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today's leftovers

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  • Istio / Announcing Istio 1.7.4

    This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.7.3 and Istio 1.7.4

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  • Kubeflow operators: lifecycle management for the ML stack | Ubuntu

    Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu, releases Charmed Kubeflow, a set of charm operators to deliver the 20+ applications that make up the latest version of Kubeflow, for easy consumption anywhere, from workstations to on-prem, public cloud, and edge.

    [...]

    Kubeflow provides the cloud-native interface between Kubernetes, the industry standard for software delivery and operations at scale, and data science tools: libraries, frameworks, pipelines, and notebooks.

    Machine learning pipelines on Kubernetes, with Kubeflow pipelines, enable factory-like processes for data science teams. Data scientists can experiment and build data pipelines on a single dashboard, while the underlying operations and infrastructure work are handled by Kubernetes administrators.

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  • Will Kahn-Greene: Everett v1.0.3 released!

    v1.0.3 released!

    This is a minor maintenance update that fixes a couple of minor bugs, addresses a Sphinx deprecation issue, drops support for Python 3.4 and 3.5, and adds support for Python 3.8 and 3.9 (largely adding those environments to the test suite).

    Why you should take a look at Everett

    At Mozilla, I'm using Everett for a variety of projects: Mozilla symbols server, Mozilla crash ingestion pipeline, and some other tooling. We use it in a bunch of other places at Mozilla, too.

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  • Extensions in Firefox 83 | Mozilla Add-ons Blog

    In addition to our brief update on extensions in Firefox 83, this post contains information about changes to the Firefox release calendar and a feature preview for Firefox 84.

    Thanks to a contribution from Richa Sharma, the error message logged when a tabs.sendMessage is passed an invalid tabID is now much easier to understand. It had regressed to a generic message due to a previous refactoring.

  • Cryptographic Autonomy License (CAL-1.0): My first license review [Ed: Openwashing licences (i.e. faking 'Open Source' for proprietary software nonsense)]

    The bookmark was creeping on my browser’s toolbar for months. “Cryptographic Autonomy License” CAL-1.0 on the Open Source Initiative webpage. But today, I decided it was time to do my first amateur license review. This is a fun exercise (for me). Do not take this too seriously!

    The Cryptographic Autonomy License is one of newest Open Source licenses on the block. The Open Source Initiative approved it in February 2020. This license also made ripples when it came through. But the question I had, and could not find a clear answer to, was why is it so interesting?

    This blog post is my attempt to do a casual coffee-table review of the license. If you agree or disagree, I encourage you to leave a comment and share your opinion and why!

  • Best Music Players for Linux in 2021 [Ed: Almost the whole list is just proprietary software that spies on the GNU/Linux user. This is crazy. Many so-called music players are nowadays just mental surveillance platforms.]

    Many people enjoy listening to music to pass time and destress, and some people even listen to music while working to stay motivated and focused. Studies have shown that soft music can help employees stay motivated and increase productivity.

    If you are a Linux user who enjoys listening to music while you are on your computer, then you are in luck, because there are variety of music players available for Linux. In this article, we are going to discuss the five best music players available for Linux.

More in Tux Machines

Zotero: An Open Source App to Help You Collect & Share Research

Zotero is a completely open-source project that you can find on GitHub. It aims to help you easily collect, organize, add notes, and share your research. And, all of that without being a cloud-based service, it is completely offline. So, your research notes belong to you. Of course, unless you want to sync it for collaboration purpose, for which you may have to refer the documentation. To give you a head start, you can either opt for a WebDAV storage or just create a Zotero account to sync and share your research easily. Read more

GhostBSD 20.11.28 Release Announcement

I am happy to announce the availability of GhostBSD 20.11.28. This release comes with a new live system that leverages ZFS, compression, and replication first introduced in FuryBSD by Joe Maloney. The 20.11.28 release contains numerous improvements, including OS fixes for linuxulator to improve Linux Steam performance, an updated kernel, and GhostBSD userland updates. Userland updates include a MATE desktop upgrade to version 1.24.1, Software Station performance improvements, and numerous application updates. Read more

Linux 5.10-rc6

For the first part of the week, it really looked like things were
calming down quite nicely, and I mentally already went "Ahh,
Thanksgiving week, this is going to be a nice small, calm rc".

And then Friday rolled around, and everybody sent me their pull
requests for the week, and it all looks very normal again.

But at least this week isn't unusually bigger than normal - it's a
pretty normal rc6 stat-wise.  So unless we have some big surprising
left-overs coming up, I think we're in good shape.

And the diffstat looks nice and flat too,  which is a sign of just
widespread small fixes, rather than some big last-minute changes. The
exception is a chunk of fixes to the new vidtv driver, but that is not
only a new driver, it's a virtual test-driver for validation and
development rather than something that would affect users.

That vidtv driver shows up very clearly in the patch stats too, but
other than that it all looks very normal: mostly driver updates (even
ignoring the vidtv ones), with the usual smattering of small fixes
elsewhere - architecture code, networking, some filesystem stuff.

So I'm feeling pretty good about 5.10, and I hope I won't be proven
wrong about that. But please do test,

                 Linus

Read more

Review: Trisquel GNU/Linux 9.0

Trisquel GNU/Linux is an entirely free (libre) distribution based on Ubuntu. Trisquel offers a variety of desktop editions, all of which are stripped of non-free software components. The project is one of the few Linux distributions endorsed by the Free Software Foundation and a rare project that attempts to both be entirely free and friendly to less experienced Linux users. The Trisquel website lists several desktop editions. The main edition (which is a 2.5GB download) features the MATE desktop environment while the Mini edition is about half the size and runs LXDE. There is also a KDE Plasma edition (called Triskel) along with Trisquel TOAST which runs the Sugar learning platform. Finally, there is a minimal net-install option for people who are comfortable building their system from the ground up using a command line interface. The release announcement for Trisquel 9.0 is fairly brief and does not mention many features. The bulk of the information is provided in this paragraph: "The default web browser Abrowser, our freedom and privacy respecting take on Mozilla's browser, provides the latest updates from upstream for a great browsing experience. Backports provide extended hardware support." Though it does not appear to be mentioned specifically in the release announcement, Trisquel 9.0 looks to be based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS packages, with some applications backported. [...] On the whole I found Trisquel to be pleasant to use, easy to set up, and pretty capable out of the box. I really like how fast it performed tasks and how uncluttered/unbusy the desktop felt. The one problem I had with Trisquel was the lack of wireless networking support. The distribution strives for software freedom (as defined by the Free Software Foundation) and this means no non-free firmware, drivers, or applications. This slightly limits its hardware support compared to most Linux distributions. It also means no easy access to applications such as Steam, Chrome, Spotify, and so on. This may make Trisquel a less practical operating system to some, but that is sort of the point: Trisquel takes a hard stance in favour of software freedom over convenience. If you are a person who does not use non-free software and doesn't need non-free wireless support, then Trisquel is probably the best experience you can have with an entirely free Linux distribution. It is painless to set up, offers several desktop flavours, and runs quickly. For free software enthusiasts I would highly recommend giving Trisquel a try. Read more