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Python Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Build Physical Projects With Python on the Raspberry Pi

    The Raspberry Pi is one of the leading physical computing boards on the market. From hobbyists building DIY projects to students learning to program for the first time, people use the Raspberry Pi every day to interact with the world around them. Python comes built in on the Raspberry Pi, so you can take your skills and start building your own Raspberry Pi projects today.

    [...]

    The Raspberry Pi is a single-board computer developed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation, a UK-based charity organization. Originally designed to provide young people with an affordable computing option to learn how to program, it has developed a massive following in the maker and DIY communities because of its compact size, full Linux environment, and general-purpose input–output (GPIO) pins.

  • The Python Language Summit 2020

    For the second year in a row, I was invited to report on the Python Language Summit. It’s a private gathering of Python language implementers (both the core developers of CPython and alternative Pythons), plus third-party library authors and other Python community members. This year, the Summit was held over two days by videoconference. I’m no longer mainly a Python programmer, but it’s still exciting to hear new ideas for the language. The core developers’ decisions affect millions of programmers; it’s a privilege to be in the room where it happens.

  • PyDev of the Week: Seth Michael Larson

    This week we welcome Seth Michael Larson (@sethmlarson) as our PyDev of the Week! Seth is the lead maintainer of urllib3. He also writes a Python blog.

    [...]

    My first introduction to Python was in my “intro to CS” class at university. I fell in love with the simplicity of the language and the Open Source community. I’d known some programming before
    going to university so it wasn’t my first programming language but I really enjoyed what Python had to offer.

    I remember getting excited by how straightforward sockets and network programming were in Python compared to C or C++, that was definitely a feature that grabbed my attention.

  • Tryton News: Newsletter June 2020

    Since release 5.6 development has restarted, with the first changes already landing in the development branch.

    Our demo servers now no longer require authentication. This helps keep the shared servers accessible to everyone (we often found that people would change the passwords and lock everyone else out).

  • Use FastAPI to build web services in Python

    FastAPI is a modern Python web framework that leverage the latest Python improvement in asyncio. In this article you will see how to set up a container based development environment and implement a small web service with FastAPI.

More in Tux Machines

Proton GE compatibility layer has a big new release up

Proton GE, the community-built fork of the Proton compatibility layer for Linux has a big new release out. Need a quick reminder? Wine is a compatibility layer that can help to run Windows apps and games on Linux. Valve have their own version called Proton which is included with the Linux Steam Client in Steam Play, and Proton GE is a special version of it built by user "GloriousEggroll". Why use it? You might find certain games need adjustments not currently in the official Proton and Proton GE can make them run "out of the box". Proton-5.9-GE-3-ST is the brand new release aimed to now be the stable Proton GE release. It pulls in tons of fixes to help various Windows games run on Linux including GTA V, Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes, Planet Zoo, Jurassic World: Evolution, Origin client fixes and much more. Read more

COVID-19 has not stalled Linux development

Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel have been telling anyone who will listen that while COVID-19 has slowed down many technologies, while speeding up other tech developments, it hasn't affected Linux development much at all. Torvalds said that none of his co-developers have been hugely impacted either. “I was worried for a while because one of our developers was offline for a month or two.... [But,] it turned out that it was just RSI [repetitive strain injury], and RSI is kind of an occupational hazard to deal with." He added. "One of the things that is so interesting about the Linux community is how much it has always been email-based and remote, how rarely we get together in person.." Torvalds took time out to praise his new AMD Threadripper 3970x-based processor-powered developer desktop. Torvalds later added that, although he had been concerned about its fan noise it actually works well for him. Torvalds moved to this new homebrew computer because he needed the speed. Read more

today's howtos

Meet RecApp, a New Screen Recording App for Linux Desktop

RecApp is a simple open-source screen recorder tool. It doesn’t boast of huge features but gives you enough to record your screen with a simple user interface. We have plenty of screen recorders available for Linux. Abhishek prefers to use Kazam while I like using SimpleScreenrecorder. Neither of us use the GNOME’s built-in screen recorder. Recently we were contacted by the developer of RecApp, a new screen recording tool. Since I like experimenting with different applications, I took it upon myself to cover RecApp as this week’s open source software highlight. Read more