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today's leftovers

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  • AMDVLK 2019.Q4.2 Brings Several More Extensions, Game Tuning

    AMDVLK 2019.Q4.2 is out today as AMD's second open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver update for the fourth quarter.

    With a while since 2019.Q4.1, today's update is fairly notable especially with newly supported Vulkan extensions. Now wired up for this AMD Vulkan Linux driver is VK_KHR_shader_subgroup_extended_types, VK_KHR_pipeline_executable_properties, VK_KHR_timeline_semaphore, VK_KHR_shader_clock, and VK_KHR_spirv_1_4. Also new is computeFullSubgroups support.

  • The Khronos Group have now released a Vulkan Guide to get you started

    The Khronos Group seems to be making another big push for Vulkan API adoption lately, after putting up an official GitHub repository of code samples they've now done a Vulkan Guide.

    Another joint effort between Khronos members, with an aim of it being "the perfect place to get started with the API". It's aimed to be a mostly light read, that links to many other helpful resources for learning Vulkan development. They say it's "intended to help better fill the gaps about the many nuances of Vulkan".

  • Managing software and services with Cockpit

    The Cockpit series continues to focus on some of the tools users and administrators can use to perform everyday tasks within the web user-interface. So far we’ve covered introducing the user-interface, storage and network management, and user accounts. Hence, this article will highlight how Cockpit handles software and services.

    [...]

    Because Cockpit uses systemd, we get the options to view System Services, Targets, Sockets, Timers, and Paths. Cockpit also provides an intuitive interface to help users search and find the service they want to configure. Services can also be filtered by it’s state: All, Enabled, Disabled, or Static. Below this is the list of services. Each row displays the service name, description, state, and automatic startup behavior.

  • Fedora Stakeholders Debate Statically Linking Python For Better Performance

    A surprisingly controversial proposal for Fedora 32 is to shift from dynamically linking Python 3 with the libpython3.X.so library to static linking. The change can yield double digit percentage improvements to Python scripts but at the cost of larger on-disk space. 

    There is a change proposal for next spring's Fedora 32 release to switch to static linking with Python 3 and its library. A 5~27% improvement has been reported as the possible benefit to Fedora though that may vary depending upon the actual Python workload. 

  • Partnering with Nutanix to run Windows and Linux desktop apps on GCP
  • The FreeBSD Migration To OpenZFS Is Still Looking To Be A Great Change

    Last year it was decided that FreeBSD's ZFS code would be re-based on OpenZFS (ZFS On Linux) code for ultimately better support and functionality as well as largely unifying the open-source ZFS ecosystem. While still transitioning towards the OpenZFS code-base, for FreeBSD it's still looking to be a positive move and one that will pay off for all parties involved. 

  • CEO Of Security Company Behind Unorthodox Penetration Tests Wants To Know Why His Employees Are Still Being Criminally Charged

           

             

    A couple of months ago, security researchers performing a very physical penetration test of an Iowa courthouse were arrested for breaking and entering. They were also charged with possessing burglar's tools, which they did indeed possess.

  • You’ve Been Served…with Subpoena-Themed Phishing Emails

                 

                   

    According to researchers, the phishing emails are spoofing the UK Ministry of Justice, aiming to capitalize on scare tactics to convince targets to click on an embedded link to “learn more about the case” by saying that the recipient has 14 days to comply with the subpoena notice. If the target clicks on the link, he or she will find themselves infected with Predator the Thief, a publicly available information-stealing malware that’s not often seen in phishing campaigns.

  • Publishers Should be Making E-Book Licensing Better, Not Worse

    Macmillan, one of the “Big Five” publishers, is imposing new limits on libraries’ access to ebooks—and libraries and their users are fighting back.

    Starting last week, the publisher is imposing a two-month embargo period on library ebooks. When Macmillan releases a new book, library systems will be able to purchase only one digital copy for the first eight weeks after it’s published. Macmillan is offering this initial copy for half-price ($30), but that has not taken away the sting for librarians who will need to answer to frustrated users. In large library systems in particular, readers are likely to experience even longer hold queues for new Macmillan e-book releases. For example, under the new Macmillan embargo, the 27 branches of the San Francisco Public Library system, serving a city of nearly 900,000 people, will have to share one single copy right when the demand for the new title is the greatest.

  • Tuya helps you easily Design & Manufacture your own Smart Home Solutions

    One person in the LetsControlIt forum thread linked above explains the stock firmware can be updated over-the-air via a Raspberry Pi 3/3+ board using a project named Tuya-Convert.

    [...]

    I stopped there, so sorry there won’t be any CNX Software branded devices, but we can see it’s 5-steps process with functions definition, app UI design, hardware debug, advanced features, and mass production.

    The company also claims to offer “Military-grade AES and HTTPS WAN/LAN encryption”, but Michael Steigerwald, founder of the German IT security startup VTRUST, disproved the claim as the messages contain “canttouchthis” unencrypted password, at least that was the case in December 2018.

    So if you ever wanted to launch your own brand, it looks to be an easy way to get started, but you may want to handle the firmware & software part on your own.

  • The EU declares war on e-waste

    As of 2021, manufacturers across Europe will be required to improve both the reparability and service life of devices such as washing machines, refrigerators, dishwashers, electric motors, light sources and LED screens. Manufacturers must also be more precise when it comes to including energy consumption information on the labels of their products and providing replacement parts for at least 10 years after purchase.

    Laptops and smartphones, however, are not covered under the new rules — more on that later.

  • PyCharm 2019.3 Beta

    We’re very excited to announce the Beta release for PyCharm 2019.3, a feature-complete preview of the upcoming release. Give the Beta build a go and try all the new functionality – download it from our website.

  • Webinar Recording: “Visual SQL Development with PyCharm” with Maxim Sobolevskiy

    This week we had a webinar with Maxim Sobolevskiy, the DataGrip Product Marketing Manager, showing the wonderful, magical Database tool in PyCharm. The webinar recording is now available.

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The world's fastest supercomputers hit higher speeds than ever with Linux

Yes, there's a lot of talk now about how quantum computers can do jobs in 200 seconds that would take the world's fastest supercomputers 10,000 years. That's nice. But the simple truth is, for almost all jobs, supercomputers are faster than anything else on the planet. And, in the latest Top 500 supercomputer ratings, the average speed of these Linux-powered racers is now an astonishing 1.14 petaflops. The fastest of the fast machines haven't changed since the June 2019 Top 500 supercomputer list. Leading the way is Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Summit system, which holds top honors with an HPL result of 148.6 petaflops. This is an IBM-built supercomputer using Power9 CPUs and NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs. Read more