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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Deploying a containerized Red Hat Ceph Storage 4 cluster using ceph-ansible

    The landscape of modern IT infrastructure is dominated by software defined networking, public cloud, hybrid cloud and software defined storage. The shift from legacy hardware centric architectures to embrace software defined infrastructure requires a more mature orchestration "engine" to manage changes across distributed systems. For many enterprises, Ansible has fulfilled this requirement and this in turn has led to the upstream Ceph community basing their next generation management toolchain on Ansible, in the form of Sébastien Han’s ceph-ansible.

    Ceph Storage was the first Red Hat product to incorporate Ansible technology after our October 2015 acquisition of Ansible’s corporate sponsor. Red hat Ceph Storage has been shipping ceph-ansible as its default installer since 2016 (Ceph Storage 2.0), supporting Ceph Storage installation and management across a wide variety of use cases, architectures and deployment sizes. In the process, ceph-ansible has achieved an unparalleled flexibility in the depth of configuration options made available to power users.

  • Red Hat and Perficient: Day 2 Operations with OpenShift 4 MachineSets

    In Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4, Red Hat released the capability to manage OpenShift infrastructure through the use of the cluster API, with machines and MachineSets. This post will discuss a few of the exciting things that this does for day two operations and running/maintaining your container infrastructure.

    At Perficient we've been finding MachineSets very useful, and wanted to share what we've learned about them in helping stand up OpenShift deployments with Red Hat and our customers.

  • Node.js update for Red Hat Runtimes brings improved support for native modules, diagnostic reporting, and more

    Developing applications on a Kubernetes distribution like Red Hat OpenShift—or on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), or by using our Universal Base Images—is easier with Red Hat’s build of Node.js. The latest update of Red Hat Runtimes now includes Node.js 12.4.1, which provides a supported runtime for LTS releases. This new Red Hat build of Node.js together with the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 provides a number of new features and enhancements compared to Node.js 10.

    This article focuses on these new features and enhancements.

  • Why Kubernetes native instead of cloud native?

    First off, I’m not referring to Knative, the Kubernetes-based platform for modern serverless workloads, but Kubernetes native. In this article, I will explain what Kubernetes native is, what it means, and why it should matter to developers and enterprises. Before we delve into Kubernetes native, I will recap what cloud-native application development is and how that leads us to Kubernetes-native application development.

    [...]

    Related to cloud-native technologies is The Twelve-Factor App, a set of patterns (or methodology) for building applications that are delivered as a service. Cloud architecture patterns are often described as being required for developing cloud-native applications. Twelve-factor overlaps with Wilder’s cloud architecture patterns, but 12-factor goes into the details of application development that are not specifically related to cloud-native development. They equally apply to application development in general and how an application integrates with the infrastructure.

    Wilder wrote his book during a period of growing interest in developing and deploying cloud-native applications. Developers had a variety of public and private platforms to choose from, including Amazon AWS, Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and many smaller cloud providers. Hybrid-cloud deployments were also becoming more prevalent around then, which presented challenges.

  • Take the Build Smart on Kubernetes Challenge

    IBM Developer is dedicated to helping you on your journey in innovating and modernizing your applications. As a part of our mission to help you, IBM Developer kicked off the Kubernetes with Red Hat OpenShift World Tour in October 2019. Developer advocates interfaced with you around the world. With the COVID-19 pandemic and requirements for social distance, we made the move to go digital with online events.

    The Kubernetes with Red Hat OpenShift World Tour is a series of hands-on workshops that empowers developers to innovate and ship faster with the leading hybrid cloud, enterprise container platform. Join us at a workshop in your region and get hands-on experience to build applications with speed, agility, and confidence. New workshop dates and regions are added regularly.

    [...]

    With more than 100 meetups in more than 20 countries, we’re kicking this world tour to a new level: An all-digital, Kubernetes-focused coding challenge. Ready to challenge your knowledge and skills on Kubernetes, whether or not you have attended an event? This challenge is for you.

    The Build Smart on Kubernetes Challenge is comprised of a progression of four quick coding labs, which help you explore a different aspect of open, cloud-native development using a variety of key technologies. Each individual lab takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. Best of all? You don’t need to leave your desk to participate.

More in Tux Machines

Ryzen 9 3900X/3950X vs. Core i9 10900K In 380+ Benchmarks

Following our initial Core i5 10600K and Core i9 10900K Linux benchmarks last week, here is a much larger comparison I have been working on since then in looking specifically at the Ryzen 9 3900X and 3950X against the Core i9 10900K. It's the largest to date with nearly 400 benchmarks being tested, most of them real-world test cases. The past number of days I have been running this Core i9 10900K vs. Ryzen 9 3900X vs. Ryzen 9 3950X comparison with 381 benchmarks out of 138 distinct applications/workloads on both systems. With this round of benchmarking the Gigabyte Z490 AORUS MASTER and ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO were at play with 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 Corsair memory, Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD, and Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics. Benchmarking was run off Ubuntu 20.04 LTS while upgrading to the Linux 5.7 Git kernel for the very latest kernel bits. All other Ubuntu 20.04 packages were at their respective defaults. Read more

Compact 8K video encoder runs Linux on Kaby Lake

Advantech has launched a “VEGA-8300E 8K Broadcast Video Encoder” and streaming appliance for 8Kp60, 10-bit 4:2:2 HEVC real-time encoding. The system runs Ubuntu on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake CPU and offers 2x hot-swappable SATA bays. We realize that most of you are not in the market for an 8K video encoder, but we occasionally like to check in on the high-end video world where Linux is steadily making inroads. Normally Advantech’s VEGA-8300E 8K Broadcast Video Encoder would have been showcased at the NAB Show, which has been cancelled due to the pandemic. (Some NAB content is available on the online NAB Show Express.) We heard about the VEGA-8300E from an Advantech announcement on Businesswire that revealed the product has won a 2020 Best of Show Special Edition Award presented by TV Technology. Read more

Happy birthday Audacity: 20 years

Here is a next update for my ‘Digital Audio Workstation’ (DAW) software collection. Today, 28th of May 2020, the Audacity multi-track audio recorder turns 20 years old! This is a nice moment to also release the Slackware packages (only targeting -current, sorry) for their latest and greatest, Audacity 2.4.1 which was released a week ago as a quick bug-fix to the long-awaited 2.4.0. Along with this new Audacity release, I also have new packages for wxGTK3 (3.0.5.1) which you’ll need for Audacity to show its graphical user interface... Read more

What Makes a System76 Computer?

In homage to the revolutionary age of 1776, System76 revolutionizes open source technology and declares independence from our proprietary rulers. But what are the key ingredients that go into making a computer so revolutionary? The following delicious details outline the qualities we value in all of our computers. Note: Licking your screen is not an effective way to taste the deliciousness of this blog post. System76 users depend on heavy computational power to get their work done, and in some cases require a literal heavy computer. Our hardware is designed to support top-line processors and graphics cards, allowing you to consistently plow through your workload. We’re not going to call on a sedan to do a bulldozer’s job. Read more