, Documents, Email, and more).

  • How to install and use Slimbook Battery Saver on Ubuntu | FOSS Linux

    Linux systems can be optimized into having longer battery usage, courtesy of Slimbook battery saver. Slimbook battery saver is an open-source tool which was created by the Slimbook hardware manufacturer (Manufactures and sells laptops running on Linux based operating systems). It is effective in GNOME, KDE, Cinnamon, Unity, and MATE desktop environment.

  • How to install LibreOffice 7 on Deepin 20 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install LibreOffice 7 on Deepin 20.

  • How to install Atom Text Editor on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Atom text editor on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to fix: ‘cannot open shared object file : No such file or directory’ on Ubuntu

    Sometimes, when you try to install a program or a package from its source code, you might end up getting an error which looks like : “error while loading shared libraries: cannot open shared object file No such file or directory”

  • Secure Azure blobs pre-signing in Elixir
  • How to Install pip on Ubuntu 20.04 - RoseHosting

    We'll show you how to install the pip package manager for both Python 3 and Python 2 on an Ubuntu 20.04 VPS. [...] Both Python 2 or Python 3 can be installed on Ubuntu 20.04. However, with Ubuntu 20.04, the default version is Python 3. If for some reason you need Python 2 along with its version of pip, don’t worry, we’re covering that in this tutorial as well. Pip is not installed by default on Ubuntu – however, the installation is quite quick and simple. Let’s start with the installation.

  • SSH 2FA with Google Authenticator and Yubikey - anarcat

    About a lifetime ago (5 years), I wrote a tutorial on how to configure my Yubikey for OpenPGP signing, SSH authentication and SSH 2FA. In there, I used the libpam-oath PAM plugin for authentication, but it turns out that had too many problems: users couldn't edit their own 2FA tokens and I had to patch it to avoid forcing 2FA on all users. The latter was merged in the Debian package, but never upstream, and the former was never fixed at all. So I started looking at alternatives and found the Google Authenticator libpam plugin. A priori, it's designed to work with phones and the Google Authenticator app, but there's no reason why it shouldn't work with hardware tokens like the Yubikey. Both use the standard HOTP protocol so it should "just work".

Games: DemonCrawl, Backbone, Omen Exitio

  • Minesweeper-inspired roguelite DemonCrawl has a big free Halloween update and event live | GamingOnLinux

    I'm not sure what I'm scared of more, creepy crawly Halloween stuff or spending even more time playing DemonCrawl with the latest free expansion. With gameplay very much inspired by the classic Minesweeper, it's got that horrible "one more turn" feeling. It's so easy to get into too but devilishly difficult to actually get through. DemonCrawl needs little in the way of an introduction really. It's Minesweeper on steroids, with some rogue-lite / RPG flavour thrown into it to create a great mix. Imagine each board being an area your character is travelling through, complete with chests to find, money to grab and monsters.

  • Noir roleplaying detective adventure Backbone is 'content complete' with a new trailer | GamingOnLinux

    With a free Prologue available to try out right now, developer EggNut has announced that Backbone is pretty much content complete. Quite exciting, as Backbone: Prologue which arrived on Linux officially back in October 2019 has been reviewed exceptionally well by users on Steam. That's really encouraging on what to expect from the full game when it releases next year. The developer said in the recent announcement that, amongst other things, "Backbone is almost done" and it sounds like they don't have much left to do apart from a big polishing pass on it.

  • Need a scary story-rich adventure novel for Halloween? Try out Omen Exitio: Plague | GamingOnLinux

    Omen Exitio: Plague appears to be a title we've never even mentioned here on GOL which is surprising as it looks great, it supports Linux and users enjoy it. Released back in 2018, Omen Exitio: Plague is a visual novel choice-based adventure set in H.P. Lovecraft's otherworldy universe, so you can expect all sorts of nasty creatures to appear. Italian developer Tiny Bull Studios say it's styled very much like gamebooks of the '80s and '90s, and while it has Lovecraft themes the overall plot and characters are original and what happens is guided by your choices. You could say it's a choose your own adventure, although we don't want to get sued by Chooseco now do we.