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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Kubernetes Distribution: What It Is and What It Isn’t

    It’s easy to define what a Kubernetes distribution is not: It’s not “vanilla” Kubernetes, meaning a Kubernetes installation that you create by downloading the Kubernetes source code from GitHub, compiling it and installing it yourself. Almost no one would install Kubernetes that way because it would take way too much work.

    Instead, most people who use Kubernetes install it using a distribution. At a high level, a Kubernetes distribution is any pre-built, prepackaged software platform that includes Kubernetes.

    Not only do Kubernetes distributions save you from the hassle of having to download and build a bunch of stuff from source yourself, but most also feature user-friendly installers to help simplify the complex task of installing Kubernetes’ various components.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/01

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    Happy new year! The year 2020 has started in full swing and I wish everybody a great new year!

    For Tumbleweed, things have started off reasonably well: Snapshot 20200101 (first one of the year) has been published, and 0102 will be discarded. Ups  But let’s step back a bit and do the review of the whole week (which was the crossing over of 2019 to 2020). In the last week, we have released a total of 6 snapshots! Ok, I admit, they were all rather ‘small’ updates, as many contributors are with their families and have better things to do than submitting breaking updates. The six updates released were, still from 2019: 1227, 1228, 1229, 1230 and 1231 and from 2020 the one mentioned earlier: 20200101.

  • November and December Update for FreeCAD & Debian Science

    In November a strange bug was found in the OpenFOAM package which led to only one core being used during builds, even though the logs reported an N core build. In the worst case scenario, on the mipsel architecture, this led to an increase in build times from 17 to 92 hours! I did some troubleshooting on this but found it a bit difficult since OpenFOAM uses a bespoke build system called wmake. I found myself wishing for the simplicity of CMake, and found there was an experimental repo implementing support for it but it didn't seem to work out of the box or with a bit of effort. I wonder if there's any consideration amongst OpenFOAM developers in moving away from wmake?

    Anyway, OpenFOAM ended up getting removed from Debian Testing, but thankfully Adrian Bunk identified the problem, which is that the environment variable MAKEFLAGS was getting set to 'w' for some reason, and thus falling through the wmake code block that set up a proper parallel build for OpenFOAM. So, unsatisfyingly, as a workaround I uploaded the latest OpenFOAM version, 1906.191111, with unexport MAKEFLAGS. It would be nice to find an explanation, but I didn't spend much more time digging.

    [...]

    For the past several summers, FreeCAD has participated in the Google Summer of Code program under an umbrella organization led by Sean Morrison of BRL-CAD. BRL-CAD is a very interesting bit of software with a long history, in fact the oldest known public version-controlled codebase in the world still under development, dating back to 1983-12-16 00:10:31 UTC. It is inspired by the development ideas of the era, a sort of UNIX philosophy for CAD, made up of many small tools doing one thing well and meant to be used in a normal UNIXy way, being piped into one another and so forth, with a unifying GUI using those tools. Since it's made up of BSD/LGPL licensed code, it ought to be available as part of the Debian Science toolkit, where it may be useful for FreeCAD as an included alternative CAD kernel to the currently exclusive OpenCASCADE. For example, fillets in OpenCASCADE are somewhat buggy and unmaintainably implemented such that an upstream rewrite is the only hope for long-term improvement. BRL-CAD could potentially improve FreeCAD in areas like this.

    It turns out a Debian Request for Packaging bug for BRL-CAD has been open since 2005. I plan to close it! It turns out there's already existing Debian packaging work, too, though it's quite a few years old and thus some adaptation still is required.

  • Firefox 72 new contributors

    With the release of Firefox 72, we are pleased to welcome the 36 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 28 of whom were brand new volunteers!

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl receives 10K USD donation

    The largest ever single-shot monetary donation to the curl project just happened when indeed.com graciously boosted our economy with 10,000 USD. (It happened before the new year but as I was away then I haven’t had the chance to blog about it until now.)

    curl remains a small project with no major financial backing, with no umbrella organization (*) and no major company sponsorships.

  • Free Software for Privacy and Education: Support for REUSE (SPDX) headers in emacs-reveal

    I continue to use and develop emacs-reveal, a FLOSS bundle to create HTML presentations based on reveal.js as Open Educational Resources (OER) from Org mode source files in GNU Emacs. Last time, I mentioned license attribution for OER figures as tedious challenge, which I believe to be addressed properly in emacs-reveal.

    Over the last couple of days, I added functionality that generates license information in my OER HTML presentations from SPDX headers embedded in source files. The FSFE project REUSE recommends the use of SPDX headers to indicate copyright and licensing information in free software projects, and, although OER are not software, I started to make my OER source files REUSE compliant.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 4 "Debian Edition"

Linux Mint is a popular desktop distribution which features two main branches. The first branch is based on Ubuntu long-term support (LTS) releases and is available in three editions: Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce. The second branch uses Debian Stable releases as its foundation and is available in one edition: Cinnamon. The project's latest release is Linux Mint 4 "Debian Edition", also sometimes written LMDE 4. Much of the work which has gone into LMDE 4 focuses on bringing the Debian branch of Linux Mint up to date with the Ubuntu branch, which seems to get the bulk of the developers' focus. The latest improvements include better VirtualBox support, access to the System Reports tool, and APT's recommended packages being enabled by default... Read more

OSS Leftovers

  • How open source ad blockers could save you 2 hours a week

    More importantly, the results show how you can get that time back. The study estimates that the average Internet user would save over 100 hours a year by using uBlock Origin, a free and open source ad blocker. “uBlock Origin was the most effective ad blocker tested, but all ad blockers save time, energy and money”, explained Joshua Pearce, a Professor of Engineering at Michigan Technological University.

  • Open Source Software to realize Conversational AI – COTOBA Agent OSS

    Tokyo based Conversational AI Product Startup, releases their core technologies as Open Source Software (OSS), entitled “COTOBA Agent OSS.” This allows you to: (a) Embrace industrial conversational AI as a white box: It can utilize sensor information from IoT with external APIs; (b) Utilize its secured and scaling-out capabilities: More than 5,000 tests are conducted for large-scale commercial use; (c) Commercialize the OSS with MIT license: There is no limitation to copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute and sublicense.

  • Magnolia 6.2 Released, Two TYPO3 Releases Available, and More Open Source News

    Magnolia 6.2 — a long-term service release — is has become available. This version includes a number of exciting new features that include the following.

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR21 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 21 final is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). Since the beta looks like it's working well, this release simply completes the upgrade with updates to the ATSUI font blacklist and all outstanding security patches, including backported fixes from the recent Mozilla security chemspill for CVE-2020-6819 and CVE-2020-6820. Note that while we are indeed vulnerable to those security issues and they are fixed in FPR21, they would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be successful. Assuming no issues, this will go live Monday evening Pacific time as usual.

The Academy Software Foundation and the Advantages of Open Source Software

The initial investigation included an industry-wide survey, a series of one-on-one interviews with key stakeholders, and three Academy Open Source Summits held at the Academy headquarters, according to Andy Maltz, Managing Director, Science and Technology Council, AMPAS, and ASWF Board Member. Comments Bredow, “They identified the key common challenges they were seeing with open source software. The first was making it easier for engineers to contribute to OSS with a modern software build environment hosted for free in the cloud. The second was supporting users of open source software by helping to reduce the existing version conflicts between various open source software packages. And the third was providing a common legal framework to support open source software. “The mission of the Academy Software Foundation,” Bredow elaborates, “is to increase the quality and quantity of contributions to the content creation industry’s open source software base; to provide a neutral forum to coordinate cross-project efforts; to provide a common build and test infrastructure; and to provide individuals and organizations a clear path to participation in advancing our open source ecosystem.” Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast, GNU World Order and Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

  • Linux Action News 152

    WireGuard officially lands in Linux. We cover a bunch of new features in Linux 5.6 and discuss the recent challenges facing LineageOS. Plus the PinePhone UBports edition goes up for pre-order, and our reaction to Huawei joining the Open Invention Network.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 190 - Building a talent "ecosystem"

    Josh and Kurt talk about building a talent ecosystem. What starts out as an attempt by Kurt to talk about Canada evolves into a discussion about how talent can evolve, or be purposely grown. Canada's entertainment industry and Unit 8200 are good examples of this.

  • gnuWorldOrder_348

    Musing about the **Common Unix Printing System (CUPS)**. Next episode will be about the **CUPS** and **lpr** command set.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E02 – Walking under ladders

    This week we’ve been live streaming Ubuntu development and replacing VirtualBox with Bash. We discuss Mark’s new Linux Steam PC set-up, bring you some musical command-line love and go over all your feedback! It’s Season 13 Episode 02 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.