Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

CUPS 2.4.0 Printing System Released, Check Out What's New

Filed under
Software

OpenPrinting project has just released CUPS 2.4.0 formed without Apple’s participation, which has since 2007.

The Common UNIX Printing System (CUPS) is a cross-platform printing solution used on many different Linux distros. Its use is very widespread, as it has become the standard print manager on the majority of popular Linux distros.

CUPS acts as a print spooler, scheduler, print job manager, and can store information for numerous local or network printers. It is based on the Internet Printing Protocol and provides complete printing services to most PostScript and raster printers.

At the end of 2019, Michael Sweet, the lead developer of CUPS left Apple after he joined Apple and the company purchased the source code a decade prior for this long-standing open-source printing system. As a result, Apple’s public CUPS development effectively ended and Apple now is basically interested in just maintaining CUPS 2.3 and not really developing it further.

Therefore, OpenPrinting now controls the CUPS project moving forward with Michael Sweet being involved in the effort, and the results were not late.
Now CUPS 2.4.0 is finally here in its production-ready state, bringing numerous security and performance improvements to make the widely used printing system more reliable and stable than ever.

Read more

OpenPrinting Releases CUPS 2.4 With AirPrint, OAuth 2.0 Support

  • OpenPrinting Releases CUPS 2.4 With AirPrint, OAuth 2.0 Support - Phoronix

    Earlier this year OpenPrinting took over development of the CUPS print server with Apple no longer interested in handling the future development of this open-source Linux/macOS/Unix/Solaris print server. Out this week is CUPS 2.4 as the first major release under the guidance of OpenPrinting.

    Apple's work on CUPS ceased pretty much when CUPS founder Michael Sweet left Apple originally acquiring it back in 2007. Apple is no longer actively developing CUPS but has even contracted Sweet to backport important OpenPrinting CUPS fixes back to Apple's CUPS code-base.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Free, Libre, and Open Source Software

Ole Aamoton GNOME Voice, GNOME Radio, and Gingerblue

  • Voice 0.0.4 for GNOME 42

    Voice will let you listen to and share short, personal and enjoyable Voicegrams via electronic mail and on the World Wide Web by GNOME executives, employees and volunteers. Xiph.org Ogg Vorbis is a patent-free audio codec that more and more Free Software programs, including GNOME Voice (https://www.gnomevoice.org/) have implemented, so that you can listen to Voicegram recordings with good/fair recording quality by accessing the Voicegram file $HOME/Music/GNOME.ogg in the G_USER_DIRECTORY_MUSIC folder in Evolution or Nautilus.

  • Radio 16.0.43 for GNOME 42 (gnome-radio) – Ole Aamot

    New stations in GNOME Radio version 16.0.43 is NRK Folkemusikk (Oslo, Norway), NRK P1+ (Oslo, Norway), NRK P3X (Oslo, Norway), NRK Super (Oslo, Norway), Radio Nordfjord (Nordfjord, Norway), and Radio Ålesund (Ålesund, Norway).

  • Gingerblue 6.0.1 with Immediate Ogg Vorbis Audio Encoding

    Gingerblue 6.0.1 is Free Music Recording Software for GNOME available under GNU General Public License version 3 (or later) that now supports immediate Ogg Vorbis audio recordings in compressed Ogg Vorbis encoded audio files stored in the $HOME/Music/ folder. https://download.gnome.org/sources/gingerblue/6.0/gingerblue-6.0.1.tar.xz

GUADEC 2022 Conference Takes Place July 20–25 in Guadalajara, Mexico, for GNOME 43

GUADEC 2022 is the first in-person GUADEC event in the last two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated traveling restrictions and health safety measures, and it also marks GNOME’s 25th anniversary. Read more

Timer Mechanisms With C and Linux

Timer mechanisms let you schedule the OS kernel to notify an application when a predetermined time has elapsed. You'll typically use them by providing two pieces of information. First, you'll need to specify how much time the timer should take before notifying. Secondly, you'll need to prepare a callback function to act when that notification occurs. Read more