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Ubuntu Linux 14.04 and 16.04 each get a decade of support from Canonical

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Ubuntu

If you are a home Linux desktop user, there is a good chance you like living on the bleeding edge. When a new version of a Linux distribution is released, you may find yourself upgrading immediately. After all, if something breaks, you can just reinstall the OS or move back to the previous version. This is particularly easy if you store your data on a secondary drive and you can format your boot drive without worry.

For business users, however, constantly upgrading to the latest and greatest often isn't feasible. Instead, an organization may want to install a Linux distro and just have it work -- with several years of official support. For instance, Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr) and 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) are pretty dated, as they were released in 2014 and 2016 respectively. Age aside, they are rock solid from a stability standpoint. Despite newer versions of Ubuntu being available, some organizations simply don't have the resources to upgrade. Plus, why fix what isn't broken?

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Also: Canonical extends lifespan of Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 to ten years

Canonical Extends Support of Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 to 10 Years

  • Canonical Extends Support of Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 to 10 Years

    Announced today, Canonical says both releases will now get an extended 10 years of support from their original release date, up from the 5 originally provided. This commitment brings these older LTS releases in line with the 10 year commitment already in place for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 20.04 LTS.

    As a result, Ubuntu 14.04 is supported until April 2024, and Ubuntu 16.04 is supported until April 2026.

    The announcement is sure to be welcomed by enterprise, business, and other service customers who run orders versions of Ubuntu and can’t (or won’t) upgrade to something more recent. It’ll also be welcomed by any desktop users still (!) running these versions — remember, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS hit end-of-life earlier this year.

  • Canonical Extending Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 LTS Support To Ten Years

    Canonical is announcing this morning they are extending the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS "Trusty Tahr" and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS "Xenial Xerus" releases to a ten year lifespan.

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS were already on a ten year support plan while Canonical has decided retroactively to extend 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS to ten years too, as such they will now be supported until April 2024 and April 2026, respectively.

    These older Ubuntu Long Term Support releases had been maintained for a period of five years under Canonical's extended security maintenance (ESM) offered to organizations while now they are providing ten years of support to paying customers. The only change today is around 14.04/16.04 LTS with 18.04/20.04 LTS sticking to their already committed ten year cycles.

Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 lifecycle extended to ten years

  • Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 lifecycle extended to ten years | Ubuntu

    Canonical announces the lifecycle extension of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS ‘Trusty Tahr’ and 16.04 LTS ‘Xenial Xerus’ to a total of ten years. This lifecycle extension enables organizations to balance their infrastructure upgrade costs, by giving them additional time to implement their upgrade plan. The prolonged Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) phase of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS enables a secure and low-maintenance infrastructure with security updates and kernel livepatches provided by Canonical. The announcement represents a significant opportunity for the organisations currently implementing their transition to new applications and technologies.

    “With the prolonged lifecycle of Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 LTS, we’re entering a new page in our commitment to enabling enterprise environments” said Nikos Mavrogiannopoulos, Product Manager at Canonical. “Each industry sector has its own deployment lifecycle and adopts technology at a different pace. We are bringing an operating system lifecycle that lets organisations manage their infrastructure on their terms.”

Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 Each Get a Decade of Support from Canonic

4 More Articles About Ubuntu 10-year Support

  • Ubuntu 14.04 & 16.04 lifespan extended to 10 years

    Canonical has this week announced it is extending the lifespan of its Ubuntu 14.04 an Ubuntu 16.04 Linux operating systems by 10 years meaning that Ubuntu 14.04 first released back in 2014 will now be supported until April 2024 and similarly with Ubuntu 16.04 the OS will be supported until April 2026. Only a few years ago the company would offer five years of support but starting with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Canonical has been offering a massive 10 years worth of support through an Extended Security Maintenance program.

    “Continue to receive security updates for the Ubuntu base OS, critical software packages and infrastructure components with Extended Security Maintenance (ESM). ESM provides five additional years of security maintenance, enabling an organization’s continuous vulnerability management.

  • Canonical gives administrators the chance to drag their feet a bit more on Ubuntu upgrades

    There was good news today for administrators looking nervously at their aging Ubuntu boxes. A few more years of support is now on offer as Canonical brings 14.04 and 16.04 LTS into the 10-year fold.

    Users still running on 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), released back in April 2014, now have until April 2024 (up from 2022) to make the move to something more recent. 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), which dropped into Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) in April this year, has had this extended from April 2024 to April 2026.

    Ubuntu has been quietly updating its support and blog posts to reflect the change.

    The extension is a welcome one for enterprises, who might be reluctant to fiddle with that one server that has been plugging along happily for years without intervention, and should give administrators a little more breathing space. That is, assuming that somebody has coughed up for ESM, which requires an Ubuntu Advantage subscription (free for personal users or Ubuntu Community members, but otherwise requiring the spending of cold hard cash.)

  • Canonical extends Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS lifespans

    Canonical, the creator of the Ubuntu operating system, has announced that Ubuntu 14.04 LTS ‘Trusty Tahr’ and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS ‘Xenial Xerus’ have had their lifespan extended and will now get ten years of life each. With the new extensions in place, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS will be supported until April 2024 (instead of April 2022) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS will be supported until April 2026 (instead of April 2024). This puts them in line with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS which already have ten years of support.

    According to Canonical, the extension will give organisations time to balance their infrastructure upgrade costs by giving them more time to enact their upgrade plans. The news will act as a bit of a reprieve for companies that have been hit by the coronavirus over the year and a half.

  • Canonical extends lifecycle for Ubuntu LTS releases

    In a relief to any small and medium businesses (SMBs) running their infrastructure on Long Term Support (LTS) releases of Ubuntu, Canonical has announced it will extend the lifecycle of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS release by a couple of years,

    Canonical reasons that the extended lifecycle, which now sees the distros supported for a total of ten years, will give SMBs the leeway they need to balance their infrastructure upgrade costs, especially as businesses emerge from the pandemic.

    “Each industry sector has its own deployment lifecycle and adopts technology at a different pace. We are bringing an operating system lifecycle that lets organizations manage their infrastructure on their terms,” said Nikos Mavrogiannopoulos, Product Manager at Canonical.

Canonical extends Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS support...

  • Canonical extends Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS support to 10 years

    Canonical has announced the extension of support for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS versions to 10 years . This means that paying users will benefit from something that was already implemented in subsequent LTS releases of the system: 18.04 and 20.04.

    LTS versions of Ubuntu made available for free offer up to five years of support. Those five years refer mainly to servers, while on desktop the regular support is served for three years and in the remaining two they focus on security updates. However, in exchange for paying Canonical, the lifespan of an installation of an LTS version can be extended after the free support period has expired.

    Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS have been maintained for an additional five years through the paid service Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) or Extended Security Maintenance. What Canonical has done has been to retroactively extend what it has implemented for the 18.04 LTS and 20.04 LTS versions. In other words, Canonical has added 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS to the 10-year release cycles by expanding ESM support .

Canonical extends support for Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 to 10 years

  • Canonical extends support for Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 to 10 years from launch

    Ubuntu is one of the most popular desktop Linux distributions. Not only do a lot of people who are dipping their toes into Linux for the first time use Ubuntu, but it is also used by smaller businesses for their backend infrastructure. These SMBs usually rely on LTS (Long Term Support) releases of Ubuntu, which are released once every 2 years and are supported for 5 years from their launch. Canonical has now announced that it has extended support for Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubuntu 16.04 to a total of 10 years from their launch.

    Canonical has announced a lifecycle extension for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS “Trusty Tahr” and 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus”. The original commitment was for 5 years from launch, which marked April 30 2019 and April 29 2021 as the EOL dates for the releases, respectively. Now, 14.04 will be supported until April 2024, while 16.06 will be supported until April 2026. Note that the EOL for Ubuntu 18.04 “Bionic Beaver” and Ubuntu 20.04 “Focal Fossa” remains unchanged at April 2028 and April 2030 respectively.

Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubunu 16.04 Support

  • Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubunu 16.04 Support Has Been Extended to 10 Years

    Canonical has announced that Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) have had their lifespan extended to 10 years.

    There was good news today for all Ubuntu lovers looking jittery at their aging Ubuntu boxes. Ubuntu 14.04 users will receive operating system updates until April 2024, and Ubuntu 16.04 until April 2026.

    According to Canonical, this lifecycle extension enables organizations to balance their infrastructure upgrade costs, by giving them additional time to implement their upgrade plan.

Canonical extends Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 life cycle to 10 years

  • Canonical extends Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 life cycle to 10 years

    Canonical, the publisher of the Linux Ubuntu operating system, announced Tuesday that it's extending the end-of-life dates for its Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr and 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus OSes from eight to 10 years. The company said the extension will allow organizations to balance infrastructure upgrade costs by giving them additional time to implement their plans. The extended security maintenance of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS provides customers security updates and kernel patches from Canonical.

Ubuntu releases another version of 18.04 & extends support...

  • Ubuntu releases another version of 18.04 & extends support for two previous versions

    The first time Ubuntu 18.04, Bionic Beaver, was released was back in 2018 as the numbers in the name suggest. Recently, however, Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu were forced to release another version of the operating system specifically version 18.04.6 This is just not any other update it’s actually a “new version” that was necessitated by unusual circumstances.

    [...]

    Ubuntu 20.04, 16.04 and 14.04 are what is known as Long Term Support versions. Canonical keeps releasing security patches and ports back some updates to these versions for a long time. This is supposed to help with business customers who are more interested in stability and productivity rather than shiny new things.

    We have seen how in the real world businesses have struggled to say move on from Windows XP to 7 and now we have a lot of businesses stuck on Windows 7 for some reason. LTS releases are meant to prevent problems like this. Now Canonical has retroactively extended the support period for Ubuntu 16.04 and 14.04 to 10 years. This means Ubuntu 14.04 released in 2014 will keep receiving patches and updates until April 2024 and Ubuntu 16.04 until 2026.

    Of course, an operating system made in 2014 sounds boring but boring is good as long as boring is secure and hardened. Imagine a company like Wikipedia which has gazillions of servers running in the cloud. They would rather have a very stable operating system that works and is secure than be constantly updating their servers and breaking things. LTSs allow businesses to create a recipe that works and focus on productivity.

Canonical Extends Support For Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04

  • Canonical Extends Support For Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04

    The company behind Ubuntu offered a much-needed lifeline to those who still depend on older versions of the open-source operating system.

    Both Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 are Long Term Support (LTS) versions of the operating system, both of which had already hit End Of Life (14.04 in 2019 and 16.04 in 2021). The problem is, however, a large number of enterprise businesses are still making use of those versions of the open-source platform. Of course, anyone can always upgrade to the latest LTS version of Ubuntu, but in some use cases, that’s not an option.

    Because of this, Canonical has extended their support for both versions of Ubuntu to bring those releases in line with the new 10 years support period that was given to both 18.04 and 20.04 (both of which are also LTS releases).

Ubuntu Blog: Bare metal cloud support for Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04

  • Ubuntu Blog: Bare metal cloud support for Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 LTS

    Whether you’re running a small or a large fleet of servers in your bare metal cloud, it’s crucial to have a way to ensure consistency and repeatability across them – not only to save time on wondering what the state of a particular machine is (and it’s operating system), but also for security reasons.

    With the Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) phase of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS, it’s worthwhile highlighting that MAAS provides automated OS image synchronisation – including for these releases as well as many others.

Canonical Extends Support for Older Ubuntu Linux Distros

  • Canonical Extends Support for Older Ubuntu Linux Distros

    Some of us love using the latest and greatest Linux distributions. For example, I’m writing this on a Linux Mint 20.2 desktop. But, others, especially on the servers and clouds prefer to stick with what they know. No one wants to be the first user to discover a show-stopper bug in a new Linux release when it’s running your mission-critical application. So, many people stick with old and tried operating systems. Canonical, Ubuntu Linux‘s parent company, knows this, so they’re extending the lifecycles of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS “Trusty Tahr” and 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus.”

    This gives each of them an operational life of ten years. So, Ubuntu 14.04 will now be supported until April 2024 and 16.04 will receive support all the way until April 2026. With this change, all long-term support (LTS) versions of Ubuntu now have ten-year support lifespans.

Canonical Breathes Longer Life Into Two Ubuntu Aging Releases

  • Canonical Breathes Longer Life Into Two Ubuntu Aging Releases

    Canonical on Sept. 21 announced the lifecycle extension of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) and 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) to help organizations implement their transition to new applications and technologies.

    This lifecycle extension enables organizations to balance their infrastructure upgrade costs. The support extensions give them additional time to implement their upgrade plan. The lifecycle extensions provide support for a total of 10 years.

    Canonical’s Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) phase of Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 LTS enables a secure and low-maintenance infrastructure with security updates and kernel live patches.

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